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    Hello,
    I have my first hospital work experience tomorrow.
    Has anyone got any advice on how to make the most out of it and what to expect?
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    expect a lot of standing around, listening, being forgotten.

    advice bring food- energy bars, cereal bars, fruit WATER. wear comfortable shoes. bring a small notepad to jot things down on
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    expect a lot of standing around, listening, being forgotten.

    advice bring food- energy bars, cereal bars, fruit WATER. wear comfortable shoes. bring a small notepad to jot things down on
    Thank you so much for the advice.
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    (Original post by tessa w)
    Hello,
    I have my first hospital work experience tomorrow.
    Has anyone got any advice on how to make the most out of it and what to expect?
    Don't feel bad when you're ignored, etc. Medical students go through that stuff all the time - don't let it make you feel like you're doing something wrong or make you nervous.

    Otherwise:

    - At the end of the day, write down interesting things that happened during the day. Mainly here I'm talking about things you can refer to in your personal statement and at interview. So difficult situations, what the doctor did, what the nurses did, etc. Ensure it's all anonymised (no names, ages, etc).

    - Ask questions if appropriate. These don't need to be clinical but more general medicine questions. Pick your time carefully though.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Don't feel bad when you're ignored, etc. Medical students go through that stuff all the time - don't let it make you feel like you're doing something wrong or make you nervous.

    Otherwise:

    - At the end of the day, write down interesting things that happened during the day. Mainly here I'm talking about things you can refer to in your personal statement and at interview. So difficult situations, what the doctor did, what the nurses did, etc. Ensure it's all anonymised (no names, ages, etc).

    - Ask questions if appropriate. These don't need to be clinical but more general medicine questions. Pick your time carefully though.
    Thank you so much for the advice.
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    All good advice so far. I would add:

    1. Introduce yourself to everyone and be even more polite than you would usually be in a formal setting.

    2. As Beska said, you might feel ignored at times but this feeling of awkwardness and being in the way is something medical students deal with as well.

    3. Think critically about everything you see - could that have been done better? Why did that happen? How is the patient likely to be feeling after that interaction? Etc. You will want to convey (albeit concisely) what you learned from each placement in your personal statement. One of these experiences might also turn out to be very helpful when it comes to interview ("What did you learn from you work experience?", "What do you think is difficult about being a doctor?", etc). Definitely write things down - thoughts/feelings/reflections as well as what actually happened.

    4. Wait for an appropriate moment but don't be afraid to ask questions. It can sometimes be awkward for staff to look after work experience students as they don't necessarily have much common ground (we can't easily "quiz" you on knowledge in the same way as medical students). Work experience students are often very nervous and clam up. Obviously you shouldn't aim to stop someone from doing their work but the occasional question will help you come across as keen, enthusiastic, and wanting to talk.

    Have fun!
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    All good advice so far. I would add:

    1. Introduce yourself to everyone and be even more polite than you would usually be in a formal setting.

    2. As Beska said, you might feel ignored at times but this feeling of awkwardness and being in the way is something medical students deal with as well.

    3. Think critically about everything you see - could that have been done better? Why did that happen? How is the patient likely to be feeling after that interaction? Etc. You will want to convey (albeit concisely) what you learned from each placement in your personal statement. One of these experiences might also turn out to be very helpful when it comes to interview ("What did you learn from you work experience?", "What do you think is difficult about being a doctor?", etc). Definitely write things down - thoughts/feelings/reflections as well as what actually happened.

    4. Wait for an appropriate moment but don't be afraid to ask questions. It can sometimes be awkward for staff to look after work experience students as they don't necessarily have much common ground (we can't easily "quiz" you on knowledge in the same way as medical students). Work experience students are often very nervous and clam up. Obviously you shouldn't aim to stop someone from doing their work but the occasional question will help you come across as keen, enthusiastic, and wanting to talk.

    Have fun!




    Thank you so much for the advice.
 
 
 
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