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Reapplying to Cambridge: Guide for Reapplicants watch

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    Disclaimer: Most of my experience have been with the Cambridge admissions process and I am unfamiliar with the nuances with the Oxford admissions process. Nevertheless, most of the information provided here can be applicable to most situations. I have no official affiliation with either university and a lot of my information come from personal experience and anecdotes but I hope some of the information here will be useful.

    This is still a WIP.

    CHAPTER I - Preface:
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    Every year, there are many Oxbridge applicants that ultimately fail to secure an offer. At least some of these applicants will consider reapplying to get another shot at getting into the best of the best. Perhaps you are one of them? If so, hopefully this guide will give you some things to consider if you do decide to reapply. If you are on the fence about reapplying, this guide will hopefully provide some balanced insight into reapplying. If you are dead set on reapplying, then maybe this will act as a consolidation of all the things you might need to consider as a reapplicant. Whatever you are feeling right now and whatever you end up deciding to do, I wish you the best of luck in the future.
    Deciding to reapply is undoubtedly a hard decision and there are all sorts of reasons why someone might decide to reapply. Perhaps the course at Oxbridge is unique and there is really no substitute at a different university. Maybe the collegiate and supervision systems are too attractive to consider somewhere else. It could quite simply be that they want to get into the best university and anything less feels like a failure to them. Whatever the reason, a great deal of thought is required. Consult your friends, your family and your teachers but it is important to remember that it is ultimately your decision. It is perfectly fine to go against all the advice you are given as long as you know you have made the right decision in your heart. It is your life to live, not theirs.
    Before we get any further, allow me to introduce myself. What makes me qualified to write this? Well, I have been through this all before. I know what it feels like to get rejected from Cambridge. I certainly did not take it well at the time and I started not turning up to lessons or doing any work. I did not see the point after getting rejected despite my rational mind constantly trying to convince myself that I would be happy elsewhere. After all, I managed to receive a conditional offer from Imperial College and that was certainly nothing to scoff at! However, no matter what I did, I just could not shake off the feeling of inadequacy and this feeling kept with me until the end of the school year and the start of my final A-level exams. Luckily for me, I had never really had to work hard to do well in exams up to that point and two weeks of preparation was enough for me to achieve top grades in my subjects.
    Results day was a bittersweet occasion. I was obviously happy with the grades I achieved but it was at that point that my decision to reapply to Cambridge was finalised. I was fortunate to already have an industrial placement lined up for me through my gap year having applied via the YINI (Year in Industry) scheme at the same time as when I was applying to university in order to keep my options open. Instead of asking Imperial College to defer my confirmed offer for a year, I kindly rejected them so I could reapply to Cambridge. It was a risky decision at the time but I could not have hoped for a better outcome. Currently, I am almost halfway through my industrial placement holding an unconditional offer from Cambridge and this gap year potentially being the best year of my life so far.
    There are some definite advantages reapplicants would have over applicants applying for the first time. The most obvious being that you would already know and have your grades when applying. For the majority of subjects, achieving the required grades would almost certainly result in an unconditional offer (should you get one) which can be reassuring for many people. Exams and grades will be discussed in greater detail later on. Another topic that will be discussed more in a later section but is also relevant here are gap years. They do not need to be a negative thing! Indeed, many people in general thoroughly enjoy their gap years and never look back as a result. An extra year of life experience and maturity would never be seen as a bad thing and this will hopefully come across during the interviews.
    The final advantage I am going to discuss here (though there are many more) is having the knowledge of the application process compared to first-time applicants. No matter how much research one has done into the application process; nothing beats first-hand experience. This is especially true for any admissions assessments or interviews that you, as a reapplicant, may have already taken. You have already been through the whole process before and therefore, you are at an innate advantage.
    However, it is also important to be aware of the risks involved with such a decision as well. Just like there is no guarantee that you will get an offer the second time around, the same applies to all the other universities you have applied for. You might not receive an offer from a university that gave you an offer the year previously and consequently, you might have no choice other than to go to a university that is lower down in your preferences.
    It is important to note here that Cambridge does not allow reapplicants if you are already holding a deferred offer from another U.K. university. For example, it is not possible to reapply to Cambridge while holding a deferred offer from Manchester. Similarly, it is generally frowned upon to reapply to Cambridge if you are already at university and Cambridge usually is unwilling to take a student who is already enrolled at a different university. There are some slight differences for Oxford but generally, it is a less than ideal scenario.
    Another risk could be that you could feel like you have wasted a year if you do not succeed the second time. In reality, this is almost always not the case. As mentioned before, a lot of people find great enjoyment during their gap years and there is always something you could do during your gap year. Perhaps you might find starting university a year later than most people around you uncomfortable. Admittedly, I was not keen on the idea of starting university a year later compared to my peers at first. However, it did not take me long at all to realise a year makes virtually no difference to anything. A year is absolutely no time at all in the grand scheme of things and no one will care that you are a year older (or even notice for that matter).
    In complete honesty, it is fairly hard for me to come up with many negatives or risks involved in reapplying to Oxbridge. Taking a gap year almost always has a positive impact on your life and affords you the opportunity to be able to reapply to Oxbridge. I can completely understand if you would rather just go straight to university and move on with your life and I would fully support your decision if you were absolutely sure. However, for the people that are in doubt at the moment, I would highly recommend giving this alternative a serious consideration. After all, one should not give up on a dream after the first hurdle, right?




    CHAPTER II - Exams and Grades
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    We briefly touched upon exams and grades in the previous chapter where a post-qualification application can be highly advantageous to a reapplicant. Indeed, in the case of almost all courses at Cambridge (the exceptions being Mathematics and Medicine), achieving above a certain threshold in certain qualifications will allow you to automatically qualify for the Winter Pool (see the Cambridge website for details of the Winter Pool). In practical terms, qualifying for auto-pooling guarantees an interview invite from your chosen college which can lessen the pressure in other areas of your application.
    This threshold currently stands at achieving a minimum of A*A*A* at A-level or a total of 42 points with a score of 7, 7, 6 at Higher Level in the International Baccalaureate (IB). In the case of an application to a science subject, the 3 A-level subjects have to be either Maths or Science subjects. For the IB, 2 of the 3 subjects at Higher Level must be either Maths or Science subjects. Thresholds exist for a small number of other qualifications but only the most common ones are listed here. While such a system does not exist at Oxford (as far as I am aware), a strong set of grades will nevertheless put you in a strong position to succeed.
    In almost all cases, achieving at least the minimum grades would mean you will be given an unconditional offer if you are successful. Thus, if you accept the offer, you will be guaranteed a place regardless of what you do for the remainder of your gap year. However, it is important to realise that many successful first-time applicants actually go on to eventually exceed the minimum grade requirements. Ideally, this means that as a reapplicant, you should aim to exceed the minimum grade requirements for your chosen course. At Cambridge, this will typically involve achieving A*A*A* for science courses and A*A*A for non-science courses. There is also an argument to be made that perhaps even achieving “just” A*A*A* is not ideal for the most competitive of courses such as the Cambridge Natural Sciences course. Quite a significant amount of the applicants for the most competitive courses would be offering 4 A-level subjects and then go on to eventually achieve A*A*A*A* or A*A*A*A. While 4 A-levels is certainly not a requirement and many applicants do get in with 3 A-levels, a reapplicant that offers 4 A-levels with the highest of grades has a good chance of being successful. Perhaps consider studying another A-level during your gap year? This has a potential downside of receiving a conditional offer based on the subject you are studying during your gap year but it might be a worthwhile trade-off.
    The situation is arguably more extreme leaning towards the side of a reapplicant that has only barely achieved the minimum requirements to get into Cambridge. Due to the significant amount of applicants that eventually goes on to exceed the minimum requirements, a reapplicant that has only just met the minimum requirements might not be seen in that high of a light. Indeed, it is actually very rare for a reapplicant to be successful having only met the minimum requirements and it is the case that the majority of successful reapplicants exceeded the requirements.
    This is perhaps the most important consideration when deciding whether to reapply or not. The advantage of reapplying knowing you already have the grades is largely gone if it is unlikely that you will be successful due to your grades being on the lower side of the spectrum. For example, an Engineering reapplicant with the grades of A*A*A*A has a good chance of being successful whereas a reapplicant with the grades of A*A*A is unlikely to be successful (with perhaps the exception of significant extenuating circumstances). Oxbridge also generally do not like applicants that have to resit any exams although one or two resits can be understandable. Although resits are becoming less and less relevant due to the A-level reforms, some subjects such as Mathematics would still likely accept resits in the next few years.
    Therefore, I would always recommend accepting an offer from another university during the current application cycle and holding onto that offer until after results day even if you are absolutely certain that you would be reapplying. That way, you have a contingency plan if things do not go as planned and you did not achieve the grades necessary for Oxbridge (bearing in mind what I said before about ideally exceeding the minimum requirements). You would also have a lot of time after results day to decide the best course of action since you will know your final grades by then. Should I reapply? Or should I just go to university this year? Remember you will have the support and advice of your friends, teachers and parents during this time.
    Naturally, as Oxbridge are very much academically focused and require the highest of grades, exams and attaining the top grades are crucial especially as a potential reapplicant. This might seem obvious but it is important to emphasise the need to do well in your final exams and is worthy of a short discussion. I am not going to go into detail about how to revise, exam technique, etc. because quite frankly, that will take ages and it has been done many, many times before. A simple online search will probably bring up hundreds of different websites and articles for each of those topics and so it seems pointless to regurgitate the same information and advice that has been given time and time again.
    However, what I would say is to think carefully about your priorities. What I mean by this is you should consider whether Oxbridge would suit you academically. If you are starting to revise right now and find it way too tedious and boring then perhaps Oxbridge would not be good of a fit for you and you might suit a different university much better. Likewise, if it takes you a ridiculous amount of time to grasp fairly simple ideas and concepts and you have to spend a ridiculous amount of hours on revision to achieve the necessary grades then perhaps Oxbridge will not ideal for you.
    I do not mean this in an overly harsh way but sometimes it will work out better for you personally if you accept that you just might not suit Oxbridge. It will almost never make any difference in your future career whichever university you go to. Trust me when I say this as I have seen first-hand how my current company are deciding who to interview for their internships and graduate programs (which included reading and assessing many of the CVs). Many of you will be turning 18 this year and many have already turned 18. Now is a great time to be going out drinking, partying and just having fun. If you find you cannot have a social life because you are spending all your time revising to get the necessary grades then I would argue that Oxbridge probably will not suit you and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.



    CHAPTER III - Gap Years
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    This is probably going to be the chapter I most enjoy writing. Bearing in mind that I am only halfway through my gap year at the time of writing, I now cannot imagine not having done a gap year. While I fully appreciate that some people prefer to just go straight to university, I could not recommend a gap year more highly enough. It is completely natural to be apprehensive about a gap year especially if one of the main reasons you are doing one in the first is so you can reapply to Oxbridge. However, I hope to convince you in this chapter that a gap year is in fact a very worthwhile thing as well as give you some advice and ideas for your gap year.
    There is a reason why almost everyone who takes a gap year enjoys them. Anecdotally, most of my friends on gap years seem to be enjoying their gap years whereas a significant number of my other friends seem to have struggled to settle into their first year at university. While I am not saying people who take gap years would not struggle to settle into university, I am going to say that an extra year in your life before university can be invaluable.
    A year may not seem like much but the year gives you an extra layer of maturity before starting university than you would have had otherwise. At the age of 18, a whole year as a fully functioning adult in the real world is arguably much more beneficial than being flung straight into university and dealing with typical student problems.
    Obviously, this extra layer of maturity is completely dependent on the activities you do during the year. Staying in your room the whole year is neither productive nor smart! To fully embrace the benefits of a gap year, you have to engage with everything and everyone around you. Be proactive, be organised but most importantly, be excited that the next couple of months in your life could turn out to be best months in your life.
    For everyone that is even considering reapplying to Oxbridge, it is a good idea to have a think right now (before your final exams) about what you might want to do during a gap year should you ultimately decide to reapply. This might seem contradictory to my advice in the previous chapter where I said to wait until after results day before deciding to take a gap year but let me explain. You do not need a foolproof concrete plan for what you plan to do during the gap year but it would be a good idea to start some initial research on what you might end up doing. This is especially the case if you want to try getting an internship or some work experience. You should be looking at some of the options open for you. For example, YINI help facilitate year-long placements for anyone who might want to work in industry for a year before starting university (see their website for more details).
    However, it is also fine to not having anything planned by the time you have to make the decision because you did not anticipate taking a gap year. Let us imagine a likely scenario. You got rejected from Oxford for History in the current cycle and therefore accepted a conditional offer to study History at Durham. You did not feel the exams went well at all and feel that you would be lucky to even secure the place at Durham. However, on results day, it turns out you managed to get the top grade in all your subjects thus forming a very competitive application should you decide to reapply. Eventually, after much deliberation, you do decide to take a gap year and reapply but you decide to apply to Cambridge instead because you decided Cambridge was better. However, you did not plan anything because you did not anticipate taking a gap year. So what now?
    There is definitely some appeal to “going with the flow”. This is great for people who are more spontaneous but it does not suit everyone. However, you do have the luxury of time on your hands. It is important to remember you do not have to make the decision straight away. Think about it carefully. It is an irreversible decision to make. Are you happy to take a risk and reject a guaranteed offer to study at a university? Are you happy in taking a gap year and trying to make the most of it? Are you happy with the decision irrespective of what anyone else says? If you can (somewhat) confidently answer yes to all these questions, then congratulations! You have just made the first major step towards reapplying and having a successful gap year.
    Unfortunately, for the large majority of us, spending the entire gap year travelling and going on adventures is simply unrealistic and unaffordable. Even for the lucky ones among us who can afford such endeavours, you have to remain in the country for the first few months anyway in order to take any assessments and attend the interviews. The lack of funds can somewhat limit the possibilities available during your gap year. There is a straightforward solution – get a job.
    This is easier said than done of course. However, even a job working at a restaurant or in retail can be the difference between having money and not. Not only does it enhance your CV, it can also be the difference in determining if you can afford to spend time travelling during your gap year. By working for the first few months and gradually saving up, there are endless possibilities in the final few months for whatever you want to do. You have to work on your UCAS application again anyway so why not work and earn some money at the same time?
    I think it would be wise at this point to take a step back and consider what a gap year really means. Ideally, it is a year out of education to enhance your life in meaningful ways. What does this mean in practice? For starters, everyone has different priorities and things they find ‘meaningful’. So it is logical to conclude that a gap year should aim to enhance and develop the skills that you think would most benefit you. To put a different spin on things, a gap year could well be the only year since before GCSEs and until after university where you will not have any exams at the end of the academic year. Therefore, you are not required to study at all during a gap year. That is not to say you should not study at all (especially if you are reapplying) but there is a difference between keeping your skills sharp for the assessments and interviews and spending a large portion of your time trying to learn new, complex material. Obviously, I am not trying to discourage anyone wanting to study and if that is what you enjoy then by all means go ahead. However, it is my opinion that a gap year should be a year out of strict academic study (resitting exams and studying new A-levels being the exceptions) in order to pursue and develop new skills, interests and hobbies. Do things that you have never had the time to do before. Go out of your comfort zone. Explore the possibilities.
    A logical follow-up question would be – what are the skills, interests, etc. I should be developing? That answer will be different for everyone and it comes down to what is ultimately meaningful to you. Have you always wanted to learn a musical instrument and have not had the time until now? Perhaps you have always wanted to learn computer programming? Maybe you want to focus on getting fit by going to the gym because you were always too lazy before? The key point here is to actually go out and do it! A gap year is not the time to start procrastinating – you should be doing things that you enjoy.
    The final issue I will address here is travel. Some form of travelling during a gap year is a natural rite of passage for anyone taking one. You have spent the majority of your gap year working and saving up but it is getting to end of gap year, it is the summer and you just want to splash some cash by going abroad. Again, it is completely down to your interests to determine what you want to do and where you want to travel. The summer months are naturally a good time to go travelling and act as a relaxing transition period between finishing a job and going to university (hopefully Oxbridge). There is also the added bonus that all of your friends who have gone to university will have finished university by this time and so a holiday with your friends is a definite possibility (although this will require planning a few months prior).
    An alternative would be to go travelling on your own. I completely understand the reservation one might have with travelling on their own but it is worth considering. You will not be the first to travel on your own and you certainly will not be the last. In most cases, it is actually much easier to travel on your own. You have much more freedom in deciding what you want to do and you do not have to worry about anyone else. The idea of travelling abroad alone can be quite daunting but it is a valuable learning experience as well.
    My advice for travelling would be to explore the different options open to you. Europe? South America? East Asia? Make sure you take into account your total budget. Do some initial research on a few places you would like to visit and get a feel for the cost of the whole trip. Set aside a portion of that money as emergency money which you will endeavour not to spend (I would personally set aside enough to cover a return trip home if something unexpected happens) and see the amount left over. Is there enough money left over to cover all the expenses for your trip? This will hopefully help to shortlist a selection of places.
    Now it would be a good idea to do some further detailed research on each of these areas. What activities would you want to do there? What is the food and hotel prices like? How might you minimalise the costs as much as possible? Hopefully this will lead to a final decision on where you would like to visit. If you really cannot decide between a few places, chances are you will be happy visiting any of the locations on your list. Pick one randomly out of the list and you can always spend the next few summers visiting the other locations.
    It might be worth reminding you here that travelling is a completely optional part of a gap year. Ultimately, the reason why you might have decided to take a gap year was to be able to reapply to Oxbridge. You can choose to ignore everything I have discussed here and spend the time focusing on getting in and studying instead. That is your choice and there is nothing wrong with that. However, I am here to try change the perceptive of a gap year. Hopefully, you will later realise that instead of being forced into gap year just so you can reapply, you can appreciate that you are taking a gap year on its own merits. A reapplication is just a bonus.




    WIP
    CHAPTER IV - Choosing a Course and College
    CHAPTER V - Personal Statement
    CHAPTER VI - Admissions Assessments
    CHAPTER VII - Interviews
    CHAPTER VIII - Decisions


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    NeverLucky


    Thanks for the insightful posts

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    As a prospective reapplicant, it is pretty helpful although probably not going to do it!
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    Ah, awesome thread, thanks for tagging me!

    My only suggestion at the mo is to break up the paragraphs if pos

    I assume, although I could be wrong that A*AA is competitive for Oxford for those subjects asking AAA and A*A*A for those asking for A*AA. But of course, the more A* grades the better. Also the grades would be contextualised and as Never_Lucky suggests, extenuating cicrumstances would apply.
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    Thanks for the tag. I'll have a read!
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
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    As a prospective reapplicant, it is pretty helpful although probably not going to do it!

    O rly?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    O rly?
    Rly :lol:

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    If I do get the grades to reapply, there might be an Oxford specific version of these lmao
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    NeverLucky I'm still reading it (! ), but just on the 3 or 4 A-level bit: Cambridge are very clear that 3 A-levels are as competitive as 4. In particular, the point about it being useful having 4 for NatSci is just that it can give you more options when selecting your modules - not that it makes an applicant more competitive.

    Also a re-applicant can't really change their A-level profile - it's too late - so I wouldn't want to in any way discourage a 3 A-level applicant just on that basis. Ok?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    NeverLucky I'm still reading it (! ), but just on the 3 or 4 A-level bit: Cambridge are very clear that 3 A-levels are as competitive as 4. In particular, the point about it being useful having 4 for NatSci is just that it can give you more options when selecting your modules - not that it makes an applicant more competitive.

    Also a re-applicant can't really change their A-level profile - it's too late - so I wouldn't want to in any way discourage a 3 A-level applicant just on that basis. Ok?
    Noted, I'll rewrite that bit and update it in the next few days.
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    What a wonderful and informative guide Thanks for doing this NeverLucky, I think that it will be invaluable for future re-applicants.
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    Tagging some (successful) Oxbridge re-applicants: scblx TheTechN1304 Duke Glacia physicsmaths BritishBean
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    Also 'Indeed, it is actually very rare for a reapplicant to be successful having only met the minimum requirements and it is the case that the majority of successful reapplicants exceeded the requirements.'

    This is definitely true however it does depend on interview performance and the course in question. Don't know about Cambridge but I know that for my course (music) if you get an "A*" grade at interview that equates with an 'offer' - hence why there was at least one person accepted with a C at A level from the statistics they gave me (although that person could have gotten A*A*AC or such). The average grades of post-qual people given offers were A*AA (so exceeding the standard offer) but they'd take into account any extenuating circumstances and contextual factors (eg illness, terrible school etc). The more competitive the course obviously the higher the grades you'll need to get.

    Just noticed this NeverLucky 'decide to apply to Cambridge instead because you decided Cambridge was better' :rolleyes:
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    This is a useful resource, but as Doonesbury says there are some mistakes in Chapter 2. In particular, the second paragraph contains some errors. The standard offer for NatSci is A*A*A, and I don't think any student should be advised to 'take another A level in your gap year' if they've 'only' got 3. I suspect that for many applicants who've been rejected post interview, looking at how they could have improved their interview or any admissions tests would be more relevant advice than the A levels, because the college has already assessed those (assuming that the applicant met the predicted grades of A*A*A) and offered an interview on the back of them.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    I suspect that for many applicants who've been rejected post interview, looking at how they could have improved their interview or any admissions tests would be more relevant advice than the A levels, because the college has already assessed those (assuming that the applicant met the predicted grades of A*A*A) and offered an interview on the back of them.
    This is true. As long as someone exceeds the requirement for their course (eg A*AA for most arts at Oxford, A*A*A for arts at Cambridge, A*A*A for most sciences at Oxford, A*A*A* for sciences at Cambridge) the grades won't be the issue - but obviously, the higher the grades the more it 'compensates' (for lack of a better term) at interview.

    I suspect however if someone had less than ideal AS grades (eg AABB), even with strong A2 predictions, the grades could have been a contributing factor first time around.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Just noticed this NeverLucky 'decide to apply to Cambridge instead because you decided Cambridge was better' :rolleyes:
    Was hoping someone would notice that :lol:

    (Original post by Reality Check)
    This is a useful resource, but as Doonesbury says there are some mistakes in Chapter 2. In particular, the second paragraph contains some errors. The standard offer for NatSci is A*A*A, and I don't think any student should be advised to 'take another A level in your gap year' if they've 'only' got 3. I suspect that for many applicants who've been rejected post interview, looking at how they could have improved their interview or any admissions tests would be more relevant advice than the A levels, because the college has already assessed those (assuming that the applicant met the predicted grades of A*A*A) and offered an interview on the back of them.
    Yep, I've rewritten parts of that chapter and will update it the next time I come to writing.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Ah, awesome thread, thanks for tagging me!

    My only suggestion at the mo is to break up the paragraphs if pos

    I assume, although I could be wrong that A*AA is competitive for Oxford for those subjects asking AAA and A*A*A for those asking for A*AA. But of course, the more A* grades the better. Also the grades would be contextualised and as Never_Lucky suggests, extenuating cicrumstances would apply.
    The Oxford and Cambridge attitudes to A-level grades are massively different. Without extenuating circumstances, in Oxford they are viewed very much as a requirement that is either met (allowing the application to progress further) or not met (meaning that the applicant is rejected pre-interview). Based on the LMH Oxford Q&A thread, is no advantage to exceeding the standard offer when applying post-qualification since decisions are made almost entirely from the admissions test and interviews.
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    (Original post by Forecast)
    The Oxford and Cambridge attitudes to A-level grades are massively different. Without extenuating circumstances, in Oxford they are viewed very much as a requirement that is either met (allowing the application to progress further) or not met (meaning that the applicant is rejected pre-interview). Based on the LMH Oxford Q&A thread, is no advantage to exceeding the standard offer when applying post-qualification since decisions are made almost entirely from the admissions test and interviews.
    Ah, really interesting - thanks for the info!! (Also mildly reassuring, I'm pretty confident for AAA/A*AA but A*A*A is a bit harder hehe)
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    Forecast I asked LMH on the "AMA" page and they said "Although we take into account academic achievement, having achieved the standard offer demonstrating enthusiasm/suitability for course/suitability for our teaching as demonstrated through subject tests (if applicable) and interviews becomes more important."

    So that reiterates what you suggested - that after getting AAA/A*AA it becomes much more a case of interview/subject test performance. I guess this is much more true of post-qual applicants because attainment is certain rather than based on predicted grades (which are notoriously glowing and unreliable anyways).
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    I've decided that I won't be reapplying for HSPS. Whatever I do during a potential gap year, I don't think I'd be able to return to such intense study after a fairly lax year.

    Applying to Cambridge was definitely an experience, I'm very happy I did so and it was nice to have a dream to latch onto for two years.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    I've decided that I won't be reapplying for HSPS. Whatever I do during a potential gap year, I don't think I'd be able to return to such intense study after a fairly lax year.

    Applying to Cambridge was definitely an experience, I'm very happy I did so and it was nice to have a dream to latch onto for two years.
    Fair enough, I'm sure you'll do amazing wherever!

    (The only thing to say is that Oxford/Cambridge is tough and intense whether you come straight from school or after a gap year but it's your life and I won't sway you )
 
 
 

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