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Fed up with no reply from job application for over a month- so sent them this Watch

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    After a month of waiting and no answer despite follow up email, I sent them this:

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    I applied about a month ago for the position of _______ at ________. Having not heard anything back in weeks, I then followed up with an email, sent on the _______, politely inquiring what the situation was. I still haven't heard anything back. I didn't assume that I would be shortlisted, however, I made a lot of effort in my application and I was at least expecting a standard rejection email, as a matter of common courtesy.
    I have been a loyal Volunteer at [the same organization] for over a year, though I have been finding it difficult to come in lately due to the cold weather and lack of heating in the [place of volunteering]. However, I find it disheartening that my emails have so far gone completely ignored. I didn't want to appear to be too persistent and so I have avoided emailing you for several weeks. I understand that you probably received hundreds of applications, however it wouldn't have taken you much time to simply write a standard rejection letter to send to all the unsuccessful candidates. I was excited at the possibility of working as a ________ and I believe I could have been a good employee, but your lack of response has put me off. Should more vacancies arise in _______, I will not put myself through the trouble of applying again.

    Yours sincerely,

    x

    Too much?
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    You've burnt a bridge but on the other hand people might respect you for not being easily steamrolled. Your call I guess. It's not standard practice and possibly a bit immature but I secretly respect your gall lol!
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    After a month of waiting and no answer despite follow up email, I sent them this:

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    I applied about a month ago for the position of _______ at ________. Having not heard anything back in weeks, I then followed up with an email, sent on the _______, politely inquiring what the situation was. I still haven't heard anything back. I didn't assume that I would be shortlisted, however, I made a lot of effort in my application and I was at least expecting a standard rejection email, as a matter of common courtesy.
    I have been a loyal Volunteer at [the same organization] for over a year, though I have been finding it difficult to come in lately due to the cold weather and lack of heating in the [place of volunteering]. However, I find it disheartening that my emails have so far gone completely ignored. I didn't want to appear to be too persistent and so I have avoided emailing you for several weeks. I understand that you probably received hundreds of applications, however it wouldn't have taken you much time to simply write a standard rejection letter to send to all the unsuccessful candidates. I was excited at the possibility of working as a ________ and I believe I could have been a good employee, but your lack of response has put me off. Should more vacancies arise in _______, I will not put myself through the trouble of applying again.

    Yours sincerely,

    x

    Too much?
    A bit too much tbh, a lot of places don't send a standard rejection email.
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    You've burnt a bridge but on the other hand people might respect you for not being easily steamrolled. Your call I guess. It's not standard practice and possibly a bit immature but I secretly respect your gall lol!
    Thanks. This is an organisation I volunteer for and I spent hours on the application. It's not just posting your CV, I had to answer about a page of questions like you would in an interview. So I guess it just got to me that after all that they can't even be bothered to send a standard reply. I wouldn't ordinarily send an email like this if I don't hear back, but it's a charity I was proud to be part of and I've given a lot of my free time to them, all for nothing it would seem.
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    Companies aren't obliged to send you a rejection email and you have made yourself sound quite desperate.
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    (Original post by sameehaiqbal)
    Companies aren't obliged to send you a rejection email and you have made yourself sound quite desperate.
    Desperate how? I made it quite clear I wasn't expecting to be shortlisted. How long would it have taken them to reply? Two minutes? Maybe less?
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    Desperate how? I made it quite clear I wasn't expecting to be shortlisted. How long would it have taken them to reply? Two minutes? Maybe less?
    But if it's been more than a month then I doubt they've shortlisted you anyway, so what was an e-mail going to prove? It just proved you can't take rejection and need to send an e-mail to validate that. Also, now you have ruined your chances of at all getting a job at that company should they have put your application to the side for the future.

    You need to improve your attitude and take rejection more professionally. Again, companies are not obliged to send you unsuccessful letters.
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    I've been in the same position and it's so annoying, especially when you're applying for others and cannot accept another position without hearing back! They will either read it and appreciate your passion and courage haha or think you're immature. I have held back from writing that email so many times so major respect but if they haven't replied to your others, they most probably won't reply to this either so I wouldn't worry.
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    Did you post your initial application or email?

    If you volunteer for them you could have followed it up by asking your volunteers co-ordinator to check they received it.

    A month isn't a long time...
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    (Original post by sameehaiqbal)
    But if it's been more than a month then I doubt they've shortlisted you anyway, so what was an e-mail going to prove? It just proved you can't take rejection and need to send an e-mail to validate that. Also, now you have ruined your chances of at all getting a job at that company should they have put your application to the side for the future.

    You need to improve your attitude and take rejection more professionally. Again, companies are not obliged to send you unsuccessful letters.
    It proves that I won't be steamrolled, as someone else said. Tired of employers thinking they can make candidates feel worthless after having dedicated so much time to them.
    I don't care that I've sacrificed my chances, I wouldn't work for them now.
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    you can kiss both the paid role and your volunteerring goodbye.

    why didn;t you ask your current line manager given they are i nthe chain of command ?
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    It proves that I won't be steamrolled, as someone else said. Tired of employers thinking they can make candidates feel worthless after having dedicated so much time to them.
    I don't care that I've sacrificed my chances, I wouldn't work for them now.
    You haven't been steamrollered. You just haven't heard anything. Yes employers can do a better job of acknowledging applicants but tbf when they have, say, 100s of applicants that can be a problem for them (especially if they are a small employer or charity (I note they use volunteers...)).

    Are you currently employed?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Did you post your initial application or email?

    If you volunteer for them you could have followed it up by asking your volunteers co-ordinator to check they received it.

    A month isn't a long time...
    I know how they work, she would have just told me to email recruitment. Which I did.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    You haven't been steamrollered. You just haven't heard anything. Yes employers can do a better job of acknowledging applicants but tbf when they have, say, 100s of applicants that can be a problem for them (especially if they are a small employer or charity (I note they use volunteers...)).

    Are you currently employed?
    It's not hard for them to reply, they just have to write a standard email and CC it to everyone. Doesn't take long.
    No I'm not employed. Hence why I'm looking.
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    After a month of waiting and no answer despite follow up email, I sent them this:

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    I applied about a month ago for the position of _______ at ________. Having not heard anything back in weeks, I then followed up with an email, sent on the _______, politely inquiring what the situation was. I still haven't heard anything back. I didn't assume that I would be shortlisted, however, I made a lot of effort in my application and I was at least expecting a standard rejection email, as a matter of common courtesy.
    I have been a loyal Volunteer at [the same organization] for over a year, though I have been finding it difficult to come in lately due to the cold weather and lack of heating in the [place of volunteering]. However, I find it disheartening that my emails have so far gone completely ignored. I didn't want to appear to be too persistent and so I have avoided emailing you for several weeks. I understand that you probably received hundreds of applications, however it wouldn't have taken you much time to simply write a standard rejection letter to send to all the unsuccessful candidates. I was excited at the possibility of working as a ________ and I believe I could have been a good employee, but your lack of response has put me off. Should more vacancies arise in _______, I will not put myself through the trouble of applying again.

    Yours sincerely,

    x

    Too much?

    Too much and too petulant.
    Why didnt you just call them?

    My advice is (if you wanted an interview), then ring them up on Monday , find out whats happening and at the same time get someone to delete your e-mail/ disregard it. The trouble is not the e-mail but more the way you worded it and how you come across as a result. If you choose not to contact them, then notch it down to experience and dont worry about it. keep going.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I know how they work, she would have just told me to email recruitment. Which I did.
    Why anon?

    Alternatively, after a week or so you would then say you did that but hadn't heard anything

    - and she would say don't worry they will be in touch

    and you say nah I can't be bothered. I'll give it another couple of weeks and then I'll send a stroppy note instead

    - and she would say:

    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    No I'm not employed. Hence why I'm looking.
    Good luck with that.
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    That was really daft. A month is not an unusual length of time for an application to be processed, especially if you got your application in well before the deadline or if they don't give a date by which they'd contact you.

    What have you gained from actually sending this? Nothing. What happens when you're not feeling so bitter and see a post you really do want to go for? What if they were just still processing the "hundreds" of applications?

    Believe me, I get that it is frustrating and disheartening. I lost track of the number of job application I never heard back from, it took me 18 months to get a single interview for a paid role. I got turned down for volunteer roles, but you do not then write a *****y e-mail to the organisation, all you do is burn a bridge, potentially more bridges than you realise.
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    Lol, sorry to burst your bubble but so many places dont send out rejectiion letters. Why do you feel entitled to one or need one anyway? what does it matter? I've applied to quite a few jobs and not received one, you just take it on the chin and move on, try figure out your weaknesses to improve your application for next time.
    And also, loads of applications take hours to complete with CV, cover letter and related questions - it's not special.
    I wouldn't recommend you do this with any other applications, as you would seriously jeopardise your chances of getting a position in the future.
    Getting a job isn't easy and the world isn't fair - maybe this will help you figure that out.

    Also, sometimes places keep CVs on record if similar positions open up, but you've now ruined that chance. if you were so eager to find out about your rejection, why not email asking for some rejection feedback so that you can improve? to show your motivation etc? in a polite way though...
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    ...all you do is burn a bridge, potentially more bridges than you realise.
    Indeed - particularly if this is a specialist sector. Also memories can be long and hiring managers change employers bringing their memory with them.
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    lol it would be funny if they just ignored this one as well
 
 
 
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