valdokarina
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Which one has more prospects job wise?
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neither

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kettering_98
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(Original post by ayyy2)
neither

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To be fair, OP, neither of those are necessarily renowned for their career prospects, being non-vocational arts degrees. This isn't to say you'll be unemployed if you do an arts degree - but bear it in mind that you need to pick something that caters to your strengths and interests, as you'll want a 2:1 at least; and furthermore, the uni you go to will be important too.

You'll need work experience in an area you're interested in: for example, do you like the idea of journalism? Museum work? Politics, law, HR, management? What do you want to do with your life? A friend of mine wants to be a curator, hence, she chose History. I chose History because I like it, am fairly good at it, and don't know what to do. That sense of indecision is common with arts students - we're told about 'transferable skills', after all. I've now decided that I want to do medicine after uni - which isn't impossible with a History degree, but it does limit me significantly.

So, think about what you want to do, and how you're going to do it. If you're unsure, I'd be inclined to advise you to take a gap year. If you just want a generic 'graduate' job, and you just want to go to uni, I'd say do the above, and just pick the subject you like the most.
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(Original post by kettering_98)
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To be fair, OP, neither of those are necessarily renowned for their career prospects, being non-vocational arts degrees. This isn't to say you'll be unemployed if you do an arts degree - but bear it in mind that you need to pick something that caters to your strengths and interests, as you'll want a 2:1 at least; and furthermore, the uni you go to will be important too.

You'll need work experience in an area you're interested in: for example, do you like the idea of journalism? Museum work? Politics, law, HR, management? What do you want to do with your life? A friend of mine wants to be a curator, hence, she chose History. I chose History because I like it, am fairly good at it, and don't know what to do. That sense of indecision is common with arts students - we're told about 'transferable skills', after all. I've now decided that I want to do medicine after uni - which isn't impossible with a History degree, but it does limit me significantly.

So, think about what you want to do, and how you're going to do it. If you're unsure, I'd be inclined to advise you to take a gap year. If you just want a generic 'graduate' job, and you just want to go to uni, I'd say do the above, and just pick the subject you like the most.
Sadly I was better at english I didnt pick it for a levels (I know stupid) but I enjoy history more and currently do it so thats ok, I'm interested in either teaching or journalism so hopefully that will be possible with a history degree HOWEVER, you are actually the person I need to speak to if you dont mind me asking a couple of questions. I might want to be a vet or go into medicine and thats why I also regret not picking biology or chemistry (I got As for science at GCSE) and I looked into it and thought it was as impossible to get into it again, so how will it be possible, I'm really interested since you did a history degree and want to go into that and I may possibly do the same
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(Original post by valdokarina)
Sadly I was better at english I didnt pick it for a levels (I know stupid) but I enjoy history more and currently do it so thats ok, I'm interested in either teaching or journalism so hopefully that will be possible with a history degree HOWEVER, you are actually the person I need yo so
Both of those careers are definitely possible with a History degree bonus if you enjoy it more! Best of luck with your application - feel free to PM me if you need any advice regarding your PS etc.
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valdokarina
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(Original post by kettering_98)
Both of those careers are definitely possible with a History degree bonus if you enjoy it more! Best of luck with your application - feel free to PM me if you need any advice regarding your PS etc.
Sorry I edited my last questions asking you something else as it sent without me finishing, do you mine having a look please I would appricate it
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(Original post by valdokarina)
Sorry I edited my last questions asking you something else as it sent without me finishing, do you mine having a look please I would appricate it

Ah, no problem!

Yeah, so, I'm actually a first year History student. I took Chemistry for AS, but sadly got an E (I was predicted an A/B, but to be honest, there are a number of things I should have done to prevent my poor score; hindsight, ey); and I took Biology for A2, and got a C. Again, I was predicted an A, but failed one paper. I looked at these results and thought that I could never be cut out to be a doctor - surely doctors are geniuses at science? Well, not necessarily the case...I've a medic friend whose natural talents lay in the humanities and languages, and she had to work her arse off to get A*A in Biology and Chemistry at A2; she worked far harder than I ever did. This made me realise that I'm not necessarily *stupid*, I just didn't work hard enough, and I didn't address the problems I had at the time (I was struggling with anxiety/depression).

So, when I realised that medicine wasn't over forever, I looked to what I could do with an arts degree. It turns out that a few universities do accept arts students: Warwick, Newcastle, St. George's, and Nottingham come to mind. For the former three, you need a 2:1 in any degree, as well as relevant work experience, and a good UKCAT score; for Notts, I think you can get in with a 2:2. I believe there's information on this site regarding what each uni wants from its applicants - but it's a good idea to email the university directly with any questions you may have, as their requirements may differ year-by-year.

What are you predicted, if you don't mind me asking? I think Manchester, and maybe some other unis, offer foundation programmes for students who get AAA+ in non-science subjects. However, I'm not entirely sure, as I haven't really looked into this (I took a science, so I wasn't eligible).

Nevertheless, if you think you'd honestly want to do med, I'd recommend asking a teacher/adviser at school - do you have a teacher who overlooks applications? They may be a good source of info.

But if you really can't decide, don't go to uni straight away: get work experience. A local magazine, a school, a hospital, a care home - do them all, and see what you'd like the most. Then you may have a clearer path: say you want to go for GEM with a humanities degree. They like work experience, so you'll have to get sorted ASAP.

Hope this has been of at least some help
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(Original post by kettering_98)
Ah, no problem!

Yeah, so, I'm actually a first year History student. I took Chemistry for AS, but sadly got an E (I was predicted an A/B, but to be honest, there are a number of things I should have done to prevent my poor score; hindsight, ey); and I took Biology for A2, and got a C. Again, I was predicted an A, but failed one paper. I looked at these results and thought that I could never be cut out to be a doctor - surely doctors are geniuses at science? Well, not necessarily the case...I've a medic friend whose natural talents lay in the humanities and languages, and she had to work her arse off to get A*A in Biology and Chemistry at A2; she worked far harder than I ever did. This made me realise that I'm not necessarily *stupid*, I just didn't work hard enough, and I didn't address the problems I had at the time (I was struggling with anxiety/depression).

So, when I realised that medicine wasn't over forever, I looked to what I could do with an arts degree. It turns out that a few universities do accept arts students: Warwick, Newcastle, St. George's, and Nottingham come to mind. For the former three, you need a 2:1 in any degree, as well as relevant work experience, and a good UKCAT score; for Notts, I think you can get in with a 2:2. I believe there's information on this site regarding what each uni wants from its applicants - but it's a good idea to email the university directly with any questions you may have, as their requirements may differ year-by-year.

What are you predicted, if you don't mind me asking? I think Manchester, and maybe some other unis, offer foundation programmes for students who get AAA+ in non-science subjects. However, I'm not entirely sure, as I haven't really looked into this (I took a science, so I wasn't eligible).

Nevertheless, if you think you'd honestly want to do med, I'd recommend asking a teacher/adviser at school - do you have a teacher who overlooks applications? They may be a good source of info.

But if you really can't decide, don't go to uni straight away: get work experience. A local magazine, a school, a hospital, a care home - do them all, and see what you'd like the most. Then you may have a clearer path: say you want to go for GEM with a humanities degree. They like work experience, so you'll have to get sorted ASAP.

Hope this has been of at least some help
You have helped a lot thank youuu!!! Good luck with what you decide to do in the future I got 11 A*-As for gcses however, my school does predictions differently so I'm not sure, but maybe my gcse results tell you the kind of grades I get. I think its a good idea to do work experience and stuff but I'm not keen on taking a gap year so I might have to do that over the summer (I'm in year 12 btw)

If you dont mind me asking (again hahaha) where do you study and do you enjoy your history degree??
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(Original post by valdokarina)
You have helped a lot thank youuu!!! Good luck with what you decide to do in the future I got 11 A*-As for gcses however, my school does predictions differently so I'm not sure, but maybe my gcse results tell you the kind of grades I get. I think its a good idea to do work experience and stuff but I'm not keen on taking a gap year so I might have to do that over the summer (I'm in year 12 btw)

If you dont mind me asking (again hahaha) where do you study and do you enjoy your history degree??
Thanks, same to you!

Right, well - I'm not sure how it's done now, as I left when your AS results counted towards your final grade. As far as I'm aware, this is no longer the case. But yeah, ask your teachers.

Lol, it's fine. I'm at York, and I do enjoy it the contact hours are different to sixth form, so I do find myself doing nothing quite a lot.
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(Original post by kettering_98)
Thanks, same to you!

Right, well - I'm not sure how it's done now, as I left when your AS results counted towards your final grade. As far as I'm aware, this is no longer the case. But yeah, ask your teachers.

Lol, it's fine. I'm at York, and I do enjoy it the contact hours are different to sixth form, so I do find myself doing nothing quite a lot.
Yeah our exams are linear now and thats great, how are you examined?

And I'm getting a lot of people telling me I cant go into journalism with a history degree as it doesnt teach things like short hand and thats was employers want, so I'm very conflicted right now hahaha
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(Original post by valdokarina)
Yeah our exams are linear now and thats great, how are you examined?

And I'm getting a lot of people telling me I cant go into journalism with a history degree as it doesnt teach things like short hand and thats was employers want, so I'm very conflicted right now hahaha
You can take a journalism degree as a postgraduate. Many if not most journalists go down this route.

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(Original post by ageshallnot)
You can take a journalism degree as a postgraduate. Many if not most journalists go down this route.

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Would it be possible without doing a postgraduate but doing work experience to do with journalism?
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(Original post by valdokarina)
Would it be possible without doing a postgraduate but doing work experience to do with journalism?
Possibly but doing both would be better.

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