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    I've been reading many different things regarding this topic: some say that some schools will hire you without QTS, but the pay is a bit lower and you are expected to obtain QTS within a few years. Others say you absolutely MUST have QTS in order to work as a teacher.

    I'm going to be studying BSc Maths and Statistics at uni in the UK, and am interested in possibly teaching maths in a secondary school after graduation. I am an international student from the USA. I've been doing some research and apparently, there are a severe shortage of maths and science secondary school teachers, so they are more willing to accommodate a work visa for someone working in this sector.

    Anyone have any advice for me in regards to this situation?
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    Technically private schools *can* hire those without QTS (or the equivalent thereof). But this does not mean that they will choose to do so. Even if they hired a teacher who did not have QTS, it would not surprise me if they strongly advised/required you to acquire it within a few years of working for them.

    There are many bursaries/"golden hellos" available to those wanting to become teachers in shortage subjects, so it makes sense to take up this opportunity as it would still be financially advantageous to you to do the PGCE.

    Speaking as someone who has worked as an unqualified teacher before obtaining QTS, I would still advise you to get QTS (whether by the PGCE or another route) as you learn so much about yourself and about education by doing it. Even if you are naturally very strong in your subject and/or have excellent aptitude for teaching, there is absolutely no way that you cannot gain from *not* achieving QTS - so I would be interested to know why you are apparently so resistant to the possibility.
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    Echoing what was already said, you need QTS to teach in state schools, it isn't required for private schools but you will probably find it much harder to get a job without it.

    There is indeed a massive shortage of Maths teachers, so take up the golden handshake if you can!
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Technically private schools *can* hire those without QTS (or the equivalent thereof). But this does not mean that they will choose to do so. Even if they hired a teacher who did not have QTS, it would not surprise me if they strongly advised/required you to acquire it within a few years of working for them.

    There are many bursaries/"golden hellos" available to those wanting to become teachers in shortage subjects, so it makes sense to take up this opportunity as it would still be financially advantageous to you to do the PGCE.

    Speaking as someone who has worked as an unqualified teacher before obtaining QTS, I would still advise you to get QTS (whether by the PGCE or another route) as you learn so much about yourself and about education by doing it. Even if you are naturally very strong in your subject and/or have excellent aptitude for teaching, there is absolutely no way that you cannot gain from *not* achieving QTS - so I would be interested to know why you are apparently so resistant to the possibility.
    I wouldn't be against achieving QTS after a few years of working in the field or through paid work experience. My challenge is, through all the research I've done thus far, I am not eligible for the grand majority of the bursaries available as I am not a UK resident. I will already be in quite a bit of debt from my degree (~$90,000), so it would not be financially feasible for me to have to pay more fees right after my first degree. I was hoping to be able to work for a bit, gaining experience during my employment, and obtain QTS after I've paid down some of my loan fees (if I must return to get a PGCE), or through the work experience. US student loans are far different than UK student loans, unfortunately, as you must make payments regardless of your employment status, income, etc.
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    (Original post by toridor324_)
    I wouldn't be against achieving QTS after a few years of working in the field or through paid work experience. My challenge is, through all the research I've done thus far, I am not eligible for the grand majority of the bursaries available as I am not a UK resident. I will already be in quite a bit of debt from my degree (~$90,000), so it would not be financially feasible for me to have to pay more fees right after my first degree. I was hoping to be able to work for a bit, gaining experience during my employment, and obtain QTS after I've paid down some of my loan fees (if I must return to get a PGCE), or through the work experience. US student loans are far different than UK student loans, unfortunately, as you must make payments regardless of your employment status, income, etc.
    Understandable, and a shame, though I guess understandable (they don't want to pour money into someone who may train and then leave!). I'd be tempted to say get as much child-experience as you can during your degree (the STEM Ambassador programme may be able to help hook you up with volunteering experiences) and start making links early on with independent schools. The better a relationship you have with one, the better your chance is that they will take you on without the QTS.

    Sadly, you won't be able to teach in a state school without the QTS -
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/qualifie...her-status-qts
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    You can teach in Further Education colleges without QTS. All you need is a good quality Honours degree and a PGCE [FE], or a PGDE [FE]. [This is Northern Ireland and it may be different in England].
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    Oh, just a thought and I have no idea what entry requirements etc are, but could be worth checking out Teach First and School Direct, other routes into teaching
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    (Original post by Sarah_Brighton)
    Understandable, and a shame, though I guess understandable (they don't want to pour money into someone who may train and then leave!). I'd be tempted to say get as much child-experience as you can during your degree (the STEM Ambassador programme may be able to help hook you up with volunteering experiences) and start making links early on with independent schools. The better a relationship you have with one, the better your chance is that they will take you on without the QTS.

    Sadly, you won't be able to teach in a state school without the QTS -
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/qualifie...her-status-qts
    (Original post by Sarah_Brighton)
    Oh, just a thought and I have no idea what entry requirements etc are, but could be worth checking out Teach First and School Direct, other routes into teaching
    Thank you so much for this advice; I'll be sure to look into Teach First and School Direct as well as the STEM Ambassador programme! Hopefully between these opportunities and my degree, I will be able to find a paid position after graduation!
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    Would definitely urge you to look towards School Direct etc in this case then.

    Alternatively, you could always work in an international school first (as they can be more amenable to taking non-qualified teachers) for 2 years minimum before pursuing the Assessment Only route.
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    I am currently teaching mathematics part time at a college without QTS
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    (Original post by toridor324_)
    I've been reading many different things regarding this topic: some say that some schools will hire you without QTS, but the pay is a bit lower and you are expected to obtain QTS within a few years. Others say you absolutely MUST have QTS in order to work as a teacher.

    I'm going to be studying BSc Maths and Statistics at uni in the UK, and am interested in possibly teaching maths in a secondary school after graduation. I am an international student from the USA. I've been doing some research and apparently, there are a severe shortage of maths and science secondary school teachers, so they are more willing to accommodate a work visa for someone working in this sector.

    Anyone have any advice for me in regards to this situation?
    You can work in the following institutions without QTS

    Acadamies (Many Secondaty Schools are these in the UK)
    Further Education Colleges
    Training Providers
    Private Schools
    Independent Schools
    Community Centres
    Prisons

    Of course it is preferable to have QTS but it is not really a necessity for these types education providers. Most require you to have a PGCE/DTTLS or Cert Ed to get paid as a qualified teacher. Alternatively you can work unqualified but you will be paid the unqualified teacher rate.
 
 
 
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