coconut64
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Hi, in the table I know that for 3, both the dichromate ions and the H+ ions are the oxidising agent. Does it mean that for 7, both HCOOH and H+ are oxidising agents too?

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charco
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(Original post by coconut64)
Hi, in the table I know that for 3, both the dichromate ions and the H+ ions are the oxidising agent. Does it mean that for 7, both HCOOH and H+ are oxidising agents too?

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No, the hydrogen ions do not change oxidation state.
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coconut64
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(Original post by charco)
No, the hydrogen ions do not change oxidation state.
But why is it that in the redox system involving the dichromate ions, the oxidising agent are both the dichromate ions and the H+ ions?
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charco
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(Original post by coconut64)
But why is it that in the redox system involving the dichromate ions, the oxidising agent are both the dichromate ions and the H+ ions?
They are not.

The oxidising agent is the dichromate. It is acting as an oxidising agent in an acidic environment.

Oxidising agents behave differently in acid and basic conditions.
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coconut64
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(Original post by charco)
They are not.

The oxidising agent is the dichromate. It is acting as an oxidising agent in an acidic environment.

Oxidising agents behave differently in acid and basic conditions.
According to this paper Q6b), they are ...
Question: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/131289-...d-elements.pdf

answer http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/135166-...ments-june.pdf

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h3rmit
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(Original post by coconut64)
According to this paper Q6b), they are ...
Question: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/131289-...d-elements.pdf

answer http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/135166-...ments-june.pdf

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The protons are required for the dichromate ions to oxidise whatever they're oxidising. However, as the protons are not changing oxidation state, they can't have reduced anything and hence aren't oxidising agents themselves. The "acidified dichromate" in the allows shows that the protons are required in the presence of the oxidising agent for proper oxidation
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coconut64
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(Original post by h3rmit)
The protons are required for the dichromate ions to oxidise whatever they're oxidising. However, as the protons are not changing oxidation state, they can't have reduced anything and hence aren't oxidising agents themselves. The "acidified dichromate" in the allows shows that the protons are required in the presence of the oxidising agent for proper oxidation
I get what you are saying but in the mark scheme, H+ ions are still described as an oxidising agent though
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h3rmit
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(Original post by coconut64)
I get what you are saying but in the mark scheme, H+ ions are still described as an oxidising agent though
Not specifically, it only says you need the dichromate ions and the protons, because acidified dichromate is an oxidising agent, but dichromate alone is not

If it had the protons and the dichromate on two separate lines, that would imply two separate oxidising agents
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