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    (Original post by honestly)
    For Medicine: Chemistry and Biology (for a small number only chemistry is mandatory - but a competitive application should have at least two sciences.) are well chosen, try and aim for A* or As in those subjects.
    Even if you change your mind and apply for certain social sciences like Law or Politics, top grades in the sciences will set you apart from other applicants with all essay based A levels. It will show your technical and reasoning aptitude and an ability to deal with complex ideas, theories and an ability to absorb them.

    I would change Psychology with either Eng Lit, History, Classics, RE or something similar. if you enjoy any of the aforementioned; they are rigorous. And the only non science subject, in my view, should be a traditional essay based subject to prove your ability to take in huge volumes of information and be able to use it in essays and answering question ets etc.

    Theres nothing disadvantageous about psychology.

    ---It's surprising how many people are getting into top universities from public schools with one of their three A levels in less traditional subjects such as Government and Politics or Psychology. I'm not taking hits at those who study such subjects. I myself studied Government and Politics as a forth A level.

    Overall the three you have chosen are brilliant! and hopefully you will perform well in examinations. As for the fourth subject I would seriously consider a traditional essay based subject. With top grades (A*-B) in all those subjects you will leave your options open and will show the Admissions tutor your an able student.

    Hope this helps!
    This is great thank you - it's very helpful. As for changing psychology to an essay based subject I was under the impression that there were essays and long questions etc. in psychology... But I really enjoy French, even though that wasn't one you said would you say that was a good option as my fourth option?
    If you don't mind me asking, what did you take at A level and what career are you pursuing? Thanks again 😄
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    (Original post by A0l1v3rx)
    This is great thank you - it's very helpful. As for changing psychology to an essay based subject I was under the impression that there were essays and long questions etc. in psychology... But I really enjoy French, even though that wasn't one you said would you say that was a good option as my fourth option?
    If you don't mind me asking, what did you take at A level and what career are you pursuing? Thanks again 😄
    It's true to say psychology includes essays, but it's also true to say the traditional essay subjects include a rigorous curriculum. They are marked with more ferocity and encourage a clear pattern of thinking, precision in argument and encourage becoming at one with wider subject matter. They have been the staple traditional academic subjects. This is a broad analysis, i know.

    As I say this is only the case because of your other three being science based and you want to show that you can cope with arduous essay writing and long examinations.

    French would be a much better replacement and a wise choice. Universities do like a good old modern language; such as UCL. Plus it is rigorous and shows your ability to learn and communicate using another set of semantics, vocabulary, syntax and an ability to contextualise ideas and thoughts in another language.

    French sounds good to me.

    me? History, Theology, Literature & Government and Politics

    (I changed my subjects a gazillion times; Geography, IT, Classics, Economics and maths! what was i thinking doing maths)
    Alas this was quiet some time ago; I had offers to study Law. Instead I chose a new life course.

    (For work now I'm a part time software engineer. I also run a small bookkeeping business.) Not too bad for a non grad!
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    Psych isn't inherently disadvantageous but the opportunity cost of taking something else has to be accounted for;

    Languages tend to be universally valued and unlike most academic subjects, language ability later in life is still useful when you're well beyond A-level standard (provided you keep it up).

    Analytical essay subjects like Economics, Geography, and History are all reasonable choices, as they develop more "technical" writing skills that are more akin to the kind of scientific reading and writing you might do as a physician or surgeon. English lit on the other hand, is more interpretive and arguably less useful. Either way learning to write extended prose is useful.

    Maths is always useful and valued, at pretty much every level; it'd be particularly useful if a) you're thinking you might just go into a general science area at uni or b) consider pursuing academic medicine in particular (although it's still useful for any medic to have a basic grasp of calculus and statistics)

    If you're considering medicine look at the unis entry requirements and application suggestions. Some seem to like a "contrasting" subject, like UCL, while others like Cambridge prefer three sciences (or maths, and this typically excludes psychology).

    For psychology courses, none that I know of require psychology, and several seem to prefer students don't take psychology due to differences in how it's taught at A-level standard. From the sounds of it, Biology is a good choice, and Chemistry would be a strongly recommended co-requisite for further study in anything biologically related. If you want to take psychology though, go ahead and do so! Few bioscience courses require maths A-level, and only some Chemistry courses do. Similarly a lot of humanities and social science courses don't require any particular A-levels (for example, psych, sociology, economics, sometimes geography) so you're fairly open on this front.

    Perhaps a better way to consider is which you find easiest to take exams in. If you get stressed in oral exams, maybe don't take a language; if you have a tendency to run out of time in essay based exams, avoid these. This will probably go more to making sure you get the best grades you can than anything else :P Similarly if you don't want to spend many hours a week reading texts (both the source text and related essays and so on) you might not enjoy history/english/so on, and if you get bored solving calculator based problem sheets and writing lab reports, sciences may be less enjoyable for you.
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    (Original post by honestly)
    It's true to say psychology includes essays, but it's also true to say the traditional essay subjects include a rigorous curriculum. They are marked with more ferocity and encourage a clear pattern of thinking, precision in argument and encourage becoming at one with wider subject matter. They have been the staple traditional academic subjects. This is a broad analysis, i know.

    As I say this is only the case because of your other three being science based and you want to show that you can cope with arduous essay writing and long examinations.

    French would be a much better replacement and a wise choice. Universities do like a good old modern language; such as UCL. Plus it is rigorous and shows your ability to learn and communicate using another set of semantics, vocabulary, syntax and an ability to contextualise ideas and thoughts in another language.

    French sounds good to me.

    me? History, Theology, Literature & Government and Politics

    (I changed my subjects a gazillion times; Geography, IT, Classics, Economics and maths! what was i thinking doing maths)
    Alas this was quiet some time ago; I had offers to study Law. Instead I chose a new life course.

    (For work now I'm a part time software engineer. I also run a small bookkeeping business.) Not too bad for a non grad!
    Thanks you've helped me a lot
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Psych isn't inherently disadvantageous but the opportunity cost of taking something else has to be accounted for;

    Languages tend to be universally valued and unlike most academic subjects, language ability later in life is still useful when you're well beyond A-level standard (provided you keep it up).

    Analytical essay subjects like Economics, Geography, and History are all reasonable choices, as they develop more "technical" writing skills that are more akin to the kind of scientific reading and writing you might do as a physician or surgeon. English lit on the other hand, is more interpretive and arguably less useful. Either way learning to write extended prose is useful.

    Maths is always useful and valued, at pretty much every level; it'd be particularly useful if a) you're thinking you might just go into a general science area at uni or b) consider pursuing academic medicine in particular (although it's still useful for any medic to have a basic grasp of calculus and statistics)

    If you're considering medicine look at the unis entry requirements and application suggestions. Some seem to like a "contrasting" subject, like UCL, while others like Cambridge prefer three sciences (or maths, and this typically excludes psychology).

    For psychology courses, none that I know of require psychology, and several seem to prefer students don't take psychology due to differences in how it's taught at A-level standard. From the sounds of it, Biology is a good choice, and Chemistry would be a strongly recommended co-requisite for further study in anything biologically related. If you want to take psychology though, go ahead and do so! Few bioscience courses require maths A-level, and only some Chemistry courses do. Similarly a lot of humanities and social science courses don't require any particular A-levels (for example, psych, sociology, economics, sometimes geography) so you're fairly open on this front.

    Perhaps a better way to consider is which you find easiest to take exams in. If you get stressed in oral exams, maybe don't take a language; if you have a tendency to run out of time in essay based exams, avoid these. This will probably go more to making sure you get the best grades you can than anything else :P Similarly if you don't want to spend many hours a week reading texts (both the source text and related essays and so on) you might not enjoy history/english/so on, and if you get bored solving calculator based problem sheets and writing lab reports, sciences may be less enjoyable for you.
    Thank you for the reply, I haven't thought about which exams I do best in so that's great advice I'll definitely think about it!
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Psych isn't inherently disadvantageous but the opportunity cost of taking something else has to be accounted for;

    Languages tend to be universally valued and unlike most academic subjects, language ability later in life is still useful when you're well beyond A-level standard (provided you keep it up).

    Analytical essay subjects like Economics, Geography, and History are all reasonable choices, as they develop more "technical" writing skills that are more akin to the kind of scientific reading and writing you might do as a physician or surgeon. English lit on the other hand, is more interpretive and arguably less useful. Either way learning to write extended prose is useful.

    Maths is always useful and valued, at pretty much every level; it'd be particularly useful if a) you're thinking you might just go into a general science area at uni or b) consider pursuing academic medicine in particular (although it's still useful for any medic to have a basic grasp of calculus and statistics)

    If you're considering medicine look at the unis entry requirements and application suggestions. Some seem to like a "contrasting" subject, like UCL, while others like Cambridge prefer three sciences (or maths, and this typically excludes psychology).

    For psychology courses, none that I know of require psychology, and several seem to prefer students don't take psychology due to differences in how it's taught at A-level standard. From the sounds of it, Biology is a good choice, and Chemistry would be a strongly recommended co-requisite for further study in anything biologically related. If you want to take psychology though, go ahead and do so! Few bioscience courses require maths A-level, and only some Chemistry courses do. Similarly a lot of humanities and social science courses don't require any particular A-levels (for example, psych, sociology, economics, sometimes geography) so you're fairly open on this front.

    Perhaps a better way to consider is which you find easiest to take exams in. If you get stressed in oral exams, maybe don't take a language; if you have a tendency to run out of time in essay based exams, avoid these. This will probably go more to making sure you get the best grades you can than anything else :P Similarly if you don't want to spend many hours a week reading texts (both the source text and related essays and so on) you might not enjoy history/english/so on, and if you get bored solving calculator based problem sheets and writing lab reports, sciences may be less enjoyable for you.
    ... and I thought my response was good; this is brilliant!
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    If you're considering medicine look at the unis entry requirements and application suggestions. Some seem to like a "contrasting" subject, like UCL, while others like Cambridge prefer three sciences (or maths, and this typically excludes psychology).
    UCL no longer states a preference for a contrasting subject and to my knowledge there is no other uni that does or ever did.

    Cambridge is the only uni to require 3 sciences/maths.

    Chem bio and another is generally sufficient. The only caveat is that there is some evidence that maths helps slightly with taking the BMAT, which is a test required for a handful of unis. You might be able to overcome this with adequate preparation though.
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    (Original post by A0l1v3rx)
    This is really helpful I appreciate it, and I was thinking of dropping one at AS but a lot are changing to the linear course so I wouldn't be able to, it depends on the sixth form I choose. Thank you!
    I am doing AQA new spec, all linear, and we can all drop a subject if we choose. If whichever sixth form you go to takes AS exams as a sort of "mock" as we did, then you can drop a subject. If not, you can request to take the AS exam, ask the school
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    (Original post by YselklaHosking)
    I am doing AQA new spec, all linear, and we can all drop a subject if we choose. If whichever sixth form you go to takes AS exams as a sort of "mock" as we did, then you can drop a subject. If not, you can request to take the AS exam, ask the school
    I didn't realise this so thanks I'll look into it more
 
 
 
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