UEA or Uni of Birmingham?

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    Got an offer for English and Creative Writing at both unis, but I'm struggling to decide which one as I love them both. Birmingham is closer to me, great nightlife, but Norwich is a really beautiful place and I loved the uni, halls etc. Equally, love the course at Birmingham, the uni is beautiful, halls are fairly nice.

    I just cannot decide!
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    (Original post by EstelleAntonia)
    Got an offer for English and Creative Writing at both unis, but I'm struggling to decide which one as I love them both. Birmingham is closer to me, great nightlife, but Norwich is a really beautiful place and I loved the uni, halls etc. Equally, love the course at Birmingham, the uni is beautiful, halls are fairly nice.

    I just cannot decide!
    Hey

    Congratulations on both of your offers!

    You seem to have identified what is important to you outside of the course but what I would suggest is honing in and looking at both courses and deciding which one is the better fit for you! Look at the modules in depth because each uni offers different modules in the same course. There may be a module in UEA which is not in UBirmingham and vice-versa. The course is the most important first and foremost imo because you are there to get an education after all!

    I am also tagging University of East Anglia to give more insight into their university and of course to show that Norwich's night life is not that bad!

    I hope this helps! Good luck
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    (Original post by EstelleAntonia)
    Got an offer for English and Creative Writing at both unis, but I'm struggling to decide which one as I love them both. Birmingham is closer to me, great nightlife, but Norwich is a really beautiful place and I loved the uni, halls etc. Equally, love the course at Birmingham, the uni is beautiful, halls are fairly nice.

    I just cannot decide!
    I agree with Wolfmoon88, looking at the course should be your deal breaker here.
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    Some things to think about :

    1) City or Campus Uni - both have advantages/plus-points but its a personal thing and only you can decide.
    2) Course - that is what you will be studying every day for three years, not the Uni, so choose the one with the best options for you.
    3) CW is a weak degree subject. It wont lead you into an obvious career area, and many mainstream employers regard it as a silly degree. So ... which Uni is going to give you the best 'extras', like study abroad, units in other subjects etc that are going to give you something else to put on your CV?
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Some things to think about :

    1) City or Campus Uni - both have advantages/plus-points but its a personal thing and only you can decide.
    2) Course - that is what you will be studying every day for three years, not the Uni, so choose the one with the best options for you.
    3) CW is a weak degree subject. It wont lead you into an obvious career area, and many mainstream employers regard it as a silly degree. So ... which Uni is going to give you the best 'extras', like study abroad, units in other subjects etc that are going to give you something else to put on your CV?
    Thank you for the first two points, but I disagree that English Literature and Creative Writing is a 'weak degree subject,' especially considering that my aim is to become a published writer....
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    Hey

    Congratulations on both of your offers!

    You seem to have identified what is important to you outside of the course but what I would suggest is honing in and looking at both courses and deciding which one is the better fit for you! Look at the modules in depth because each uni offers different modules in the same course. There may be a module in UEA which is not in UBirmingham and vice-versa. The course is the most important first and foremost imo because you are there to get an education after all!

    I am also tagging University of East Anglia to give more insight into their university and of course to show that Norwich's night life is not that bad!

    I hope this helps! Good luck
    Thank you I appreciate that! I will take a look at the modules in more depth!
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    (Original post by EstelleAntonia)
    my aim is to become a published writer....
    Then don't waste three years doing a degree in it.

    Charles Dickens didn't have a degree, nor did Shakespeare - I believe they did quite well despite this.
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    Hi EstelleAntonia,

    Congratulations on both your offers! It can be very difficult choosing between universities, but I'm hoping to persuade you that UEA is the right choice for you. I saw that you had a number of questions regarding the choice between UEA and Birmingham, so I'll hope to answer them as best as possible.

    Course structure, modules and reputation are obviously all very important to consider when making a choice. UEA's English Literature with Creative Writing has a great reputation, with a long established Creative Writing department. (You only need to look at the impressive list of Creative Writing alumni which includes writers like Emma Healey, Ian McEwan, Tracy Chevalier, Kazuo Ishiguro and many many more.) UEA is also in the UK Top 5 for Creative Writing, according to Complete University Guide 2017.



    The undergraduate course is a great way to develop your writing skills and improve your knowledge. It's also a modular course, which means you can tailor your studies to suit your interests: from classes in script-writing to poetry to gothic literature. (You can find out more about the module options here.) I myself studied Creative Writing undergraduate at UEA and had a wonderful experience, and then returned to complete the MA in Creative Writing, so I can speak for the excellent quality of the teaching!

    There's also a thriving literary scene in Norwich. Norwich became England's first UNESCO City of Literature in 2012, and there are lots of wonderful literary events including the UEA Literary Festival. There are also amazing bookshops, including the award-winning independent Book Hive. There are many many writers living in Norwich too, including Rose Tremain, Sarah Perry, Benjamin Johncock, and more, so it's a great environment for aspiring and developing authors.

    The campus of UEA is very beautiful, and the accommodation is extensive and varied, so you're sure to find something you like. Our undergraduate accommodation is among the best in the country. It was voted number one in the UK by the What Uni Student Choice Awards in 2011 and our research also shows that we have some of the best value student accommodation compared to the UK's other top 30 universities.

    Nightlife wise, there are lots of student nights in Norwich, including the Tuesday LCR nights on campus which are fancy dress and lots of fun. The next upcoming LCR is a Harry Potter themed night. There are also lots of clubs in Norwich, particularly down Prince of Wales Rd, and plenty of pubs too! (You can find out more about the nightlife here.)

    Hope that all helps, and good luck with your writing!
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    (Original post by University of East Anglia)
    Hi EstelleAntonia,

    Congratulations on both your offers! It can be very difficult choosing between universities, but I'm hoping to persuade you that UEA is the right choice for you. I saw that you had a number of questions regarding the choice between UEA and Birmingham, so I'll hope to answer them as best as possible.

    Course structure, modules and reputation are obviously all very important to consider when making a choice. UEA's English Literature with Creative Writing has a great reputation, with a long established Creative Writing department. (You only need to look at the impressive list of Creative Writing alumni which includes writers like Emma Healey, Ian McEwan, Tracy Chevalier, Kazuo Ishiguro and many many more.) UEA is also in the UK Top 5 for Creative Writing, according to Complete University Guide 2017.



    The undergraduate course is a great way to develop your writing skills and improve your knowledge. It's also a modular course, which means you can tailor your studies to suit your interests: from classes in script-writing to poetry to gothic literature. (You can find out more about the module options here.) I myself studied Creative Writing undergraduate at UEA and had a wonderful experience, and then returned to complete the MA in Creative Writing, so I can speak for the excellent quality of the teaching!

    There's also a thriving literary scene in Norwich. Norwich became England's first UNESCO City of Literature in 2012, and there are lots of wonderful literary events including the UEA Literary Festival. There are also amazing bookshops, including the award-winning independent Book Hive. There are many many writers living in Norwich too, including Rose Tremain, Sarah Perry, Benjamin Johncock, and more, so it's a great environment for aspiring and developing authors.

    The campus of UEA is very beautiful, and the accommodation is extensive and varied, so you're sure to find something you like. Our undergraduate accommodation is among the best in the country. It was voted number one in the UK by the What Uni Student Choice Awards in 2011 and our research also shows that we have some of the best value student accommodation compared to the UK's other top 30 universities.

    Nightlife wise, there are lots of student nights in Norwich, including the Tuesday LCR nights on campus which are fancy dress and lots of fun. The next upcoming LCR is a Harry Potter themed night. There are also lots of clubs in Norwich, particularly down Prince of Wales Rd, and plenty of pubs too! (You can find out more about the nightlife here.)

    Hope that all helps, and good luck with your writing!
    Thank you ever so much for your response! I have looked at the modules offered at UEA in comparison to Birmingham and found that there is much more choice at UEA, and after looking at the overview of what I will be studying, I am rather excited! There are still a few personal things to weigh up, but I'm feeling-in my head and my heart- that UEA is the place for me! It really is a beautiful city, and I can truly see myself becoming a writer there!

    Thank you very much again for taking the time to persuade me, it has definitely made difference! Good luck with your writing, too!
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    (Original post by University of East Anglia)
    which includes writers like Emma Healey, Ian McEwan, Tracy Chevalier, Kazuo Ishiguro
    Several of whom did the MA not the undergrad degree and who could probably have become published writers without going to UEA - and btw, there are a thousand UEA CW grads who disappeared without trace, which is not much of a success rate or endorsement of the course.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Several of whom did the MA not the undergrad degree and who could probably have become published writers without going to UEA - and btw, there are a thousand UEA CW grads who disappeared without trace, which is not much of a success rate or endorsement of the course.
    You speak while looking through such narrow eyes...
    There is so much more to a course than its ability to produce people who you would deem 'successful.' Undergraduates go to UEA and take this subject, quite simply because they have a passion for writing and an appreciation for literature, as do the esteemed professors who teach the course.
    Quite frankly, after over 10 years of being stuck in an education system with such little choice, I can't wait to go to a university where I can study literature while simultaneously writing my own pieces of fiction; developing myself as a writer.

    You say that graduates "disappeared without trace," but who said that their goal was to be seen or known by you? Not everybody sets out to be a published writer- some are bloggers, journalists, radio DJ's etc, there are various careers available with this degree. Plus, there are examples in all subjects of graduates moving on to do jobs unrelated to their degree- there is nothing wrong with this.

    I wonder why it is you feel the need to poke unnecessary holes in something that has such little affect on you...It might not be a subject that leads everybody into 'an obvious career area,' but a little bit of the unknown or unsuspected is part of being a writer. Oh, and if 'mainstream employers' view English Literature with Creative Writing as a 'weak subject,' then I would not be sending them my portfolio in the first instance.

    Our approaches to education and life are clearly very different, so I propose that you leave me to spend 3 years of my life enjoying myself and working hard to achieve my 'silly degree,' and I'll leave you to do... whatever it is that you do- which I'm guessing is sitting alone and giving terrible advice on student forums.
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    (Original post by EstelleAntonia)
    ......
    My comment was aimed at UEA's 'advertorial' which suggests that all you need is one of their degrees to 'be a successful writer'. The writers they have used as examples did the original postgraduate Masters course, and not the BA. This is disengeuous, misleading and probably breaks several of TSRs own rules about misrepresentation.

    I worked in publishing for over 10 years and read far too many letters and emails that started 'I have just completed a Creative Writing degree' accompanied by chunks of derivative writing with no flair, originality or potential. What they had been 'taught' on a CW degree course they could have learnt on one of the weekend courses run by Faber or the Guardian. Various Universities have realised they can get £9k a year out of gullible teens and give them a cheap-to-teach 3 year 'degree'. Too many of whom will leave University with no chance of 'being a writer'. Its a con.

    You do not need a degree in CW to be a published writer, or to work in any of the other fields you have mentioned, or simply, to write. Too many teens get sucked into the idea of a degree being a magic-bullet that will mean publishers will be queuing at their door. They won't be.
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    In defence of the UEA's response I do not really understand why ReturnMigrant has a bee in their bonnet.

    Would they complain if they did meteorology and didn't become a weather forecaster? All degrees are there to aid someone in their desired field of work, everyone knows it doesn't necessarily mean instant success, but the list of graduates mentioned in the above post is impressive. We all know you can fall on your feet if you're lucky enough with other routes.

    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    My comment was aimed at UEA's 'advertorial' which suggests that all you need is one of their degrees to 'be a successful writer'
    If it 'suggests' it is how you have inferred the post. It does not state.

    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    The writers they have used as examples did the original postgraduate Masters course, and not the BA. This is disengeuous, misleading and probably breaks several of TSRs own rules about misrepresentation.
    Nowhere does it say they did the BA. It says they are graduates of the Creative Writing department. I fear it is you who is being misleading.

    As you mention in your other posts on the forum Return Migrant, "If you dont like the course, it wont matter what the accommodation or the local pub is like, it'll be a tough 3 years." The original poster has decided what will make them the happiest. Perhaps accept that and move on?
 
 
 
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