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Why the quality of NHS care is so poor? Watch

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    (Original post by AishaGirl)
    Criticising a service which quite frankly is absolutely amazing, simply because you might have to wait every so often or not get the exact service you were hoping for is just selfish.

    When you weigh up the cost of healthcare vs the tiny amount of money that comes from your pocket and paid into the system, you are getting an absolute bargain!

    The only thing I would say is they should cut some money from defence spending and put it into healthcare but I still stand by my statement and that is the NHS is fantastic, so you have to wait a little or you get a little bit of inconvenience, big woop.
    NHS spending per capita is £2,000 a year. That takes into account the whole population. Minus those unemployed, over aged, under aged, economically inactive.. the employment to population ratio is 70:30 so it'd be more than that on average.

    I'm not against the NHS and i think its great so yes i agree its money well spent but the quality is dimishing. I have no issue waiting in A&E (if I'm not in immediate danger) but it does let people down... You're right though, it is fantastic in many areas
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I am very sorry to hear that. I strongly agree with your point that simple check ups should be done without hesitation as they could safe lives and money.Not waiting until things became very serious.Maybe perhaps my case is not that serious but it is still pretty scary I must say and i think the NHS should provide more preventive measures for things which can lead to serious illnesses.
    How do you do this with everyone??
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    NHS spending per capita is £2,000 a year. That takes into account the whole population. Minus those unemployed, over aged, under aged, economically inactive.. the employment to population ratio is 70:30 so it'd be more than that on average.

    I'm not against the NHS and i think its great so yes i agree its money well spent but the quality is dimishing. I have no issue waiting in A&E (if I'm not in immediate danger) but it does let people down... You're right though, it is fantastic in many areas
    Sadly, there is still a regional divide. The South undoubtedly have better Trusts than the North.
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    There's not enough facts here to say for definite but this doesn't sound negligent at all to me (in the legal sense). You need to remember that doctors don't want to be sued for negligence, if the doctors didn't think your aunt needed a blood test for a bloated stomach then there will be a reason why and if part of that reason is that other responsible GPs also would not have sent your aunt for bloods based on her symptoms and what she has described to them then there wouldn't be a successful claim in negligence. I also don't think one person being misdiagnosed would justify a statement like 'the NHS is failing', I can see why you'd think that when it's your relatives and obviously emotive (although I have also had family members misdiagnosed and seriously ill because of it) but I don't think that's the natural conclusion based on one person either
    There were no tests at all! She even said to her doctor she thinks its cancer, she had many of the symptoms for cancer to be a suspect... she went to a solicitor regarding the issue who said she had a good case but didn't go forward with it since she didn't want money from them, she also received several apologies from NHS management and the GP's office was taken under new management. I guess its wrong to accuse the whole system of failure (that's not what i intended but clearly that's how its come out) but this isn't a rare story, on top of that the delay for treatment was ridiculous.. she was put in a situation of go private (luckily she had the option) or die... unless something is done soon, even more cases where there is misdiagnosis or too long of a waiting list for vital treatment will occur sadly
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    (Original post by AishaGirl)
    Go private if you don't like it.

    The NHS is one of the best things about the UK.
    Well that's not really a very helpful comment is it? Most people can't afford to go private. Seeing as there's no option to 'opt out' of paying for the NHS (funded through general taxation) it makes sense that the public should have some say and be able to give their own opinion about whether the quality of the service is really meeting their needs.

    Simply saying the NHS is 'the best thing' does nothing for people who have to wait endless amounts of time to gain a single GP appointment etc.
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    Lmao "underfunding"
    It lacks efficiency.
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    (Original post by Percypig17)
    Well that's not really a very helpful comment is it? Most people can't afford to go private. Seeing as there's no option to 'opt out' of paying for the NHS (funded through general taxation) it makes sense that the public should have some say and be able to give their own opinion about whether the quality of the service is really meeting their needs.

    Simply saying the NHS is 'the best thing' does nothing for people who have to wait endless amounts of time to gain a single GP appointment etc.
    "endless amounts of time"... I think you're exaggerating a little bit. The NHS was never meant to be first class health care, it is there for the millions of people who cannot afford the best healthcare money can buy.

    I agree it's not nice to have to book appointments and wait but if you want instant privatised style healthcare then be prepared to pay a lot more tax, something I have a feeling most of you would not want.
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    There were no tests at all! She even said to her doctor she thinks its cancer, she had many of the symptoms for cancer to be a suspect... she went to a solicitor regarding the issue who said she had a good case but didn't go forward with it since she didn't want money from them, she also received several apologies from NHS management and the GP's office was taken under new management. I guess its wrong to accuse the whole system of failure (that's not what i intended but clearly that's how its come out) but this isn't a rare story, on top of that the delay for treatment was ridiculous.. she was put in a situation of go private (luckily she had the option) or die... unless something is done soon, even more cases where there is misdiagnosis or too long of a waiting list for vital treatment will occur sadly
    I'm sorry this happened to your aunt. But do you have any idea how many patients worry that they have cancer when they don't? Or how many 'cancer symptoms' are both non-specific to cancer and extremely nebulous anyway? How would you solve the problem of trying to test all of those people for a disease they're not likely to have (and I'm assuming you're aware how expensive even 'simple blood tests' are)?

    If every single person who was worried about their symptoms was tested for every eventuality without taking into account the likelihood of the risk, costs would be through the roof. Do you appreciate that there simply isn't the money to do what you're suggesting should be done? Unless we're willing to pour literally billions more into the NHS, we need to rationalise tests and services according to statistical likelihoods, as we currently do.

    Your previous comment about how your aunt's private doctors 'took some tests and the results came back the next week saying its cancer and has been in her body for a year' doesn't sound quite right. There's no test that I can think of that would definitively tell you anything so specific. With a combination of staging scans and biopsies you might be able to make a good guess at how long a cancer has been present, but it isn't as straightforward as retrospectively saying 'it's been there a year' or 'it's been there a few months', I'm afraid.
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    (Original post by mervin101)
    Lmao "underfunding"
    It lacks efficiency.
    'Lmao' - those things aren't mutually exclusive.
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    Take away from the Foreign Aid so we aren't paying more than Spain and Italy combined, and give the money to the NHS. Get rid of Trident and get more contracts from foreign countries to build their stuff, like we are building Turkeys jets. The country has potential to be brilliant, but we spend it on stupid things that we can't afford.
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    Who knows...You van get private treatment!
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    I'm sorry this happened to your aunt. But do you have any idea how many patients worry that they have cancer when they don't? Or how many 'cancer symptoms' are both non-specific to cancer and extremely nebulous anyway? How would you solve the problem of trying to test all of those people for a disease they're not likely to have (and I'm assuming you're aware how expensive even 'simple blood tests' are)?

    If every single person who was worried about their symptoms was tested for every eventuality without taking into account the likelihood of the risk, costs would be through the roof. Do you appreciate that there simply isn't the money to do what you're suggesting should be done? Unless we're willing to pour literally billions more into the NHS, we need to rationalise tests and services according to statistical likelihoods, as we currently do.

    Your previous comment about how your aunt's private doctors 'took some tests and the results came back the next week saying its cancer and has been in her body for a year' doesn't sound quite right. There's no test that I can think of that would definitively tell you anything so specific. With a combination of staging scans and biopsies you might be able to make a good guess at how long a cancer has been present, but it isn't as straightforward as retrospectively saying 'it's been there a year' or 'it's been there a few months', I'm afraid.
    I know but the problems persisted and the doctor had many reasons to suspect cancer the main one being it only got worse. I would put there name on a list, if symptoms got worse and they followed the initial advice I'd make the call. I appreciate it but look, the doctor said it was one thing, she took advice and it got worse, the doctor didn't push for tests despite their being cancer symptoms which progressed, when you draw the line of suspecting cancer? Is a lump not enough? Is pain the area not enough? Having many symptoms for cancer of that area which keep getting worse? How would you diagnose cancer then?

    I'm guessing the tests went in hand with evidence about how long she's been having these issues, the size of it, etc. This information didn't come with the news of cancer but came around the time or maybe after the consultation for her operation, sorry if I wasn't clear about that.
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    #2

    With all the people sharing bad experiences I thought i'd share one of my experiences with the nhs...

    I had a tonsillectomy a while back. I went private cos I have access to it and waiting around on the nhs isn't pleasant.
    The day before that I had realise that I didn't have enough of my medication for my recovery period and wouldn't be able to go get more while I was still recovering. I went to a pharmacy (not my usual one because I was staying with bf). They had no record of my prescriptions (duh) and I didn't have any so they called my surgery for me. I got it all sorted and had my meds by the end of the day.

    Anyway, after the surgery I went off to recover at bf's house. Things were going okay until about a week in when I started bleeding a little. I called the hospital I had it done at and they said a bit of bleeding is fine and use some of this mouthwash to protect against nasties and improve the grim taste a little.
    Bleeding got worse the next day. I'm pretty sure I called the hospital again and they told me it was a matter for the nhs.

    Side note: private doesn't do urgent stuff. In fact, if there is an emergency while you are in surgery with them they call an ambulance and send you to the NHS so they can help you.

    Called 111, told to go to A&E. Went to A&E, waited around 4 hours, told it was sufficiently little blood it wasn't a concern. Told to come back if it gets worse.
    Flash forward to next night, blood again. Seems like more this time so call 111 to be safe. Get to my date of birth and I'm bleeding too much to talk. Hand phone to bf, but now I can't breathe. I'm freaking out and feel like i'm going to drown in my own blood. They tell him to call 999. Ambulance on the way.
    Bleeding calms down a bit and eventually stops before they get there. They do some tests and look at the amount of blood. Tell me they can take me to A&E in ambo or I can be driven by somebody. I don't want them to have to wait around with me while they have other stuff to be doing so I get a lift. They sign me off to bf's dad and I head to A&E.
    Told ent isn't on until 6am so I can't see them. Wait around for hours again. Ask if i'm going to be called soon and told there are emergencies coming in on the other side. I meet one of these emergencies later. Guy beaten half to death outside a mate's flat for no reason. He wanders through the doors looking like utter (bleep) and asks if it's am or pm. He doesn't know if he's been in there 2 hours or 12.
    Seen not long after and get the same comment. Not enough blood. Come back if there's more.

    Next day I head home. I feel bad for having my bf's parents take me to A&E so much. It starts up again in the car. Not falling for it this time. I'm not going and wasting hours in A&E to be told to go home and come back when it's worse. I'm going home and getting some sleep.
    It calms down and I does off in the car. Wake up and there's a tiny bit more, but whatever. Get home and sit down. Within 2 minuets it's started again but this time it's different. It tastes almost acidic and it's darker. Is it coming from further down?
    Looks like it's time for A&E again. Just going to be told to go home, but i'm scared so I go anyway.

    Book in, face in cup still bleeding, but only a little. Bf does all the talking. Sit down for a couple of minuets and get called for triage. Quicker that usual, guess it's not a busy night. Bleeding has pretty much stopped now. Tell them about the bleeding and other A&E trips. Tell them about this time being a little different. They do a prick test and blood pressure and i'm ready to be sent back for my 4 hour wait. "Okay come through." Huh?
    Shown to a little paper curtain cubicle in ICU and they leave me for a moment. Soon I feel it starting again and I get bf to call a nurse over.

    And that's when it all started. I was violently vomiting blood for god knows how long- maybe an hour. They stuck a couple of needles in me and gave me something that eventually stopped the bleeding. I stayed in ICU for a couple of hours. Poor bf had to hold my iv while I pissed. After a wile with no more bleeding I was sent to a ward- whatever one had space- and kept in for about 2 days. They let my bf stay with me for the rest of the night and some lovely nurses helped make me feel reassured.

    At times it was difficult getting hold of a doctor to sign things off (like letting me take my usual meds and doing my discharge), but the nurses handled everything and listened to my every concern. Sure it wasn't a streamline experience, but they practically saved my life and that's worth all the waiting i've ever had to do.

    The nhs may be strained and have a few issues, but it saves lives every damn day. The people who work there put up with poor treatment so they can help kids with the sniffles and old ladies with creaky joints. It may not be the best it could be, but that's cos people don't treat it how they should and don't put into it what they expect to get out. It saves lives for free and i'm damn proud of it.
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    (Original post by sabertooth)
    nice to see how low you set the bar.
    hahahahahhaa
    • #3
    #3

    Lmao you're complaining about having to wait a few months try 7 years of your GP telling you that you'll 'grow out of' your chronic illness.
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    Just be glad you don't live in the US and many other countries and have to pay money for your treatment, because in many other countries healthcare is expensive. Having free healthcare is one of the best things about the UK.
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    Have you gone back to your GP to get any more tests / a referral?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Have you gone back to your GP to get any more tests / a referral?
    The nearest appointment is in 5 days time that is unbelievably long.Considering the fact that some people go to their GP for none sense e.g. Tooth ache or a cold.
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    The tories are running it into the ground.

    RIP NHS
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    (Original post by JustPadz)
    Just be glad you don't live in the US and many other countries and have to pay money for your treatment, because in many other countries healthcare is expensive. Having free healthcare is one of the best things about the UK.
    I bet the tax then would have been so much lower thus private health care would be way more affordable as they would have to compete with each other.So perhaps it would have been better that way.
 
 
 
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