Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Make renting cheaper for everyone - Government Petition Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Good day all, I'm looking for some support from fellow students in relation to renting costs. I really believe we can help make some changes if we raise it with the government and give them awareness of what's going on.

    Young professionals are being forced out of Cities such as Oxford, Cambridge and many other large fantastic cities to move back in with their parents or leave their jobs in search of somewhere less expensive. Young professionals, couples especially student couples are seriously financially suffering from having to pay huge sums of money to live together.

    In 2012 this happened in Oxford: http://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/.../9840489.Couple_forced.../...

    It's now 2016 and many many more people have been affected around the UK.

    We want the government to help regulate the local councils and stop them for forcing unreasonable fees such as the HMO license on to landlords with small properties which then get passed on to the renter.

    Read the legislation below yourself, and think, does it really make sense? Just three people? TWO or more households?

    An HMO license is necessary if:
    It is occupied by three (3) or more people: Adults and children are counted as people

    They form two (2) or more households: A household may be; either a single person, or several members of the same family all related by blood (up to first cousin distance), or marriage (or equivalent co-habiting arrangement).”

    Many councils have implemented regulations that prevent more than THREE people residing in a dwelling. Even if TWO of those are a renting couple.

    Everyone is well aware of the difficulties for couples and small groups to find accommodation. Current rent prices are simply not affordable without having a third person renting or being a large group.

    Councils brought the HMO in; to increase living standards, although this may have helped in larger dwellings, this has had a huge negative impact in the smaller dwellings which were already quite suitable for three people.

    Landlords of small dwellings have to pay excessive fees for inspections and HMO certification and force them to increase the number of people in their dwelling to gain monetary return.

    HMOs may have indeed increased the number of available rooms for rent, it is equally removing the amount of available properties for young professionals. Our government should be aware and improve these HMO regulations to ensure more availability.

    We need a change, and I strongly believe this will help stabalise housing and help hundreds of individuals who are a value to our cities.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cs1001)
    Councils brought the HMO in; to increase living standards, although this may have helped in larger dwellings, this has had a huge negative impact in the smaller dwellings which were already quite suitable for three people.

    Landlords of small dwellings have to pay excessive fees for inspections and HMO certification and force them to increase the number of people in their dwelling to gain monetary return.
    I feel you're missing the wood from the trees with this issue.

    The driving force behind high rent costs at the moment is a lack of supply of cheap affordable housing, not the relatively small inspection/certification fees imposed on landlords.

    If you crunch the numbers a HMO license and inspection fees work out at around £25-35 per month per tenant - peanuts compared to the £100s landlords charge in the desirable areas you have mentioned. From a financial perspective it is ludicrous that landlords would decline paying £25-35/month/tenant in order to earn a further £400-600/month/tenant in rent.

    Even if you could abolish these fees do you really think landlords would pass on these "savings" to tenants?

    The real reason why some landlords refuse to apply for a HMO license is normally the fact that they are restricted from doing so (eg; criminal record, past breach of landlord law or code of conduct) or their property is unsafe or unsuitable (eg; unchecked/unsafe boilers/wiring/appliances, damp and poor ventilation, poor fire safety, poor living standards, etc) and the costs associated with bringing their properties up to standard.

    In my opinion it is a small price to pay compared to the costs and dangers of rogue landlords.

    If you want to do something that will genuinely benefit renters you would be better focusing on capping agency fees (similar to that in Scotland), limiting the amount landlords can increase rent by on a yearly basis or building more affordable housing.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I completely agree, it's about supply and demand.
    It does not bother us if the landlords pass the reduced costs on, because by allowing a third person in to a dwelling of a couple that third person could help towards the costs.

    There is very little difference between renting 1 bedroom and two bedroom flats:
    1 Bedroom:
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...etAgreed=false
    2 Bedroom:
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...latShare=false


    At the moment no landlords will HMO license their 2 bedroom property and I really don't think it's to do with the reasons you state, although understandable and logical, the licencing puts off many viable landlords. People with small apartments who just move out for a year or so don't want to make all the changes required and jump through hurdles and red tape.

    This simply makes couples finding a place to rent impossible.
    £1400 for a two bedroom flat a month between a couple is £700 each.
    With a third person that makes it an affordable £465 each.

    The current legislation prevents that third person.

    I do not think I'm missing any points here.
    If landlords are unwilling to HMO license the property, how will any couples find an affordable place to stay in counties that are restricting it too heavily.

    Obviously there should still be checks to any property renting, but what does it have to do with there being 2 or more households? A family of 5 can live in there without any complaints.

    It doesn't matter how much it costs if three people are allowed in a small dwelling.

    By removing the requirement of an HMO for 2 bedroom apartments, it would in fact increase the amount of available places to rent and therefore reduce demand. Demand is so high right now any small change would help significantly.

    If it was all about safety why would a live in landlord be allowed people from 2 different house holds before it becomes an HMO. It's absolute nonsense.

    My friends and I have all been to new builds which are 2 bedroom flats, they are wonderful condition, it's very rarely anything to do with the landlord.
    Around 30 properties we've visited and spoken to many many landlords, all who say that the licensing is too much hassle and they don't want to turn their house in to an HMO.

    The legislation should simply be changed to "More than 2 households".
    NOT 2 or more households.

    Some local authorities allow 3 households, and 3 people, but no more. So why is this the case? If it was a safety thing every one would be the same. Money is the reason behind it.

    The Vale of White horse in Oxfordshire are brilliant, they are lenient and allow masses of affordable places to stay.
    Oxford City council are the complete opposite, and are in my and many other's opinions damaging the economy.

    Moving on to building more "affordable housing". You should see what is classed as "Affordable housing in Oxford". It's a joke.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    limiting the amount landlords can increase rent by on a yearly basis
    Have to be careful with this, it could very well lead to a reduction in housing quality.
    At the end of the day, the landlord is running a business like anyone else and have to make ends meet. For example, as much as our local cafe wants to use higher quality ingredients, the money has to come from somewhere to buy them. They cannot raise the price of their meals else they risk losing competitiveness (There's only so much people would spend on breakfast).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
    How much money do you spend a week?The ultimate guide to tax!Guide to student bank accounts

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Quick link:

    Unanswered money and finance threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.