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Did anyone watch the Legion premiere? Totally amazing Watch

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    Did anyone else watch the Legion premiere? It's a mind-blowingly awesome adaptation of a Marvel comic about a paranoid schizophrenic mutant (in the X-Men universe), though it's only very loosely based on the comic. The show is completely bonkers, and a lot of people won't like it, but for those with patience and aesthetic sensibilities, it is deeply rewarding (at least, based on the single episode so far). I don't think this show could have been made ten years ago, and I suspect this might be the Breaking Bad of its day

    Here's the trailer

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    Literally just finished watching it 15 minutes ago. I enjoyed it a lot, even if some scenes were a little close to the bone for me personally. It was also pretty confusing at times but I plan on watching episode two next week.

    Out of interest, why wouldn't it have been made 10 years ago?
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Literally just finished watching it 15 minutes ago. I enjoyed it a lot, even if some scenes were a little close to the bone for me personally. It was also pretty confusing at times but I plan on watching episode two next week.

    Out of interest, why wouldn't it have been made 10 years ago?
    Television today is exceptionally good compared to what was around ten years ago, for two reasons.

    First, business. It used to be that in the US you had three television networks; ABC, CBS and NBC (joined by FOX as the fourth in the early 1990s). They had huge audiences, on any particular night they might have 150 million viewers between them. And this created a commercial imperative to make everything as bland and inoffensive as possible to appeal to the largest possible number of people. That effect was worsened by the fact that terrestrial television (broadcast television) in the US is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission; the fact that there's limited bandwidth means the airwaves are effectively a public commons, creating the justification for government licensure, which creates the opening for censorship and puritanism. And given how conservatives Americans are, the FCC appealed to the lowest common Christian denominator and there was no sex, no cursing and in actuality, very few interesting or innovative ideas on American TV (network TV is still like that today, all How I Met Your Mother and CSI crap)

    And then cable came along (really only in a big way in the early 1990s). As the number of channels that can be broadcast over cable are effectively unlimited, there is no justification for licensing and FCC control (just like the situation with newspapers, books, etc). Freed from these strictures, around 20 years ago you started to see the first "Golden Age of Television" shows start to get made and broadcast on cable (on HBO), like The Sopranos, Six Feet Under. And with these new innovative shows came critical acclaim and commercial success, and cable companies realised you can make serious money with only an audience of a few million, broadcasting really high quality shows. In the mid and late 2000s and early 2010s that accelerated with shows like Deadwood, Breaking Bad, The Americans, Game of Thrones, etc etc. And so as time has gone on, from television executives being unbelievably conservative and risk averse, over time they have become more and more willing to take risks, to commission interesting shows that might only have an audience of a million or two whereas in the old days of the 1970s and 1980s, a network show that dipped under 20 million viewers would get cancelled. More cable channels, the viewership split in many different directions, means many more shows getting made.

    The second reason is technology. The online streaming revolution (Netflix, Amazon) has made "cult" and "binge watch" shows quite profitable in syndication (i.e. after their first run on television, playing on streaming services). Technology has also made shows better in that even 20 years ago, shows were made on a crappy NTSC or PAL format, 4:3 aspect ratio. Now everything is widescreen and hi-def. And now CGI is so good that you can fairly cheaply create incredible and convincing effects (this is particularly useful if you are creating a historical setting).

    Ten years ago, we were really only at the end of the first era of the Golden Age of Television (The Sopranos and Deadwood were at the end of their run). The second era of the Golden Age had been shows like Breaking Bad, the Americans, Game of Thrones. We're now entering the third golden age, and television just keeps getting better and better. Ten years ago there were, like, three good shows on TV tops. There are now around 20.

    Television used to be the cheap cousin of cinema, now a lot of the talent is moving to television where you can tell really interesting long-form stories over 12 hours of a season rather than having 90 or 120 minutes to do it.

    Anyway, that's my take on it Bit of a history lesson in how the media business works.
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    AlexanderHam that was a very interesting read. Thank you for taking the time to explain it to me.
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    Anyone still watching it? The latest episode honestly had me crapping myself at the end :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
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    Started watching this last week and I'm also a huge fan so far. The ending to yesterday's episode was a bit of an odd one, so I'm curious what they're going to do with it next week. I also like how they're exploring David's DID and keeping it similar to the source material. I don't know that I'd call it the new Breaking Bad, but I'm definitely enjoying it so far.
 
 
 
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