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    Hi everybody !

    I am a french student, who graduated an LLB last year in a French university in Paris, and about to graduate an LLM this year. My long term goal is to get an LLM, a GDL and to become a solicitor in the UK.

    I applied to Oxbridge (LLM or Magisterjuris) and still waiting for them to answer.
    I got an offer at UCL, LSE and Queen Mary.

    The thing is I really want to get to Oxbridge more than anything. My question si the following: if I don't get accepted to Oxbridge, should I do the GDL and then re-apply again after? Or this wouldn't give me any more chances ?

    Thank you in advance for you help!
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    (Original post by fslawymb)
    Hi everybody !

    I am a french student, who graduated an LLB last year in a French university in Paris, and about to graduate an LLM this year. My long term goal is to get an LLM, a GDL and to become a solicitor in the UK.

    I applied to Oxbridge (LLM or Magisterjuris) and still waiting for them to answer.
    I got an offer at UCL, LSE and Queen Mary.

    The thing is I really want to get to Oxbridge more than anything. My question si the following: if I don't get accepted to Oxbridge, should I do the GDL and then re-apply again after? Or this wouldn't give me any more chances ?

    Thank you in advance for you help!
    You already did law in France right? If so do you need to do a GDL and not the LPC instead?
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    I already did law in France right ! But considering the fact that I have a FRENCH law degree (and not a british one), I have to go through a GDL.
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    You need to investigate whether your LLB is a qualifying law degree. If it is, you're fine to do as you please.

    However, if it isn't, you will need to do the GDL, then most likely the LPC, to practice in the UK as a solicitor. But, given your educational background and possible experience, if I were you I'd be applying for Training Contracts in advance, since some firms will pay your fees for these courses, and they aren't cheap.

    Concerning your application to "Oxbridge". This is the collective term for Oxford and Cambridge. They are two separate institutions. In addition, they may only entertain applications for Law Masters if you have a qualifying law degree that is viewed as valid for the courts of England and Wales. If you've called them Oxbridge in your applications, I wouldn't hold your breath on getting accepted. The LLM is unlikely to add much to your applications for training contracts, concentrate on getting experience in commercial law instead.
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    (Original post by Mimir)
    You need to investigate whether your LLB is a qualifying law degree. If it is, you're fine to do as you please.

    However, if it isn't, you will need to do the GDL, then most likely the LPC, to practice in the UK as a solicitor. But, given your educational background and possible experience, if I were you I'd be applying for Training Contracts in advance, since some firms will pay your fees for these courses, and they aren't cheap.

    Concerning your application to "Oxbridge". This is the collective term for Oxford and Cambridge. They are two separate institutions. In addition, they may only entertain applications for Law Masters if you have a qualifying law degree that is viewed as valid for the courts of England and Wales. If you've called them Oxbridge in your applications, I wouldn't hold your breath on getting accepted. The LLM is unlikely to add much to your applications for training contracts, concentrate on getting experience in commercial law instead.
    Thank you for you answer.

    I know Oxford and Cambridge are two different universities, thank you.
    You're saying that the LLM is unlikely to add much to my application for training contrats, are you sure about this ? Wouldn't be a valuable criteria when applying for a training contract?
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    (Original post by fslawymb)
    Thank you for you answer.

    I know Oxford and Cambridge are two different universities, thank you.
    You're saying that the LLM is unlikely to add much to my application for training contrats, are you sure about this ? Wouldn't be a valuable criteria when applying for a training contract?
    Pretty certain, but it depends on your individual application.

    You could consider finding something else to set yourself apart from other applicants. Many do have an LLM - the major providers of the GDL in England also provide the opportunity to do a small amount of extra studying which leads to an LLM. Some people do this if they don't get a training contract, or alongside the Legal Practice Course (which you need to do before starting as a trainee).

    Firms are more interested in your business acumen and experience in commercial environment, I think.

    Copying in J-SP who lives in a different area of TSR and knows so much more about this sort of thing and might be able to help!
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    There is no point doing the GDL unless you want to do a training contract in the UK. And there is little point in doing a training contract unless you want to work in the UK for at least the medium term. If you want to do this, then it doesn't really matter if you do the GDL before or after the LLM (although after "may" allow for more exemptions) - most firms won't care if you have an LLM or not. Those that do will probably want the LLM to be more closely related to their business area (e.g. IP LLM > IP firm).

    As it stands, you will need to do the GDL and LPC, and then a two year training contract. You might get some exemptions for certain modules within the GDL depending on what you have studied in your undergraduate and LLM courses, but you will still need to undertake it and gain the qualification.

    You should also be aware that the whole qualification process for England & Wales is potentially about to change. There might not be a GDL or LPC in the not too distant future, and instead you can take what is being called the SQE (Solicitors Qualification Exam).
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    There is no point doing the GDL unless you want to do a training contract in the UK. And there is little point in doing a training contract unless you want to work in the UK for at least the medium term. If you want to do this, then it doesn't really matter if you do the GDL before or after the LLM (although after "may" allow for more exemptions) - most firms won't care if you have an LLM or not. Those that do will probably want the LLM to be more closely related to their business area (e.g. IP LLM > IP firm).

    As it stands, you will need to do the GDL and LPC, and then a two year training contract. You might get some exemptions for certain modules within the GDL depending on what you have studied in your undergraduate and LLM courses, but you will still need to undertake it and gain the qualification.

    You should also be aware that the whole qualification process for England & Wales is potentially about to change. There might not be a GDL or LPC in the not too distant future, and instead you can take what is being called the SQE (Solicitors Qualification Exam).
    Thank you a lot for this complete answer.

    Do you have any idea on when this future SQE will replace the GDL/LPC ?
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    (Original post by fslawymb)
    Thank you a lot for this complete answer.

    Do you have any idea on when this future SQE will replace the GDL/LPC ?
    SQE is due to be launched this Autumn, with a five year transition period with the last possible date for someone to start a training contract under its current format being September 2022 (however, that means the GDL would have to be started by 2020, so only three years away).
 
 
 
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