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Don't want to do integrated masters any more. Watch

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    I'm in a bit of a dilemma.

    I signed up to an integrated masters in theoretical physics. At the time it was the obvious choice - my grades were good enough to get onto it, so why not..? More of an ego thing, I suspect.

    I'm now approaching the end of the degree (3rd year - final semester) and my heart just isn't in it any more. My course has been great and I still enjoy physics, but I don't want to do it for another year, and specially have no interest in research or an academic career so masters seems like a waste. For this reason, I don't think my heart will be in it, and as such as I'd likely fail anyway or get a very sub-par result.

    The problem lies in that I've left it quite late making this decision. In 1st and 2nd year it's easy to flip between BSc and integrated masters and vice-versa, but in 3rd year it's more difficult to do so.

    I understand that a student won't even be allowed to progress onto the masters if they don't reach a certain requirement, e.g. 100 credits with an average of 60% or whatever. In the case of not meeting the requirements, I presume they're awarded a standard degree and that's that?

    But what about a person like me whose grades are fine enough but simply doesn't want to do the masters any more? My concern is over the fact that I haven't done any kind of dissertation or final year project (because this is saved for 4th year for integrated masters students). It seems to be a requirement for most degrees at some point.

    I suppose this will be a problem, but again I refer to the students who don't even make the grade and aren't allowed to progress anyway - they too would not have done a research project but must be awarded something when they leave.

    Does anyone have any experience of this?

    I know I should just contact uni directly, but I fear the turmoil it may create so I'm putting it to this forum first, maybe to get some anecdotal advice or general opinions.

    Thanks.
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    Small contribution to my own thread:

    I've just been having a look at this - https://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/..._for_award.pdf - on page 5 we have:

    10.3 - To be eligible for the Bachelor’s degree with Classified Honours candidates are required to
    pass the module/s designated as comprising the Final Year Project of the programme of study on which they are registered.
    So does this mean I would likely be granted a degree, but without Honours?

    It seems a bit unfair, given that some university honours courses don't require a dissertation at all.

    If I were to be granted a 2:1 without honours, how might this affect me? Do employers even notice or care? Personally if I see Bsc or Bsc(Hons) or whatever, I would never have really thought about the big difference, other than one candidate wanted a more fancy-looking but arbitrary title on their CV.

    What I'm confused about now is that most information seems to say that non-honours degrees are basically a 'pass', and can't be rated any higher because the logic is that the candidate must have failed their project, hence not doing enough credits anyway. But in my case I'll have done quite enough credits to warrant a full degree, just without a final year project. I don't really know how I'd be classified.
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    (Original post by Pessimisterious)
    Small contribution to my own thread:

    I've just been having a look at this - https://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/..._for_award.pdf - on page 5 we have:



    So does this mean I would likely be granted a degree, but without Honours?

    It seems a bit unfair, given that some university honours courses don't require a dissertation at all.

    If I were to be granted a 2:1 without honours, how might this affect me? Do employers even notice or care? Personally if I see Bsc or Bsc(Hons) or whatever, I would never have really thought about the big difference, other than one candidate wanted a more fancy-looking but arbitrary title on their CV.

    What I'm confused about now is that most information seems to say that non-honours degrees are basically a 'pass', and can't be rated any higher because the logic is that the candidate must have failed their project, hence not doing enough credits anyway. But in my case I'll have done quite enough credits to warrant a full degree, just without a final year project. I don't really know how I'd be classified.
    You really need to talk to your university about this, each university has its own procedure in place- you won't be the first to drop down from the Intergrated Maters to the BSc late in the day.
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    (Original post by Pessimisterious)
    Small contribution to my own thread:

    I've just been having a look at this - https://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/..._for_award.pdf - on page 5 we have:



    So does this mean I would likely be granted a degree, but without Honours?

    It seems a bit unfair, given that some university honours courses don't require a dissertation at all.

    If I were to be granted a 2:1 without honours, how might this affect me? Do employers even notice or care? Personally if I see Bsc or Bsc(Hons) or whatever, I would never have really thought about the big difference, other than one candidate wanted a more fancy-looking but arbitrary title on their CV.

    What I'm confused about now is that most information seems to say that non-honours degrees are basically a 'pass', and can't be rated any higher because the logic is that the candidate must have failed their project, hence not doing enough credits anyway. But in my case I'll have done quite enough credits to warrant a full degree, just without a final year project. I don't really know how I'd be classified.
    If you graduate without honours then I don't think you will recieve a 2:1, which is, of course, upper second class honours. I would definitely discuss this with your university. On my integrated masters (MEng), there was still an individual project to do on the BEng year, meaning if you opted to finish before the full MEng then you would graduate with a BEng honours, as you had completed the dissertation. It would be quite odd and unfair, in my opinion, for there not to be a fall-back option for those doing the integrated masters.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    You really need to talk to your university about this, each university has its own procedure in place- you won't be the first to drop down from the Intergrated Maters to the BSc late in the day.
    Yeah, I think you may be right.

    Further research leads me to believe I'd be awarded a 2:1 Bsc , just with no 'Hons' suffix, which isn't all bad.

    I'll get in touch with course admin people soon.

    Cheers.
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    Just saying, having Hons adds more value to your CV. Same can be said for masters. Doing masters doesn't automatically mean you have to enter the academic field after you finish.
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    (Original post by agrew)
    Just saying, having Hons adds more value to your CV. Same can be said for masters. Doing masters doesn't automatically mean you have to enter the academic field after you finish.
    Well yes, having Hons would add more weight. Though I would question just how much weight. Personally, up until now I never thought much of it - I would only ever have considered differences between 1st, 2:1, 2:2 etc.

    I've now been quite intensely googling things like, "2:1 degree without honours", and it doesn't seem to be as huge an issue as I think. One article, about CV writing, suggested writing more detailed info about one's degree, possibly mentioning things like credits achieved or specific/relevant modules, exam averages etc. I think this would be a good way of easily getting around the meagre lack of the word 'Hons' on the page.

    About masters - I thought the majority had a fairly important research focus? The alternative is a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), which is basically the taught aspects of a masters degree without doing the research project at the end. This is something I'm thinking of doing, just not directly related to physics, and not right away - hence the desire to break away from the integrated masters I'm on now.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    If you graduate without honours then I don't think you will recieve a 2:1, which is, of course, upper second class honours. I would definitely discuss this with your university. On my integrated masters (MEng), there was still an individual project to do on the BEng year, meaning if you opted to finish before the full MEng then you would graduate with a BEng honours, as you had completed the dissertation. It would be quite odd and unfair, in my opinion, for there not to be a fall-back option for those doing the integrated masters.
    Yeah I agree, it would be unfair to be lumped with a poor-looking degree even after completing easily enough credits for what would more generally be classed as a 2:1 Hons degree. Problem is, my uni seems to say specifically that some sort of research/dissertation aspect needs to be passed to be allowed the 'Honours' label.

    There seems to be some conflicting info in places but I'm under the impression my degree would look something like "BSc Theoretical Physics, 2:1, Leeds University", which really isn't all that bad in my opinion. How many people would even make a point to ask where the 'honours' bit went, ha.

    Still, I'll get in touch with my uni to figure all this out for certain.

    Cheers for the input.
 
 
 
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