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    I watched lots of how to learn japanese videos, I bought the book japanese for busy people,I bought rosetta stone,I bought a book with lots of pictures and japanese words, I used memrise to learn Hiragana,I used an app on the app store to learn japanese. And still my japanese is non existent, I dont know any basics, except my name is, whats your name,hello and bye and some random words like colours,parts of your body,animals and how to count to 10. I been trying to learn japanese for over a year and it seems to not be happening, a lot of the resources i seen teach you random words or just random phrases, I would like to learn Japanese, to be able to use it, if i go there and to have the possibility to function if I wanted to live there and be able to communicate and have some basic reading skills.I tried rosetta stone, but its completely rubbish all it is, is some pictures and some voice saying something and you have to select a picture and i have no idea what the translation is of the words the person says, i tried it many times and its just complete rubbish, i really regret buying it.I tried a lot of free resources online and i dont seem to be getting anywhere.I heard of things like Italki , but i dont know any basics at all so even if i lets say called someone using these websites I wouldnt be able to say a thing to them, or practice any japanese as I dont really know any japanese at all.I looked at youtube as well.I think I would benefit from going to a language school,but it could be quite expensive and im not sure which ones are good.Any tips guys?Please be nice.
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    What exactly are you struggling with? Is it that you can't take in the things you are trying to learn?

    Also keep in mind that using bad resources can make learning a language harder. You can't learn a language from a dictionary for example, because even if you pick up a lot of random words, you will still be unable to correctly form sentences out of them since Japanese works completely differently to English. You'd need good textbooks that show and explain how to correctly form sentences, or language school.
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    (Original post by Nadile)
    What exactly are you struggling with? Is it that you can't take in the things you are trying to learn?

    Also keep in mind that using bad resources can make learning a language harder. You can't learn a language from a dictionary for example, because even if you pick up a lot of random words, you will still be unable to correctly form sentences out of them since Japanese works completely differently to English. You'd need good textbooks that show and explain how to correctly form sentences, or language school.
    I struggle a bit with remembering the words as the word have a lot of syllables and are quite long and the resources, I dont find them useful and i am not making any progress at all, i dont like textbooks i find them hard to follow and i have no idea how to use them.I looked into a language school, but i didnt see that many and im not sure if they are any good and most of them seem to be targeted at grown up adults and not teenagers who still go to school.
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    Fundamentally, If you have not utilised it already, AnkiWeb/Anki Flashcards (AnkiDroid on Android) is an SRS flashcard system; it would likely be beneficial to you if you are having difficulty in remembering words with many syllables. You can create your own personalised decks; images, audio clips and text can be used in the flashcards. You identify how confident you are at remembering the phrase/sentence, by using the colour system; ie red, yellow, green and the flashcard is reviewed accordingly - until you are able to recall the phrases/sentences with ease. Furthermore, to ensure that the information remains in your long term memory, it is best to review everyday - gradually distancing the periods in which you review the content, a function that Anki Flashcards have.

    Alternatively, I find that Microsoft OneNote is good for selecting bulk pieces of information on languages (in my case, Japanese and Swedish), and annotating it with annotations; enabling me to read and retain the information as I analyse it.

    Furthermore, I have found that the 'Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com' videos on YouTube, are beneficial; you can also take notes as you proceed through the videos - possibly transferring learnt phrases onto the Anki Flashcards, if you choose to do so.

    Additionally, there is a Microsoft IME keyboard tool you can utilise - enabling you to type Japanese via typing in Romaji and depending on the mode you have selected, will depend on whether this Romaji transforms into Hiragana, Katakana or Kanji. Hence, you might find this link useful:

    https://coscom.co.jp/learnjapanese801/index.html

    These are the computer/device based means of studying Japanese, that I recommend; however, if you are also interested in recommendations for excellent textbooks, I can inform you of those too.

    Good luck, with regards to your studies!

    :nyan:
 
 
 
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