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    I'm in Year 12.My subjects are History, Psychology and Art. I finally decided I don't want to spend my life doing arts rather , I want to pursue my childhood dream as a lawyer. Arts is my strength but I'm not happy and I no longer enjoy it. Now I had a talk with our head teacher about changing my subject to English Literature since Unis don't accept Art as one of their entry requirement and even if they do, my chance of getting in is really low.
    However, she said it's too late for me to catch up now because of the coursework they've done long time ago.
    So she recommended me to drop Art this year and take English Lit as a replacement this September 2017-problem is it's a two year course and I need atleast 3A levels. By that, it means I need to stay behind for another year to finish one A level subject + an EPQ . I'll be continuing my other 2 subject with my age group then on September with the new incoming Year 12(year younger than me)


    Do you think 3 years in Sixth Form worth it?

    Thank you for those who will answer my concern.
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    One year may seem like a lot at this stage, but what it comes down to is whether you'd rather spend an extra year now, or potentially spending your life thinking 'what if'.

    I don't come from a law background, but I study a different competitive course and so many of my coursemates either took a third year of sixth form or a gap year. It's very common and there's no shame in it At university the age differences between people are much bigger but it doesn't even matter. I only found out the other day that one of my friends at university is three years older than me!

    I'll be honest, still being in sixth form while a lot of your current friends are at university might get frustrating, but if you use the year productively (e.g. you might have time for a job since you'll only be doing English and your EPQ that year), you'll be able to start university better prepared.

    It's entirely your choice and these are all just my 2 cents, but it's it's one year of your life vs pursuing your childhood dreams. How much is that worth?
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    I know a lot of people who have repeated year 12 and made use of their 1st year to help them do well the next time.
    If you're sure this is what you'd like to do, ten an extra year now would help, I'm sure Remember that Law is a very competitive course, so don't take your decision lightly. Also, to have a Law-related career, you don't even need a Law degree! So weigh everything up


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    (Original post by KJH0309)
    I'm in Year 12.My subjects are History, Psychology and Art. I finally decided I don't want to spend my life doing arts rather , I want to pursue my childhood dream as a lawyer. Arts is my strength but I'm not happy and I no longer enjoy it. Now I had a talk with our head teacher about changing my subject to English Literature since Unis don't accept Art as one of their entry requirement and even if they do, my chance of getting in is really low.
    However, she said it's too late for me to catch up now because of the coursework they've done long time ago.
    So she recommended me to drop Art this year and take English Lit as a replacement this September 2017-problem is it's a two year course and I need atleast 3A levels. By that, it means I need to stay behind for another year to finish one A level subject + an EPQ . I'll be continuing my other 2 subject with my age group then on September with the new incoming Year 12(year younger than me)


    Do you think 3 years in Sixth Form worth it?

    Thank you for those who will answer my concern.
    If you benefit from it in anyway whatsoever, then yes its worth it. It aint that bad to be fair, I did an extra year as I changed A-level subjects completely, plus if needed you could also retake other A-level subjects to get the best possible grades.
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    Universities may stipulate that your A levels have been taken at the same sitting, so check the details for the courses in which you are interested. For example, for LLB (M100) at UCL, your current A level subjects would be okay and so would History, Psychology and English Literature - but the grades (A*AA) must have been obtained at the same sitting.
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    If you benefit from it in anyway whatsoever, then yes its worth it. It aint that bad to be fair, I did an extra year as I changed A-level subjects completely, plus if needed you could also retake other A-level subjects to get the best possible grades.
    Hi are you in uni now? Was it hard for you to get a place in unis that you applied for? According to my teacher, unis-specifically Russell group members prefer students who only spent 2 years at sixth form and the rest who took an extra year were looked down upon. Is that true?
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    (Original post by KJH0309)
    Hi are you in uni now? Was it hard for you to get a place in unis that you applied for? According to my teacher, unis-specifically Russell group members prefer students who only spent 2 years at sixth form and the rest who took an extra year were looked down upon. Is that true?
    No that is not true whatsoever. The unis that look unfavourably for some courses tend to be Oxbridge, Imperial ,LSE and UCL. Try going on the unis you're interested website and checking their entry requirements. If it does not mention that you need to complete A-levels in 2yrs, then there's no disadvantage from applying there.

    There were so many people in my sixth form who took a third year for certain circumstances (as well as at my current uni), and still got all offers (they all applied to Sheffield, Nottingham, Birmingham, Southampton, Durham as well as others ). They really don't care, provided you meet the entry criteria (as in the right predicted grade, good enough AS/GCSE grades or equivalent), have a well written personal statement to leave an impression.
 
 
 
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