Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I created this thread in the physics forum as well but I think some Engineers of TSR may also be able to help as Young's modulus is a calculation that is heavily used in engineering. So I've just copied and pasted from my previous thread. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

    So I'm doing a project for my advanced higher physics and one of the ways I have used to calculate Young's modulus of a mild steel wire is by Searle's method. I have already calculated it using the equations stress/strain but in my instructions sheet it told me to plot mass(x-axis) against change in length(y-axis) which I have done and it says that the gradient of the graph can also be used to calculate Young's modulus. The units I used for mass were kg and for change in length it was mm. Can anyone help me with calculating it by using the gradient of the graph ? And also should it be mm on the y-axis or something different because my gradient was like 0.161 which seems way too small a value to be used for a calculation. Cheers.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 10, 2017
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.