anneroojohnson
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Hey there. Earlier this year i have applied for Microbiology and have received two offers but i am starting to doubt the course that i have chosen.

My plan is to work in a hospital lab but from further reading, i think it is much better if i have chosen biomedical science instead.

So,should i take microbiology or biomedical science in order to work in a hospital lab?
I was thinking of getting a degree in microbiology and then a masters in biomedical science - can this get me into my career path?
Lastly, to anyone who has taken microbiology, what is your career now or what is your plan for the future?

Thank You
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Reality Check
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I would have thought that both would allow you to follow this career path. Have you done any research into, say, the NHS Scientist training courses?
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alleycat393
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TraineeBMS this is your area of expertise isn't it?

Just my 2p worth:
If you want to work in a hospital lab you want an accredited course (by the IBMS). There are a few different routes you can take and more info can be found here:
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...d-registration
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RegisteredBMS
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If you want to work in Microbiology I seriously suggest you go for BSc Healthcare Science. They offer an 'Infection Science' option which will include a 10 year generic rotational placement across the various pathology specialisms. After this you choose your specialism. If you choose Infection Science then you spend 15 weeks in the Summer between Year 2 and Year 3 followed by 4 days a week in Year 3 in an NHS laboratory in a Microbiology laboratory (including virology & serology).

This course is IBMS accredited and has a very unique feature in the fact it is a 3-year course yet you will become a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist by the end of it with a years experience in an NHS laboratory meaning that you are very employable.
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R.Newton
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Hi,

i am a microbiology student at the University of Glasgow and as part of our third year we exclusively study medical microbiology. We have close links with the NHS and we microbiology labs with the NHS at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. there is definitely scoop if you get a microbiology degree that you could work in a hospital. Microbiology is a valuable subject and the NHS and other groups hire microbiologists for a variety of biomedical roles as the skills you learn in Micro are transferable. But if you were to do infection control work or analysis work in a hospital a microbiology degree would be preferred.

i hope this has helped.
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anneroojohnson
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Thank you everyone for their replies. They're all really helpful.

Should i mention earlier that i am not from the uk?
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anneroojohnson
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(Original post by R.Newton)
Hi,

i am a microbiology student at the University of Glasgow and as part of our third year we exclusively study medical microbiology. We have close links with the NHS and we microbiology labs with the NHS at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. there is definitely scoop if you get a microbiology degree that you could work in a hospital. Microbiology is a valuable subject and the NHS and other groups hire microbiologists for a variety of biomedical roles as the skills you learn in Micro are transferable. But if you were to do infection control work or analysis work in a hospital a microbiology degree would be preferred.

i hope this has helped.
Well it did give me reassurance for sure. I've actually applied to University of Glasgow but i haven't heard from them. What is it like to study Microbiology there?
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R.Newton
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(Original post by anneroojohnson)
Well it did give me reassurance for sure. I've actually applied to University of Glasgow but i haven't heard from them. What is it like to study Microbiology there?

Hi,
studying Microbiology at Glasgow is great. It is an excellent school at the university thanks to the MRC virus research centres and the various experiments being conducted by our lecturers and researchers most notably Zika virus . Rest assured the teaching is excellent. In Glasgow for the first two years you don't study Microbiology exclusively rather study general biology. This is excellent as it allows you to get a flavour of the degrees on offer and decide what you want to do such as virology as opposed to Microbiology. I can't sell it enough Glasgow is an excellent university and don't worry if you haven't heard anything they can wait until March to send offers.

I hope this has been beneficial.

Regards,
R.NEWTON Student e-mentor with the ask a student service
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by anneroojohnson)
Well it did give me reassurance for sure. I've actually applied to University of Glasgow but i haven't heard from them. What is it like to study Microbiology there?
Just bare in mind you will have to do some time as a Band 2 medical laboratory assistant if you go with that route for your training portfolio.
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YselklaHosking
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Honestly, im the exact opposite!! Microbiology will allow you to do your career of choice, and if you arrive at uni and dont like the course, you should be able to switch courses.

I hope to do a career in drug research after a masters in microbiology
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Divya.George
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(Original post by YselklaHosking)
Honestly, im the exact opposite!! Microbiology will allow you to do your career of choice, and if you arrive at uni and dont like the course, you should be able to switch courses.

I hope to do a career in drug research after a masters in microbiology
I am also interested in the same route. I have a masters in Applied Microbiology from India but from 2003. Had a long career break with raising kids and volunteering in different things (I felt I decided on microbiology too early on, like age 12 and needed to explore). Now I feel the urge to return somehow (although I know it is incredibly difficult) but there is a gap of 14 years with no biology experience. Initially thought if I should try HNC applied biology n try to enter as a medical laboratory assistant or any other lab assistant role.

Eventually I am interested in research. I thought I hated laboratory work during my time of study in India but then again I was thinking that laboratory in UK would be very different and if the work is meaningful that has the highest priority right now.

Would you be able to advise me? Sorry for the very long post. Thank you.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Divya.George)
I am also interested in the same route. I have a masters in Applied Microbiology from India but from 2003. Had a long career break with raising kids and volunteering in different things (I felt I decided on microbiology too early on, like age 12 and needed to explore). Now I feel the urge to return somehow (although I know it is incredibly difficult) but there is a gap of 14 years with no biology experience. Initially thought if I should try HNC applied biology n try to enter as a medical laboratory assistant or any other lab assistant role.

Eventually I am interested in research. I thought I hated laboratory work during my time of study in India but then again I was thinking that laboratory in UK would be very different and if the work is meaningful that has the highest priority right now.

Would you be able to advise me? Sorry for the very long post. Thank you.
You mentioned medical and the rest was unclear to be but just so you're aware you are looking at a whole new degree if you want to progress to graduate level in NHS labs.
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Divya.George
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
You mentioned medical and the rest was unclear to be but just so you're aware you are looking at a whole new degree if you want to progress to graduate level in NHS labs.
I understand what you are saying BUT I do know that what is lacking in my case is the huge gap without experience and not necessarily the problem of accreditation as I understand that graduates of any relevant subject is eligible to apply for the STP programme to become a clinical scientist. If I had continued in my field as my peers did (many holding post docs in prestigious institution including Imperial College London) I wouldn't be worrying about medical lab assistant posts or accreditation for biomedical scientists for that matter.

If I am motivated enough to return to a serious career after raising kids I guess it should be obvious that I intend to go back to uni if that is what it takes.
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Divya.George
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(Original post by ecolier)
Just to add my 2 cents, you can do Medicine as a degree, train in (internal) Medicine and specialise in "Infectious DIseases & Tropical Medicine" or "Medical microbiology" - both specialties will involve some lab time in addition to clinical time.
Thank you. I really appreciate what you have suggested although everything seems quite bleak from where I am sitting. Need to get perspective real soon. Thank you so much for your encouraging response.
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farhikhan77
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hi there, I did graduation BS (four years) in microbiology and had 7 years of clinical laboratory experience in the back of my country. after got married I moved to the UK and having kids, eventually, I had a 4-year gap. I am planning to get my self registered from HCPC but the problem is that work gap. can anybody advise me what I need to do? I had applied some MLA posts and got an interview but they didn't go well ;(
(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
You mentioned medical and the rest was unclear to be but just so you're aware you are looking at a whole new degree if you want to progress to graduate level in NHS labs.
(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
If you want to work in Microbiology I seriously suggest you go for BSc Healthcare Science. They offer an 'Infection Science' option which will include a 10 year generic rotational placement across the various pathology specialisms. After this you choose your specialism. If you choose Infection Science then you spend 15 weeks in the Summer between Year 2 and Year 3 followed by 4 days a week in Year 3 in an NHS laboratory in a Microbiology laboratory (including virology & serology).

This course is IBMS accredited and has a very unique feature in the fact it is a 3-year course yet you will become a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist by the end of it with a years experience in an NHS laboratory meaning that you are very employable.
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RegisteredBMS
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You need to contact the IBMS. Their website has a section on international graduates.
(Original post by farhikhan77)
hi there, I did graduation BS (four years) in microbiology and had 7 years of clinical laboratory experience in the back of my country. after got married I moved to the UK and having kids, eventually, I had a 4-year gap. I am planning to get my self registered from HCPC but the problem is that work gap. can anybody advise me what I need to do? I had applied some MLA posts and got an interview but they didn't go well ;(
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farhikhan77
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Does this membership will help me to cover my 4-year gap to get registeration
(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
You need to contact the IBMS. Their website has a section on international graduates.
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RegisteredBMS
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No, I'm not saying apply for IBMS membership, I'm saying contact the IBMS for advise. I cannot offer generic advise since there are far too many factors involved here such as your education so far, your country of education, any experience in the field so far etc.

You need to get the IBMS to recognise your qualifications. Contact them.

https://www.ibms.org/join/overseas-applicants/
(Original post by farhikhan77)
Does this membership will help me to cover my 4-year gap to get registeration
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Brightside94
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Need biomedical science degree with accredited IBMS status or you will need to do top ups in future.

From this go into micro lab and complete registration portfolio on basic health and safety etc. Then specialise in microbiology through specialist portfolio.

Only way in to labs as scientist I’m afraid
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RegisteredBMS
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International situations are different and only the IBMS can advise. The outcomes can vary significantly.
(Original post by Brightside94)
Need biomedical science degree with accredited IBMS status or you will need to do top ups in future.

From this go into micro lab and complete registration portfolio on basic health and safety etc. Then specialise in microbiology through specialist portfolio.

Only way in to labs as scientist I’m afraid
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