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    A 16-year-old girl has been excluded from school, after being told her 'face was caked in make-up' and that it was inappropriate. :stupido3::headfire:

    Upon picking her up from school, her mum reportedly responded 'is that it!?' as she was shocked to see the lack of make-up on her daughter's face (and looking at the photo in the article, she does look relatively natural tbf).


    A lot of schools seem to have strict make-up policies, but does it really matter if student's choose to wear make-up?

    If it's improving confidence and not affecting studies, it seems pretty harmless.

    Do you think it's inappropriate to wear it to school? :hmmmm2:
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    Depends what type of school and how much makeup.

    E.g. At a failing state school, makeup is good. But at a private school, no makeup is good.
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    I don't think it's inappropriate to wear it to school. I think anything that would fly at work or college should be okay at school as well, at least for like year 9 upwards. As long as students aren't being late and reporting putting makeup on as the reason, I don't see any issues. Perhaps they should concentrate on things like bullying and mental health of students a bit more, instead of wasting so much time on things like this

    Schools punish students way too harshly for things like this. I got excluded because the pockets on my trousers made them look too casual, and because I have incredibly short legs (even too short for petite length), I had to have them taken up and it made them look slimmer in the leg which they didn't like. A guy in my year wore joggers and didn't get a second look
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    They should be free to do as they wish.
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    No it isn't. Pupils are there to learn it's not a fashion parade. They should respect the rules or find one that allows pupils to wear make-up, which is a distraction and also another thing pupils can get competitive about.
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    It didn't look excessive from the picture, but then some teens have acne which could/may cause confidence issues. I think as long as it looks natural (like using concealer to cover spots) should be fine. It seems very unfair for her if she's about to take GCSE's in about 5 months and she's been expelled for that.

    There are 2 local high schools in my town my school was the one which didn't allow you to wear make-up until year 10/11 even then you couldn't wear a lot - the other school allowed year 7's to wear full on foundation and other make up (if thats the right term?) and it looked kinda silly because it wasn't even put on correctly...
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    (Original post by discobish)
    A 16-year-old girl has been excluded from school, after being told her 'face was caked in make-up' and that it was inappropriate. :stupido3::headfire:

    Upon picking her up from school, her mum reportedly responded 'is that it!?' as she was shocked to see the lack of make-up on her daughter's face (and looking at the photo in the article, she does look relatively natural tbf).


    A lot of schools seem to have strict make-up policies, but does it really matter if student's choose to wear make-up?

    If it's improving confidence and not affecting studies, it seems pretty harmless.

    Do you think it's inappropriate to wear it to school? :hmmmm2:
    No. I never understood why schools don't allow makeup, I wore makeup to school all the time
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    Eyebrow game on point though, nothing wrong with that. How is that caked :rofl:
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    (Original post by discobish)
    A 16-year-old girl has been excluded from school, after being told her 'face was caked in make-up' and that it was inappropriate. :stupido3::headfire:

    Upon picking her up from school, her mum reportedly responded 'is that it!?' as she was shocked to see the lack of make-up on her daughter's face (and looking at the photo in the article, she does look relatively natural tbf).


    A lot of schools seem to have strict make-up policies, but does it really matter if student's choose to wear make-up?

    If it's improving confidence and not affecting studies, it seems pretty harmless.

    Do you think it's inappropriate to wear it to school? :hmmmm2:
    Good question.

    I think your answer to this is going to entirely depend on whether you're a student/parent or teacher. Lots of kids and their parents think that make-up and so forth is entirely unrelated to learning - so long as the kid is working hard and learning, then what does it matter how much slap they've got on? Talk to a teacher, and it's about creating a 'learning environment' where everyone plays by the rules and a certain standard of dress and appearance is enforced. Discipline like this, they say, feeds into an overall increase in behaviour standards and, thus, increased work and productivity.

    I am inclined to agree with the Teachers here. Most secondary teachers are professionals, and interpret the rules somewhat flexibly. A girl who's working hard, has a good attitude and good attendance is probably likely to be forgiven the old uniform violation regarding make-up or nails. But a disruptive, unruly child who comes in dressed like a streetwalker is going to get shorter shrift. Overall, it is a school, not a cocktail party, and there needs to be some restrictions on things like hair, make-up and uniform for good reason.
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    How absolutely ridiculous. She didn't even have that much on - you see much more on Year 7s thinking they're makeup artists or whatever. Just stupid.

    Some people feel really insecure with a bare face that as little as a bit of mascara or foundation helps with. It's not "inappropriate", she's 16. It's not "disrupting studies", excluding her, however, is.

    Surely the school should be focusing on the bigger issue here - the article mentions she had to take 2 days off school due to bullying. So...they'll exclude her for doing her eyebrows but won't help her feel included when she is there? Priorities seem a bit backwards if you ask me.
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    She's at one of them failing state schools with a headteacher who went to an ex poly uni
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    At my school having hair down was banned, as was make up, supposedly, but a lot of girls in my year turned up with this tasteless, orange foundation mask, which would run as sticky orange sweat in PE lessons. I think it one of those things where a blanket ban on the stuff isn't really necessary, but it relies on the pupil applying it at their own discretion, making sure it's tasteful and subtle enough to be appropriate. I never wore makeup to school, but in retrospect, I think a bit of concealer and a light tinted moisturiser would have done me good- I suffered badly with acne which used to knock my confidence. I think eyeliner, eyeshadow and bright lipstick steps the mark- it's not necessary.
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    I think girls should be able to wear basic make up to school. During your teen years you can be really self conscious and for some girls, makeup can act as a security blanket. Also, with the change in hormones, lots of secondary school kids get acne or spots for the first time and this can be crippling for someone's confidence. Yes, if is important that your confidence isn't closely tied to the way you look, but sometimes this comes with age and if there is anything that can be done to help you through those awkward years and it's not harming anyone, I don't see the issue.
    However, I do object to bright lipstick or eyeshadow as that is unnecessary

    In regards to the girl in the article... #eyebrowsonfleek.
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    Rules are rules really
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    They're going to wear makeup in the workplace. why not let them practise now and get it down?
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    I thought the photograph was going to be something more like what I wore to school (I wore soooo much black shadow and eyeliner when I was 14-16 in addition to heavy foundation/concealer) but that's rather tame!

    Absolutely for it. I was so glad when I changed schools from one that didn't allow make-up to one that didn't have any rules about it. I absolutely hated my appearance until my late teens and wasn't comfortable leaving the house without wearing make-up.
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    (Original post by discobish)
    A 16-year-old girl has been excluded from school, after being told her 'face was caked in make-up' and that it was inappropriate. :stupido3::headfire:

    Upon picking her up from school, her mum reportedly responded 'is that it!?' as she was shocked to see the lack of make-up on her daughter's face (and looking at the photo in the article, she does look relatively natural tbf).


    A lot of schools seem to have strict make-up policies, but does it really matter if student's choose to wear make-up?

    If it's improving confidence and not affecting studies, it seems pretty harmless.

    Do you think it's inappropriate to wear it to school? :hmmmm2:
    Stupid decision to exclude her imho; most females in the real world wear make up and it improves confidence. There are more important things to worry about
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    No it isn't. Pupils are there to learn it's not a fashion parade. They should respect the rules or find one that allows pupils to wear make-up, which is a distraction and also another thing pupils can get competitive about.
    We should encourage the youth to take pride in their appearance, and I appreciate that there is a fine line, or even grey area between vanity and presentation.

    When I was younger, I'd get out of bed with thick messy bedhair and even after a shower/combing it would still be all over the place. So I used to gel it. It's an activity that took me no more than 5 minutes and I wouldn't give it any more thought. Soon, the teachers then started to make me wash it out because it was labelled 'arrogant', 'vain', and 'distracting'.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    We should encourage the youth to take pride in their appearance, and I appreciate that there is a fine line, or even grey area between vanity and presentation.

    When I was younger, I'd get out of bed with thick messy bedhair and even after a shower/combing it would still be all over the place. So I used to gel it. It's an activity that took me no more than 5 minutes and I wouldn't give it any more thought. Soon, the teachers then started to make me wash it out because it was labelled 'arrogant', 'vain', and 'distracting'.
    Ofc they can, just without make-up.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Ofc they can, just without make-up.
    I don't think many teenage girls would be comfortable with that.
 
 
 
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