Bristol combined mechanical and electrical engineering

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Cannoning
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#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi,
I was rejected from bristol for mechanical engineering, however, they said they would like to consider me for their new mechanical and electrical engineering degree (I would be in the first year to do it). This interests me but I was wondering how it would affect me if at the end I wanted to get a job in a purely mechanical or aerospace engineering role.

The main differences between straight mechanical, and the combined mechanical and electrical engineering degree seem to be that the combined one doesn't appear to have any modules on materials or computer-based modelling and it has 1 less module on fluid dynamics and quite a bit of electronics (obviously).
This is the link to the course info: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...l-engineering/

I also hold an offer for BEng mechanical engineering at UCL, but I preferred bristol when I visited.
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Smack
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Cannoning)
Hi,
I was rejected from bristol for mechanical engineering, however, they said they would like to consider me for their new mechanical and electrical engineering degree (I would be in the first year to do it). This interests me but I was wondering how it would affect me if at the end I wanted to get a job in a purely mechanical or aerospace engineering role.

The main differences between straight mechanical, and the combined mechanical and electrical engineering degree seem to be that the combined one doesn't appear to have any modules on materials or computer-based modelling and it has 1 less module on fluid dynamics and quite a bit of electronics (obviously).
This is the link to the course info: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...l-engineering/

I also hold an offer for BEng mechanical engineering at UCL, but I preferred bristol when I visited.
Probably won't affect you that much, if it does at all. My uni does a mechanical and electrical degree (which albeit very few people take) and from what I know those who graduated from it had no problems securing mechanical work. It is perhaps slightly concerning that there do not appear to be any modules on CAD, but you can learn this yourself.
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Cannoning
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Smack)
Probably won't affect you that much, if it does at all. My uni does a mechanical and electrical degree (which albeit very few people take) and from what I know those who graduated from it had no problems securing mechanical work. It is perhaps slightly concerning that there do not appear to be any modules on CAD, but you can learn this yourself.
Thanks. Do you think the lack of materials modules would be much of a disadvantage?
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Smack
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#4
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(Original post by Cannoning)
Thanks. Do you think the lack of materials modules would be much of a disadvantage?
What do you mean by materials modules? Just asking as some people mean solid mechanics when they say materials but others (like myself) mean materials science and engineering when they say materials.
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Cannoning
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#5
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(Original post by Smack)
What do you mean by materials modules? Just asking as some people mean solid mechanics when they say materials but others (like myself) mean materials science and engineering when they say materials.
Well on the mechanical engineering course it says there are modules such as materials 1 whereas there isn't that in the combined mechanical and electrical course. I'm guessing it would be to do with properties of different materials and how they fail. There is a thing called multi-physics finite element analysis on both though.
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Smack
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#6
(Original post by Cannoning)
Well on the mechanical engineering course it says there are modules such as materials 1 whereas there isn't that in the combined mechanical and electrical course. I'm guessing it would be to do with properties of different materials and how they fail. There is a thing called multi-physics finite element analysis on both though.
Won't really matter. A lot of what you learn during university isn't necessarily the same stuff you will be using if you are an engineer in industry, and a lot of what you do use on your job, you will learn on the job.
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Cannoning
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#7
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(Original post by Smack)
Won't really matter. A lot of what you learn during university isn't necessarily the same stuff you will be using if you are an engineer in industry, and a lot of what you do use on your job, you will learn on the job.
Ok, thanks for the help.
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Doones
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#8
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(Original post by Cannoning)
Hi,
I was rejected from bristol for mechanical engineering, however, they said they would like to consider me for their new mechanical and electrical engineering degree (I would be in the first year to do it). This interests me but I was wondering how it would affect me if at the end I wanted to get a job in a purely mechanical or aerospace engineering role.

The main differences between straight mechanical, and the combined mechanical and electrical engineering degree seem to be that the combined one doesn't appear to have any modules on materials or computer-based modelling and it has 1 less module on fluid dynamics and quite a bit of electronics (obviously).
This is the link to the course info: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...l-engineering/

I also hold an offer for BEng mechanical engineering at UCL, but I preferred bristol when I visited.
So long as it's accredited by iMechE it's fine.

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Cannoning
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#9
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(Original post by jneill)
So long as it's accredited by iMechE it's fine.

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Thanks, the degree is new so it isn't accredited yet but I'll ask them what accredditation it will get.

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Doones
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Cannoning)
Thanks, the degree is new so it isn't accredited yet but I'll ask them what accredditation it will get.

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I'm sure Bristol will get it accredited by the time you graduate.

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zootzoot
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Cannoning)
Thanks, the degree is new so it isn't accredited yet but I'll ask them what accredditation it will get.

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Did u choose to go to Bristol in the end for this course and how was it (And what did they say about accreditation)
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Bensayfyourdad
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Cannoning)
Hi,
I was rejected from bristol for mechanical engineering, however, they said they would like to consider me for their new mechanical and electrical engineering degree (I would be in the first year to do it). This interests me but I was wondering how it would affect me if at the end I wanted to get a job in a purely mechanical or aerospace engineering role.

The main differences between straight mechanical, and the combined mechanical and electrical engineering degree seem to be that the combined one doesn't appear to have any modules on materials or computer-based modelling and it has 1 less module on fluid dynamics and quite a bit of electronics (obviously).
This is the link to the course info: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...l-engineering/

I also hold an offer for BEng mechanical engineering at UCL, but I preferred bristol when I visited.
Hey did you end up doing the combined course at Bristol, or know anything knew about whether the course is good or not? I have to firm in less than a week.
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