Cheltenham ladies college Watch

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BazTheMoney
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#61
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#61
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Oh, I don't know baz, I've had a leatherman or swiss army knife since I was a nipper for preparing choice conkers Lethal I was
We didn't have too many conker trees down in the center of London; a knife wasn't needed.
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BazTheMoney
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#62
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#62
(Original post by aliel)
Mentally tough? In what sense? In terms of drive and motivation i presume?
Partly, also in the sense that you're by yourself 30 weeks a year; don't get to go back to Mummy and Daddy everynight.
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aliel
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#63
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#63
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
Partly, also in the sense that you're by yourself 30 weeks a year; don't get to go back to Mummy and Daddy everynight.
Well a lot of mummy's and daddy's do such things as shift work...and this means that when the child returns home after school they are alone in the house. And in fact, may have to *even* tuck themselves into bed...
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#64
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#64
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
Partly, also in the sense that you're by yourself 30 weeks a year; don't get to go back to Mummy and Daddy everynight.
Aww, the poor deprived boarding schoolers

As I said before, once you're at university there's no real distinct differences between state schoolers, boarders, grammar schoolers etc regarding all these traits being referred to here; it's much more down to the individual.
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aliel
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#65
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#65
(Original post by Jools)
Aww, the poor deprived boarding schoolers

As I said before, once you're at university there's no real distinct differences between state schoolers, boarders, grammar schoolers etc regarding all these traits being referred to here; it's much more down to the individual.
Indeedy....Ooooooh how far will it take me to walk from Pembroke to the pool/gym?
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BazTheMoney
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#66
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#66
(Original post by aliel)
Well a lot of mummy's and daddy's do such things as shift work...and this means that when the child returns home after school they are alone in the house. And in fact, may have to *even* tuck themselves into bed...
I don't believe that every single child that goes to a comprehensive has parents doing night shifts and risk their life everyday by going to school. Loads of people in this country earn between £16,000-24,000; that means most families have a combinded income of around £35,000pa. We like to polarise for dramatic effect in this country, people don't realise that there is a massive group (Socio-economic D and C's) that are neither rich or poor; and 95% of these people send their children to comprehensives.
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#67
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#67
(Original post by aliel)
Indeedy....Ooooooh how far will it take me to walk from Pembroke to the pool/gym?
The Iffley Road pool/sports arena's a fair trek, abt 25 min walk or 5 mins by bike. My accom next yr's near Pembroke *STALKER ALERT*
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aliel
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#68
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#68
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
I don't believe that every single child that goes to a comprehensive has parents doing night shifts and risk their life everyday by going to school. Loads of people in this country earn between £16,000-24,000; that means most families have a combinded income of around £35,000pa. We like to polarise for dramatic effect in this country, people don't realise that there is a massive group (Socio-economic D and C's) that are neither rich or poor; and 95% of these people send their children to comprehensives.
I was being sarcastic, did you not notice from my use of "*even*".

I'm sure you are also aware of the rising numbers of single families however, and although "not every single child" who attends a comprehensive parent('s) do night shifts- this is a reality for a large number.

(I would love to find some stats, but with a combined income of £35,000 living in the South East, would not find it hard to imagine people having to get second jobs that mean they work night shifts ...)
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aliel
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#69
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#69
(Original post by Jools)
The Iffley Road pool/sports arena's a fair trek, abt 25 min walk or 5 mins by bike. My accom next yr's near Pembroke *STALKER ALERT*
If i see you around I will say hey
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BazTheMoney
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#70
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(Original post by aliel)
I was being sarcastic, did you not notice from my use of "*even*".

I'm sure you are also aware of the rising numbers of single families however, and although "not every single child" who attends a comprehensive parent('s) do night shifts- this is a reality for a large number.

(I would love to find some stats, but with a combined income of £35,000 living in the South East, would not find it hard to imagine people having to get second jobs that mean they work night shifts ...)
Yes, there may be more single parent families, but also more people are going on holidays now than every before, more people own cars, more people have computers. The increase in demand for luxury goods indicates that not many people are poor, not many people have to do two jobs to pay the rent and put food on the tables; in fact, most people, have fairly comfortable lives.
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aliel
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#71
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#71
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
Yes, there may be more single parent families, but also more people are going on holidays now than every before, more people own cars, more people have computers. The increase in demand for luxury goods indicates that not many people are poor, not many people have to do two jobs to pay the rent and put food on the tables; in fact, most people, have fairly comfortable lives.
Ooooh *so* disagree with that. The term luxury goods was widely used in late 80s and 90s to include such things as cars and computers. However, times have changed and the way in which a car and a PC is viewed has changed. A car is used by many as a means of earning money, in that a car is needed for them to travel to work where they will earn their living. The relative cost of a PC has much decreased over the last decade and again, is not viewed in the UK as a luxury good. I would have to disagree with your comment that "most people have fairly comfortable lives", the average person is in more debt than ever, having huge amounts of debt on top of your head does not enable the average person to live comfortably. Instead of getting a "second job", what has happened is that people work longer hours, do not have appropriate savings and/or take long-term loans/credit to fund their lifestyle.
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thinktwice
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#72
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#72
I got offers from both Cheltenham Ladies' College and Charterhouse School last December. I chose Charterhouse. :rolleyes:
Not only bacause of Charterhouse gives me academic exhibitions (the post delayed so CLC refused to give me the 40% scholarship. :eek: ),but also I don't like a single sex environment.
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BazTheMoney
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#73
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#73
(Original post by aliel)
Ooooh *so* disagree with that. The term luxury goods was widely used in late 80s and 90s to include such things as cars and computers. However, times have changed and the way in which a car and a PC is viewed has changed. A car is used by many as a means of earning money, in that a car is needed for them to travel to work where they will earn their living. The relative cost of a PC has much decreased over the last decade and again, is not viewed in the UK as a luxury good. I would have to disagree with your comment that "most people have fairly comfortable lives", the average person is in more debt than ever, having huge amounts of debt on top of your head does not enable the average person to live comfortably. Instead of getting a "second job", what has happened is that people work longer hours, do not have appropriate savings and/or take long-term loans/credit to fund their lifestyle.
Thank you for proving my point. Car are luxury goods, why? Because they aren't necessary for survival; the fact we know see them as a necessity shows that most people in this aren't poor. As for computers, what do they cost? £600, plus internet connection, comes to a total of £800; if many people are as poor as you make out that would be a months wages, it's luxury good, and the fact you said it's cheap only reinforces the fact that again, most people aren't poor in this country.

As for debt, like most people you've completely misunderstood the consequences; the fact Britain is now £1 trillion in debt is over hyped. So what? 70% of that is on mortgages. In fact, the fact the consumer is spending shows that times are good, people are secure in their position so are willing to make long term investments; that doesn't happen when people are struggling.

Most people are comfortable financial; don't get drawn in by the odd scare story.
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aliel
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#74
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#74
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
Thank you for proving my point. Car are luxury goods, why? Because they aren't necessary for survival; the fact we know see them as a necessity shows that most people in this aren't poor. As for computers, what do they cost? £600, plus internet connection, comes to a total of £800; if many people are as poor as you make out that would be a months wages, it's luxury good, and the fact you said it's cheap only reinforces the fact that again, most people aren't poor in this country.

As for debt, like most people you've completely misunderstood the consequences; the fact Britain is now £1 trillion in debt is over hyped. So what? 70% of that is on mortgages. In fact, the fact the consumer is spending shows that times are good, people are secure in their position so are willing to make long term investments; that doesn't happen when people are struggling.

Most people are comfortable financial; don't get drawn in by the odd scare story.
Only certain types of cars are "luxury goods" now, a car in itself is no longer a "luxury good" in the UK. In general, in an economic downturn a luxury good and therefore a company supplying luxury goods *should* in theory experience a decrease in sales. A car according to you is a luxury good, however as far as i am aware over the last two or so decades, car sales have increased year by year in the UK (through out upturns and downturns in the economy). According to general theory (that you are applying), clothes are seen as a neccessity, however, the existence of brand names such as Prada, Gucci etc have meant that the line between luxury and normal (neccessity) goods is not as clear in reality. This is what you have to recognise, it's too simplistic to just apply basic economic theory/ terms in this case. A car is most definitely a "luxury good" in third world countries now. But as you referred to in an earlier post, the average *combined* earnings in the UK (of a couple) mean that a car of a grand or two spread out over 6 years which enable a family to travel to work (as you know the average distance that a worker has to travel to work has much increased over the years) is not a "luxury".

The term "poor" within the UK can only be applied relatively when compared to poor countries around the world- however, when this is recognised it is as important to see that so can the term "luxury goods" etc.
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B00kwOrm
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#75
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#75
Meh, at least you've got good consumer spending and a really low rate of unemployment... Be happy about it. It's rather the opposite around here...
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BazTheMoney
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#76
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#76
(Original post by aliel)
Only certain types of cars are "luxury goods" now, a car in itself is no longer a "luxury good" in the UK. In general, in an economic downturn a luxury good and therefore a company supplying luxury goods *should* in theory experience a decrease in sales. A car according to you is a luxury good, however as far as i am aware over the last two or so decades, car sales have increased year by year in the UK (through out upturns and downturns in the economy). According to general theory (that you are applying), clothes are seen as a neccessity, however, the existence of brand names such as Prada, Gucci etc have meant that the line between luxury and normal (neccessity) goods is not as clear in reality. This is what you have to recognise, it's too simplistic to just apply basic economic theory/ terms in this case. A car is most definitely a "luxury good" in third world countries now. But as you referred to in an earlier post, the average *combined* earnings in the UK (of a couple) mean that a car of a grand or two spread out over 6 years which enable a family to travel to work (as you know the average distance that a worker has to travel to work has much increased over the years) is not a "luxury".

The term "poor" within the UK can only be applied relatively when compared to poor countries around the world- however, when this is recognised it is as important to see that so can the term "luxury goods" etc.
It been fun debating this, but it's going nowhere. A car is a luxury good, why? because it's has an IED greater than 1, thus it is income elastic.Also if things get tight, for example a recession, the car would be one of the first things to go. A car is luxury good, you're trying to bring it possibles to suggest it isn't, but it is; that's partly the reason why tax is so high on petrol.
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4Ed
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#77
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#77
i think it's time to return from economic debate of luxury goods back to the interpretation of CLC

certainly at my school, CLC had a pretty poor reputation, not quite 'Virgin Megastores', but pretty damning.





and regards this whole headstart for public schoolers, i agree with JJ that the competitiveness and higher demands of being in a boarding school often gives an advantage to the average public schooler, not to mention the old boy/girl network of social contacts - work experience comes much easier! I would not have found it as easy to get into the Magic Circle law firm Clifford Chance for my work exp if i'd been at a comp, even if i'd had an outstanding cv.
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aliel
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#78
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#78
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
It been fun debating this, but it's going nowhere. A car is a luxury good, why? because it's has an IED greater than 1, thus it is income elastic.Also if things get tight, for example a recession, the car would be one of the first things to go. A car is luxury good, you're trying to bring it possibles to suggest it isn't, but it is; that's partly the reason why tax is so high on petrol.
In theory (the world of the textbook) if we are to work out the income elasticity of demand of a product (in this case, a car) we would be able to determine whether a product would be purchased / or for gone. However, in the real world things don't strictly work like that. You say that "in a recession, the car would be one of the first things to go", this is simply not the case. A car, in the UK, is considered to be important in that it enables people to work. A foreign holiday is in fact "one of the first things to go" rather than a car.

And as for the purchase of petrol, it is inelastic, if the possession a car was a truly a luxury good (in the UK) than the rises in prices would be met with lower consumption- it is not.
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aliel
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#79
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#79
What i think you mean Baz, is that the purchase of a brand spanking new car is income elastic ( and obviously I am not disputing this).
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BazTheMoney
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#80
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#80
(Original post by aliel)
In theory (the world of the textbook) if we are to work out the income elasticity of demand of a product (in this case, a car) we would be able to determine whether a product would be purchased / or for gone. However, in the real world things don't strictly work like that. You say that "in a recession, the car would be one of the first things to go", this is simply not the case. A car, in the UK, is considered to be important in that it enables people to work. A foreign holiday is in fact "one of the first things to go" rather than a car.

And as for the purchase of petrol, it is inelastic, if the possession a car was a truly a luxury good (in the UK) than the rises in prices would be met with lower consumption- it is not.
In the world of the textbook and the mind of the Oxford Economics department, I'm correct. And a car would be one of the first things to go, or they would downgrade to an older, cheaper model. And you misunderstood the point about petrol, I was jumping from elascitity to fiscal policy; the reason tax on petrol is high is because the government realise that a car is a luxury and not the only form of transport avalible to a huge majority of the population.

You're being very brave here; going against someone who knows a lot more about this than you.
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