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How to talk to the GP about depression? Watch

    • #1
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    Hi,
    for the past two years I've always felt so down. Idk sixth form has caused it but i really do hate sixth form and the teachers. Especially since some of thing treat me like I'm stupid and pick on me. My parents know I had these 'low' moments but we've never really used to word 'depressed', I guess they're just trying to avoid mentioning it as a possibility as much as possible. But i'm feeling even worse now, especially with exams coming soon. I'm not sure if I'm depressed but I always feel so lonely, I'm so stressed, I eat so much and I hardly get any sleep, and I'm generally just so unhappy. I find myself crying at some nights, like right now as I'm typing this, but no one really knows how awful I feel. I tend to keep most of it myself because I'm sure people will just say the usual 'just stay positive' or 'stay strong' but I've tried so hard to change. I have no motivation for my exams and just life in general. I did really well for my GCSEs and got all A*s but for AS i've basically got U's . I've had thoughts of not wanting to live anymore but I know I'd never do that so I guess thats not that serious. I don't self harm. Maybe its just 'teen angst' , but I just know that I hate this feeling.

    TLDR: I just want to talk to a GP to see if I'm depressed, but I'm really awkward to talk about these things and I wouldn't know how to start the conversation and talk about this. Do I just say "I think I might be depressed?'. I also don't want to go with my parents, just on my own.
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    What's stressing you?
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    GPs are not going to think you're awkward. Literally just say what you wrote in your post; GPs have been doing this for years. Elaborate on your feelings, of course, and why you think you may be depressed. A GP is much more than a medical professional, they're a person you can go to with literally anything.
    • #1
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    (Original post by Laughh3)
    What's stressing you?
    Sixth Form as a whole I guess, but everyone has that stress so I guess its nothing out of the ordinary.
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    [QUOTE=Anonymous;70048782]Hi,
    Especially since some of thing treat me like I'm stupid and pick on me.

    Maybe that's why. Maybe the teachers/students treating you like you are stupid is really getting to you? You said you feel lonely, do you have any friends?

    Talk to your GP but also try to solve it as medication is not always the best solution.
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    Just explain to them how you're feeling, what you wrote in your OP is fine. Remember, they will have seen cases like this many times before and they're trained to know what to do about it so they're absolutely not going to make it awkward. Tell them what you think the problem is, and answer their questions as honestly as you can.
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    [QUOTE=Laughh3;70049484]
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi,
    Especially since some of thing treat me like I'm stupid and pick on me.

    Maybe that's why. Maybe the teachers/students treating you like you are stupid is really getting to you? You said you feel lonely, do you have any friends?

    Talk to your GP but also try to solve it as medication is not always the best solution.
    It's just mainly one teacher. She stopped being so unfair to me for a while when my parents had a word with her, but she's started being horrible again. It creates a whole domino effect and so the other teachers started disliking me too last year, because of her , but not so much now.

    And yes I have quite a few friends surprisingly, but i don't even see the point of socialising any more, not really in the mood for it. I literally go to school, go home, attempt to revise but fail to, then sleep late.I go out with family sometimes, but don't really like going out with my friends and makeup excuses not to go.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Just explain to them how you're feeling, what you wrote in your OP is fine. Remember, they will have seen cases like this many times before and they're trained to know what to do about it so they're absolutely not going to make it awkward. Tell them what you think the problem is, and answer their questions as honestly as you can.
    I'm just worried about bursting into tears and then be unable to explain myself very well and just give the GP the impression that I'm just over reacting since nothing significantly bad has happened in my life, compared to some people.
    • #2
    #2

    To me it sounds like stress because I felt like that throughout the whole of sixth forms and as soon as I finished my last A2 exam and went on summer holidays I felt much much better. BUT if you think it's more than that, and you're worried, do go to the GP.

    Start by making an appointment, some people feel better if they make it ASAP so they get it over and done with because waiting can make them anxious, others want the time to prepare and get their nerves together so when you want it depends on how you feel. I would make a list of your symptoms, just like you wrote in this thread. Write everything down in bullet points, just so when you go in you remember everything you want to say because the nerves can make you go blank, or if you start tripping up over your words and can't string a sentence together you can just give the GP the piece of paper.

    You can start with something along the lines of "I would like to talk about my mental health. I'm [age], can you go over the doctor-patient confidentiality for me please?" And when they do you can say "For the past [timeframe] I've been experiencing these symptoms [etc.]" or "I've been feeling [symptoms] and I think it may be caused by [6th form, stress, etc.]". Remember the GP can't read your mind so you have to make it clear what your symptoms are and what you're worried about.

    An important thing is to be comfortable with the doctor you're talking to. Don't pick one that's always in a mood, gives you the 'I don't have time for this' kind of B.S. I think some GPs have certain doctors allocated to certain health issues so you can try asking the receptionist for their recommendation but I'm not sure, also the receptionist doesn't need to know what your appointment is for if you don't want them to.

    Do be careful when mentioning suicidal thoughts - I'm not sure how secure your confidentiality is if you are under 18. I think it should be fine as long as you don't have a plan but make sure to ask the GP during the initial stages of your consultation.

    Good luck
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm just worried about bursting into tears and then be unable to explain myself very well and just give the GP the impression that I'm just over reacting since nothing significantly bad has happened in my life, compared to some people.
    This will definitely not happen, I can promise you that. It's unfortunate that a lot of people don't really understand what depression is and don't seem to realise that it's a mental health disorder that doesn't really have any dependence on whether or not anything "significantly bad has happened", but GPs are trained professionals and they absolutely know this. They will take you seriously.
    • #3
    #3

    [QUOTE=Anonymous;70049720]
    (Original post by Laughh3)

    It's just mainly one teacher. She stopped being so unfair to me for a while when my parents had a word with her, but she's started being horrible again. It creates a whole domino effect and so the other teachers started disliking me too last year, because of her , but not so much now.

    And yes I have quite a few friends surprisingly, but i don't even see the point of socialising any more, not really in the mood for it. I literally go to school, go home, attempt to revise but fail to, then sleep late.I go out with family sometimes, but don't really like going out with my friends and makeup excuses not to go.
    I can relate to you, believe me. College has been awful for me this year because of a really insensitive teacher and I dread every day I have to go to college. But I go to college to learn, that's it.

    Prove your teachers wrong and get the grades you need. You don't want to waste another year in Sixth form.

    Just act and don't think about how you feel, the past, future, etc. Don't think about exams but just think: 'I need to revise this (topic) today. I can do it and I will.'

    Force yourself to socilaise- you want to be happy but nobody can make you happy except for you

    Also, speak to your school counsellor maybe (if you have one)?
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    To me it sounds like stress because I felt like that throughout the whole of sixth forms and as soon as I finished my last A2 exam and went on summer holidays I felt much much better. BUT if you think it's more than that, and you're worried, do go to the GP.

    Start by making an appointment, some people feel better if they make it ASAP so they get it over and done with because waiting can make them anxious, others want the time to prepare and get their nerves together so when you want it depends on how you feel. I would make a list of your symptoms, just like you wrote in this thread. Write everything down in bullet points, just so when you go in you remember everything you want to say because the nerves can make you go blank, or if you start tripping up over your words and can't string a sentence together you can just give the GP the piece of paper.

    You can start with something along the lines of "I would like to talk about my mental health. I'm [age], can you go over the doctor-patient confidentiality for me please?" And when they do you can say "For the past [timeframe] I've been experiencing these symptoms [etc.]" or "I've been feeling [symptoms] and I think it may be caused by [6th form, stress, etc.]". Remember the GP can't read your mind so you have to make it clear what your symptoms are and what you're worried about.

    An important thing is to be comfortable with the doctor you're talking to. Don't pick one that's always in a mood, gives you the 'I don't have time for this' kind of B.S. I think some GPs have certain doctors allocated to certain health issues so you can try asking the receptionist for their recommendation but I'm not sure, also the receptionist doesn't need to know what your appointment is for if you don't want them to.

    Do be careful when mentioning suicidal thoughts - I'm not sure how secure your confidentiality is if you are under 18. I think it should be fine as long as you don't have a plan but make sure to ask the GP during the initial stages of your consultation.

    Good luck
    Yeah it might be stress because I also felt so much better when I was on holiday during summer. But I had random moments when I just broke down (about family issues, school , the usual and it was even worse the week before I had to go back to Sixth Form again. I guess I hate SF that much lol. I've Just turned 18. + thank you so much for the tips
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi,
    for the past two years I've always felt so down. Idk sixth form has caused it but i really do hate sixth form and the teachers. Especially since some of thing treat me like I'm stupid and pick on me. My parents know I had these 'low' moments but we've never really used to word 'depressed', I guess they're just trying to avoid mentioning it as a possibility as much as possible. But i'm feeling even worse now, especially with exams coming soon. I'm not sure if I'm depressed but I always feel so lonely, I'm so stressed, I eat so much and I hardly get any sleep, and I'm generally just so unhappy. I find myself crying at some nights, like right now as I'm typing this, but no one really knows how awful I feel. I tend to keep most of it myself because I'm sure people will just say the usual 'just stay positive' or 'stay strong' but I've tried so hard to change. I have no motivation for my exams and just life in general. I did really well for my GCSEs and got all A*s but for AS i've basically got U's . I've had thoughts of not wanting to live anymore but I know I'd never do that so I guess thats not that serious. I don't self harm. Maybe its just 'teen angst' , but I just know that I hate this feeling.

    TLDR: I just want to talk to a GP to see if I'm depressed, but I'm really awkward to talk about these things and I wouldn't know how to start the conversation and talk about this. Do I just say "I think I might be depressed?'. I also don't want to go with my parents, just on my own.
    Sounds like depression could be a possibility. It's worth you seeing a doctor to get some advice.

    Seeing a dr for mh is just like anything else you'd see a doctor about. You go in, say what's going on and have a bit of a chat and they'll do their doctor thing. Most likely result is them suggesting some therapy. If you are under 18 CAMHS is a possibility and I would suggest you try it. It's not all that different from adult therapy- they just know a bit more about school and teenage issues cos they deal with it more.

    MH issues can make the whole doctor thing more awkward, mostly cos it's such an emotional topic for you, so you may want to take a list of things you want to mention and any questions you want to ask. Mind.org has some advice on seeing a doctor about mh issues so you could check that out too.

    Some doctors like to do a wait and see thing before making any big decisions, so if you don't feel like much has happened just head back there and be a little more persistent about it. It also helps to not just say how you are feeling, but how it's affecting you. So like if you're getting more tired, does it mean you are late for college sometimes? Or is being stressed out meaning you can't sleep? Or are you avoiding social situations cos you feel like you can't cope with it? Stuff like that just helps put it into perspective a bit since they can't feel what you're feeling.

    Everybody has their own specific concerns so if you have any questions just let me know and I can try to answer. I first saw a dr for depression somewhere around your age so hopefully I have a bit of experience that can help you.

    Oh and it's worth talking to college too. They can help you out and make things in their court less of a burden for you.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    This will definitely not happen, I can promise you that. It's unfortunate that a lot of people don't really understand what depression is and don't seem to realise that it's a mental health disorder that doesn't really have any dependence on whether or not anything "significantly bad has happened", but GPs are trained professionals and they absolutely know this. They will take you seriously.
    Thanks I needed to hear that. I feel so ungrateful and guilty whenever I feel so down even though one of my friends is going through worse things and always has a smile on her face. Whenever I attempt to open up to my parents or anyone else they just say "you have to stay strong, cheer up" so Ive just stopped talking about how I feel to anyone and feel even worse whenever I can't just cheer myself up.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks I needed to hear that. I feel so ungrateful and guilty whenever I feel so down even though one of my friends is going through worse things and always has a smile on her face. Whenever I attempt to open up to my parents or anyone else they just say "you have to stay strong, cheer up" so Ive just stopped talking about how I feel to anyone and feel even worse whenever I can't just cheer myself up.
    I know it can be really difficult when people around you don't understand, but the important thing that you need to understand is that there is no reason to feel guilty because depression (a mental health condition) is not the same thing as "just being sad" (a response to things not going well). Speak to your GP and they will be able to advise you further
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    How I did it was I talked about how I felt (avoiding the words "depressed" or "depression" entirely), and then answered their subsequent questions, and let them come to a conclusion on the diagnosis.

    You can't be more awkward than I was. I started talking, stopped, and then asked, "Are you even- uh... is a GP even the right person to talk to about this?" :lol:
    • #1
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I know it can be really difficult when people around you don't understand, but the important thing that you need to understand is that there is no reason to feel guilty because depression (a mental health condition) is not the same thing as "just being sad" (a response to things not going well). Speak to your GP and they will be able to advise you further
    Say I do have depression...do I have to mention it in my Uni applications? I'd rather not let them know because I'm worried they may be prejudice towards me because of it even if they deny it
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi,
    for the past two years I've always felt so down. Idk sixth form has caused it but i really do hate sixth form and the teachers. Especially since some of thing treat me like I'm stupid and pick on me. My parents know I had these 'low' moments but we've never really used to word 'depressed', I guess they're just trying to avoid mentioning it as a possibility as much as possible. But i'm feeling even worse now, especially with exams coming soon. I'm not sure if I'm depressed but I always feel so lonely, I'm so stressed, I eat so much and I hardly get any sleep, and I'm generally just so unhappy. I find myself crying at some nights, like right now as I'm typing this, but no one really knows how awful I feel. I tend to keep most of it myself because I'm sure people will just say the usual 'just stay positive' or 'stay strong' but I've tried so hard to change. I have no motivation for my exams and just life in general. I did really well for my GCSEs and got all A*s but for AS i've basically got U's . I've had thoughts of not wanting to live anymore but I know I'd never do that so I guess thats not that serious. I don't self harm. Maybe its just 'teen angst' , but I just know that I hate this feeling.

    TLDR: I just want to talk to a GP to see if I'm depressed, but I'm really awkward to talk about these things and I wouldn't know how to start the conversation and talk about this. Do I just say "I think I might be depressed?'. I also don't want to go with my parents, just on my own.
    Go on your own.
    They will be used to seeing depressed people virtually every day.

    Tell them you are concerned and what you have told us in your post or just write it down. he may offer you tablets or a referral to see a talking therapist.

    List your symptoms
    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/youth-men...alth-help.aspx
    http://www.interactiontalks.com/teen...ion-checklist/
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    This is what GPs are trained to do. It's not just writing prescriptions.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Say I do have depression...do I have to mention it in my Uni applications? I'd rather not let them know because I'm worried they may be prejudice towards me because of it even if they deny it
    Unless you've got serious extenuating circumstances (i.e. you've been clinically diagnosed and a doctor has stated that your depression has seriously impacted your exam results) then you probably shouldn't mention it in the application itself (not because they'll be prejudiced against you but more because there are other things they will be more interested in), but it definitely is worth declaring to the university when you choose your offers so you can get the help you need.
 
 
 
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