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    Currently doing History as one of my A level subjects and i'm looking for an efficient way to revise/ study its contents and information. If you're wondering, i'm doing AS edexcel option E, Russia 1917-91 from Lenin to Yeltsin (Paper 1), and Mao's China 1949-76 (Paper 2). Anything from revision notes, revision techniques and all that good stuff would help massively! Thanks!
    (Also, any help on answering exam questions would be awesome since i'm struggling on how to format and structure my answers to get in those top bands)
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    (Original post by Karoomy)
    Currently doing History as one of my A level subjects and i'm looking for an efficient way to revise/ study its contents and information. If you're wondering, i'm doing AS edexcel option E, Russia 1917-91 from Lenin to Yeltsin (Paper 1), and Mao's China 1949-76 (Paper 2). Anything from revision notes, revision techniques and all that good stuff would help massively! Thanks!
    (Also, any help on answering exam questions would be awesome since i'm struggling on how to format and structure my answers to get in those top bands)
    I don't do either of those topics, but I'd recommend going through your notes and typing them up in a comprehensive way so they're easy to look through. If you're struggling with dates (a good way to include detail which will help you up into the top bands) then going through all your notes and typing those dates up will also help.

    I would revise in sections, doing one section at a time before taking a short break, doing the next section, etc. It gives you time to breathe and your brain will be able to retain the information a little better.

    Exam questions: I'm going to assume you have a source question and an essay question, those are the ones I know how to do a little.

    Source question: a short intro, try and make this one about what the sources are about. If they're about foreign policy under Stalin, you can say that there were successes and failures in European policy due to a mixed response to communism across Europe. You could then reference what the source is about specifically and say a fact about it.

    You'd then move on to the sources. I think in Edexcel we have to compare two? But I've also seen AS questions where you only talk about one. If you're comparing, try and put the sources in the same paragraph rather than separately. It's good to deal with them thematically rather than systematically.

    When analysing a source, try to think of some key things: what is the source? Is it a photo? News article? Speech? Think of the inherent benefits and detractions of these things. A photo is good because it visually shows us what happens, but they can be set up, doctored, or interpreted in a different way. A speech provides valuable insight into the official viewpoint of the person making it, but it may not give actual facts as there will always be a purpose to the speech.

    You can then move on to analysing its purpose, and how this affects whether you think much can be learned from it because of this. Why does this source say what it does? Are the people who wrote it trying to convince other people of something? A good way to get extra marks is to think about how what it says matches up with the facts you know. If your source is something on the Molotov Ribbentrop agreement/pact thing and it's saying that their interests line up or they've resolved their differences, you can add your knowledge about the ideological differences between Nazism and Communism and how anti-Bolshevik the Nazis were. This tells you that what the source is saying is unreliable and you get loads of marks for it.

    Woah this is getting really long. Would you like me to message you some more advice or something?
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    (Original post by StevetheIcecube)
    I don't do either of those topics, but I'd recommend going through your notes and typing them up in a comprehensive way so they're easy to look through. If you're struggling with dates (a good way to include detail which will help you up into the top bands) then going through all your notes and typing those dates up will also help.

    I would revise in sections, doing one section at a time before taking a short break, doing the next section, etc. It gives you time to breathe and your brain will be able to retain the information a little better.

    Exam questions: I'm going to assume you have a source question and an essay question, those are the ones I know how to do a little.

    Source question: a short intro, try and make this one about what the sources are about. If they're about foreign policy under Stalin, you can say that there were successes and failures in European policy due to a mixed response to communism across Europe. You could then reference what the source is about specifically and say a fact about it.

    You'd then move on to the sources. I think in Edexcel we have to compare two? But I've also seen AS questions where you only talk about one. If you're comparing, try and put the sources in the same paragraph rather than separately. It's good to deal with them thematically rather than systematically.

    When analysing a source, try to think of some key things: what is the source? Is it a photo? News article? Speech? Think of the inherent benefits and detractions of these things. A photo is good because it visually shows us what happens, but they can be set up, doctored, or interpreted in a different way. A speech provides valuable insight into the official viewpoint of the person making it, but it may not give actual facts as there will always be a purpose to the speech.

    You can then move on to analysing its purpose, and how this affects whether you think much can be learned from it because of this. Why does this source say what it does? Are the people who wrote it trying to convince other people of something? A good way to get extra marks is to think about how what it says matches up with the facts you know. If your source is something on the Molotov Ribbentrop agreement/pact thing and it's saying that their interests line up or they've resolved their differences, you can add your knowledge about the ideological differences between Nazism and Communism and how anti-Bolshevik the Nazis were. This tells you that what the source is saying is unreliable and you get loads of marks for it.

    Woah this is getting really long. Would you like me to message you some more advice or something?
    This is so helpful, thanks mate! I haven't come across any picture sources so far, it's all been either speech, article etc. and I have yet to come across a question where it wants us to compare two sources.
    Also, i'd love some more advice! Message me anything else you think will help me improve on this subject as I really want to get an A by the end of the year.
 
 
 
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