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    Not sure if I'm the only one this happens to, but in any case was wondering if anyone could offer any advice?

    Basically I seem to have a track record of obsessing over something (potential new hobby, career change, going back to education) and then working myself into such a state through overthinking every detail and eventuality that I end up giving up (as opposed to logically concluding that "whatever" isn't for me) after exhausting myself through research/starting down whichever path.

    I used to blame the giving up on lack of ambition, but have recently realised it's more likely too much (rather than not enough) ambition which gets me. It's as if I want the world, and the world takes all I can give and leaves me empty.

    Seriously though, at one time or another I've seriously looked at multiple career lines and could probably even now reel off the basics to getting in to them (even though I've long written them off) and even gone as far as to start applying to courses to get into them (most recent was Law with the OU 18 months ago).

    I'm now at the stage where I've decided I definitely *do* want to do the Uni route but it's probably best for me to be doing a subject I like and working out career options further down the line (English Lit, 2018 entry to give me enough time to get used to the idea, sort stuff out etc.).

    So yeah. How do I break the obsession cycle? Coz it won't get me anywhere long term if I keep putting myself off options that come my way, and it certainly isn't healthy giving myself sleepless nights and being permanently distracted during the day, especially if after all that I end up wasting the sleeplessness/distraction etc. and loathing whichever thing it is.

    In case it helps, I do have a history of anxiety (been on and off meds a few times, usually bad spells caused by major events - most recent bout was as a result of realising Law wasn't for me and was either cause or effect of me not doing the course). Mostly these days I tend to avoid situations will cause panic attacks but even at times when I thought I would have had one recently (stressful days at work and the like) I've generally been lucky enough to be able to support myself through them and not end up getting anxious. Hooray for adequate self-care?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Not sure if I'm the only one this happens to, but in any case was wondering if anyone could offer any advice?

    Basically I seem to have a track record of obsessing over something (potential new hobby, career change, going back to education) and then working myself into such a state through overthinking every detail and eventuality that I end up giving up (as opposed to logically concluding that "whatever" isn't for me) after exhausting myself through research/starting down whichever path.

    I used to blame the giving up on lack of ambition, but have recently realised it's more likely too much (rather than not enough) ambition which gets me. It's as if I want the world, and the world takes all I can give and leaves me empty.

    Seriously though, at one time or another I've seriously looked at multiple career lines and could probably even now reel off the basics to getting in to them (even though I've long written them off) and even gone as far as to start applying to courses to get into them (most recent was Law with the OU 18 months ago).

    I'm now at the stage where I've decided I definitely *do* want to do the Uni route but it's probably best for me to be doing a subject I like and working out career options further down the line (English Lit, 2018 entry to give me enough time to get used to the idea, sort stuff out etc.).

    So yeah. How do I break the obsession cycle? Coz it won't get me anywhere long term if I keep putting myself off options that come my way, and it certainly isn't healthy giving myself sleepless nights and being permanently distracted during the day, especially if after all that I end up wasting the sleeplessness/distraction etc. and loathing whichever thing it is.

    In case it helps, I do have a history of anxiety (been on and off meds a few times, usually bad spells caused by major events - most recent bout was as a result of realising Law wasn't for me and was either cause or effect of me not doing the course). Mostly these days I tend to avoid situations will cause panic attacks but even at times when I thought I would have had one recently (stressful days at work and the like) I've generally been lucky enough to be able to support myself through them and not end up getting anxious. Hooray for adequate self-care?
    Been trying to work out what to say to this, sorry! I'm very similar to you and know other people that are too- often it ends up being a big distraction from something I need to be doing. For me most recently it has been uni and careers as well, and I've also ended up coming to the conclusion I'm better off doing something more general (although still the sort of area I'm interested in obviously) then specialising after for a whole range of reasons. I also think it's quite common for it to be related to anxiety, which people show in different ways.

    So, what might help. Firstly talk to your GP about it and see what they suggest- something like CBT in particular could really help with this I think. There's also online courses of it like Moodgym but face to face is better if you can. Recognising what you're doing is the first step which you've done, which is great the other thing is mindfulness- look around the place online but it can be really good for trying to break the cycle, and just settle down a bit and try and be 'in the moment' as my therapist would say. I hate that phrase but slowly realising she has a point! I quite like online jigsaws for something to calm me down and distract myself, and music, other people do colouring and things so there's loads you can try. Hope some of that ramble helps a bit anyway, and sorry for the late reply!
 
 
 
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