Best revision methods ?? Watch

han10
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What do you think are the best revision methods you can do to revise for GCSE's? I want to know how other people are revising for:

English Language & Literature 9-1
Mathematics
Biology, Chemistry, Physics

It would be helpful if you guys gave any advice on successful revision methods (that actually work!) for these subjects.

Thanks
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mdnvmpr
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(Original post by han10)
What do you think are the best revision methods you can do to revise for GCSE's? I want to know how other people are revising for:

English Language & Literature 9-1
Mathematics
Biology, Chemistry, Physics

It would be helpful if you guys gave any advice on successful revision methods (that actually work!) for these subjects.

Thanks
I find basing any reviison on topic rather than time is always useful, and really ensures you're not wasting any time or not spending enough time on things that you need to. Although saying this, I think one of the best techniques out there is the Pomodoro Technique. You can google it and find out more but essentially you split your revision into 25 minutes chunks with 5 minute breaks in between and is an ideal amount of time to be able to complete a task without losing focus. If you reach the end of the 25 minutes and find you are still unsure, take a break and continue into the next 25 minutes - I think this technique is probably the most effective.

I learnt a piece of advice from here that I find is also very useful when studying , particularly maths, and that is not to practise questions until you get them right, but to pratise questions until you cannot get them wrong. For some reason this has stuck with me and I now alaways question how much Ir really know after revising.

Practise papers are always a good way of revising - but you need to know the content first.
I think the best ways of doing this are to take notes on a topic, and then rewrite the notes, but condense them into smaller and smaller sections until eventually you're left with only a few words on a topic. Then, do the same but in reverse and each time slowly expand your notes until you have practically tge same information you had to begin with.
Once you have done this, you can read back over what you have written and compare it to the original notes, and highlight anything you missed out, this part is especially useful, as it helps you to focus on what you are not absorbing and you are more likely to remember it if you are highlighting it.
I use these methods for the sciences, and find them particularly useful, but again, past papers are also useful as liong as you are checking your answers and noting what you are missing.

In terms of English, I mostly find it useful to just familiarise myself with the text as much as possible. Find creative ways of memorising 3/4 qutes for each character and theme in the texts and try practising essays for each, to get a feel for what you would write in the actual exam. I recommend mrbruffs youtube channel for general revision - for both Lit and Language.
For language it is useful to read newspapers and persuasive texts to get an idea of how different techniques can be used effectively and convincingly in a piece of writing - also memorising some kind of mnemonic like DAFOREST which includes all of the techniques you need to gain a high mark. The formulaic approach isn't ideal, but it's really the best way to ensure you include everything.

I hope this helps
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han10
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(Original post by mdnvmpr)
I find basing any reviison on topic rather than time is always useful, and really ensures you're not wasting any time or not spending enough time on things that you need to. Although saying this, I think one of the best techniques out there is the Pomodoro Technique. You can google it and find out more but essentially you split your revision into 25 minutes chunks with 5 minute breaks in between and is an ideal amount of time to be able to complete a task without losing focus. If you reach the end of the 25 minutes and find you are still unsure, take a break and continue into the next 25 minutes - I think this technique is probably the most effective.

I learnt a piece of advice from here that I find is also very useful when studying , particularly maths, and that is not to practise questions until you get them right, but to pratise questions until you cannot get them wrong. For some reason this has stuck with me and I now alaways question how much Ir really know after revising.

Practise papers are always a good way of revising - but you need to know the content first.
I think the best ways of doing this are to take notes on a topic, and then rewrite the notes, but condense them into smaller and smaller sections until eventually you're left with only a few words on a topic. Then, do the same but in reverse and each time slowly expand your notes until you have practically tge same information you had to begin with.
Once you have done this, you can read back over what you have written and compare it to the original notes, and highlight anything you missed out, this part is especially useful, as it helps you to focus on what you are not absorbing and you are more likely to remember it if you are highlighting it.
I use these methods for the sciences, and find them particularly useful, but again, past papers are also useful as liong as you are checking your answers and noting what you are missing.

In terms of English, I mostly find it useful to just familiarise myself with the text as much as possible. Find creative ways of memorising 3/4 qutes for each character and theme in the texts and try practising essays for each, to get a feel for what you would write in the actual exam. I recommend mrbruffs youtube channel for general revision - for both Lit and Language.
For language it is useful to read newspapers and persuasive texts to get an idea of how different techniques can be used effectively and convincingly in a piece of writing - also memorising some kind of mnemonic like DAFOREST which includes all of the techniques you need to gain a high mark. The formulaic approach isn't ideal, but it's really the best way to ensure you include everything.

I hope this helps
Thank you so much! Very helpful advice
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