VioletPhillippo
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Hi,

I've just been doing a question about medical tracers.

a. Are gamma rays the most suitable as they are the most penetrating so can therefore pass through the skin and be detected outside of the body?

b. I'm not sure about this one, why wouldn't the corrected background rate need to be calculated?

e. One reason could be that the patient will only have a radioactive substance in their body for a short time which limits the damage that the radiation will cause to healthy cells. I can't think of a 2nd reason.

Any help would be really appreciated.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by VioletPhillippo)
Hi,

I've just been doing a question about medical tracers.

a. Are gamma rays the most suitable as they are the most penetrating so can therefore pass through the skin and be detected outside of the body?

b. I'm not sure about this one, why wouldn't the corrected background rate need to be calculated?

e. One reason could be that the patient will only have a radioactive substance in their body for a short time which limits the damage that the radiation will cause to healthy cells. I can't think of a 2nd reason.

Any help would be really appreciated.
a) Also: Gamma rays are relatively low ionisers and so have less cell damaging potential than beta radiation.

b) The background rate is needed to calculate the actual localised gamma emitter rate in order to determine true concentration at the cancer site.

e) Also: They are simultaneously good penetrators, so can be detected more easily through body tissue. The element producing the gamma radiation has a half life long enough to enable detection but short enough to avoid unnecessary exposure to the patient.
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VioletPhillippo
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(Original post by uberteknik)
a) Also: Gamma rays are relatively low ionisers and so have less cell damaging potential than beta radiation.

b) The background rate is needed to calculate the actual localised gamma emitter rate in order to determine true concentration at the cancer site.

e) Also: They are simultaneously good penetrators, so can be detected more easily through body tissue. The element producing the gamma radiation has a half life long enough to enable detection but short enough to avoid unnecessary exposure to the patient.
Thanks so much. The only thing I'm still not sure about is that the questions asks why it is unecessary to calculate a corrected count rate, I can't think of a reason.
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