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Law with French Law (LLB)

Hey,

I was just scanning through some fancy uni prosectus and saw these very very fancy degrees, so I was wondering for example, for KCL what would the french language requirement be if you wanted to study Law with French Law, I mean do you have to be some sort of genius in French? For example, for my A-level i should have about 85%, but I plan on resitting this one in order to bring it above 90. Any comments? anyone doing this degree? Do you think it's quite good (Bad?).

THaaaaaaaaaaaaaanks in advance :wink:

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Reply 1
Kiril
Hey,

I was just scanning through some fancy uni prosectus and saw these very very fancy degrees, so I was wondering for example, for KCL what would the french language requirement be if you wanted to study Law with French Law, I mean do you have to be some sort of genius in French? For example, for my A-level i should have about 85%, but I plan on resitting this one in order to bring it above 90. Any comments? anyone doing this degree? Do you think it's quite good (Bad?).

THaaaaaaaaaaaaaanks in advance :wink:


You usually need an A at a-level in the appropriate language for these combined degrees and sometimes they conduct the whole interview in the relevant language.
Hey, my friend has applied to do just that course at Manchester.
I'll get her to give u some info when she gets back from holiday.

Diamond.

(Oh yea, from what I remember she had to get an A at As level French to even get a look in, and she did, but as she was borderline she retook some modules. I think for most of them you need to have an A in French, as half the course is in the language. But she did have an advantage cos she did Portugese outside from school, and is supposed to be heading for an A in that too. I think the average grades required is AAB, and she did 4 A2's so shes not too bad I guess. But i'll still get her to help you).
Reply 3
BlAcK dIaMoNd
Hey, my friend has applied to do just that course at Manchester.
I'll get her to give u some info when she gets back from holiday.

Diamond.

(Oh yea, from what I remember she had to get an A at As level French to even get a look in, and she did, but as she was borderline she retook some modules. I think for most of them you need to have an A in French, as half the course is in the language. But she did have an advantage cos she did Portugese outside from school, and is supposed to be heading for an A in that too. I think the average grades required is AAB, and she did 4 A2's so shes not too bad I guess. But i'll still get her to help you).


I would very much appreciate that, thanks.
I'm on the Oxford Law and Law Studies Europe (French) course. In my experience, having applied to a few unis for similar courses is that you need an A at A level French but not really anything more. The exceptions being 'double maîtrise' courses such as Cambrdige where your French needs to be better as you do two years in France and only two in England. Meaning you're French skills are needed more, (but you have less time to study English law as a result).
Reply 5
Yes certainly the A-level of the relevent language has to be with a grade A. But how high A does it have to be? Obviously not all A-grade students are on the same level of competence. And did you have a conversation in French for your interview?

Thanks.
Kiril
Yes certainly the A-level of the relevent language has to be with a grade A. But how high A does it have to be? Obviously not all A-grade students are on the same level of competence. And did you have a conversation in French for your interview?

Thanks.


It has to be an A, it will be predicted at the time you are either rejected or accepted and your required grade will be any A not a certain UMS score.

Oxford was the only place I applied which interviewed me and the French part was five minute chat about my family and where I went for holiday (GCSE oral style). Warwick just accepted me and Nottingham gave me the standard test they ask all law students to take, (although strangely had already made me an offer for straight law without a test). Cardiff accepted me straight off.

I don't really know how the Universities choose people for these courses, particularly considering the high demand for them. I can only presume that they require a certain level of competence for French and then pick the candidates on how good they will be at law.

Feel free to PM me if you want.
Reply 7
I'm going to be studying for the Double Maîtrise course at King's College, London starting this September. On the Open Day the prospective students for this course were told that indeed a high level of French is required - certainly A at A Level or equivalent, but most of the students on the course were by no means incredibly fluent, they just worked hard at the language side of the course as well as the Law. At KCL I think extra classes in French are offered to the English speaking students and all the French Law classes in London are taught in French. They also take into account everyone's different circumstances - say for example one student's mother is French whereas the next has never been to France before - obviously they would be expecting a higher degree of fluency from the first and would take everyone's individual circumstances into account.

I am good at French, I got an A in my Advanced Higher, but I am no means perfect. However, I'll be working my hardest to achieve the best possible French I can when I am in London and supplementing that with work experience in France and trips over there whenever I can. It's going to be a very difficult course to do - but well worth it - the consequences of completion of this course look very good indeed for the students.

I and legalbeagle (who is waiting on results at the moment, but I'm sure will achieve well!) and Liam52 on these boards should all be studying Law and French Law at KCL, the LSE and UCL respectively in the Autumn, so if you have any questions, just post and I'm sure someone will be able to answer.
Reply 8
That is a great degree indeed. I was actually fascinated by it in the KCL's prospectus. I know there is no interview for KCL but there is one for UCL's course, would you consider that interview as very hard?
Reply 9
As Ecossaise mentioned, I am hopefully going to be studying law with french law at UCL this September (depending on results later today!).

I certainly wouldn't say that the french part of the interview was difficult - v french GCSE stylee. However, despite this, they ask for an A at A2 french for a very good reason, and I wouldn't like to embark upon the course unless you were reasonably comfortable in the hope of achieving this A grade.

I say all this without even knowing if I've achieved the grades for my offer myself yet, nevertheless..

Anyways, best of luck and certainly dnt over stress about the interview in french, if you enjoy the language and perform well at AS, you certainly won't find any part of the interview daunting or beyond your ability.

PM me if you have any further questions!
Reply 10
Fingers crossed for the prospective French law students!
Reply 11
I just got my res for A2 french (I will be doing another yr in 6th form) and I got 501/600 which makes a good A. I also have AB in ICT, B in AS Maths and B in Accounting. Do you all reckon I will have a good chance of getting an offer if I applied for entry in 2005? (Suppose I should get A in Maths and Accounting and I also consider getting an aditional AS-level)

I'd appreciate any response.
Reply 12
ecossaise
I'm going to be studying for the Double Maîtrise course at King's College, London starting this September. On the Open Day the prospective students for this course were told that indeed a high level of French is required - certainly A at A Level or equivalent, but most of the students on the course were by no means incredibly fluent, they just worked hard at the language side of the course as well as the Law. At KCL I think extra classes in French are offered to the English speaking students and all the French Law classes in London are taught in French. They also take into account everyone's different circumstances - say for example one student's mother is French whereas the next has never been to France before - obviously they would be expecting a higher degree of fluency from the first and would take everyone's individual circumstances into account.

I am good at French, I got an A in my Advanced Higher, but I am no means perfect. However, I'll be working my hardest to achieve the best possible French I can when I am in London and supplementing that with work experience in France and trips over there whenever I can. It's going to be a very difficult course to do - but well worth it - the consequences of completion of this course look very good indeed for the students.

I and legalbeagle (who is waiting on results at the moment, but I'm sure will achieve well!) and Liam52 on these boards should all be studying Law and French Law at KCL, the LSE and UCL respectively in the Autumn, so if you have any questions, just post and I'm sure someone will be able to answer.


Hi Ecossaise, And The Others,
First, I'd like to apologize for all the errors I will certainly do in english with my "post" !
Well, here I go ! I'm french, and I'm only 16 but I already know what I wanna do in the future ( which is not that far, so...), I'd really love to study English and French Law ! and guess what ! I found out something corresponding to my whiches: The "Double Maîtrise" in Cambridge ! You also must know in France we have 3 years at High School and I'm in my second year ( première de Lycée ), as an outcome I still have one more year at High School ( terminale de Lycée ) and at the end of this year I'm gonna take the french exam called BAC to go to university ! so I start to get infos about the "double maîtrise" ! How is it ? How do we get in there ? Where do we live during the 2 years in England ? Is there another University I could integrate to study English and French Law ? Could you tell me everything you know about this program or another one? Or, do you know someone that could help me ? Could you tell me if I will get any problem with my english by checkin' up my "post", please 'cuz it's really important too ?! I really wanna come to England (and maybe live there in the future) ! My fisrt target being going to Cambridge or somewhere else where I will be able to study English Law and I will work as hard as it's possible for it !

Here's my e-mail : [email protected]

Thanks in advance, I need all your advises !!!
Liam16
Hi Ecossaise, And The Others,
First, I'd like to apologize for all the errors I will certainly do in english with my "post" !
Well, here I go ! I'm french, and I'm only 16 but I already know what I wanna do in the future ( which is not that far, so...), I'd really love to study English and French Law ! and guess what ! I found out something corresponding to my whiches: The "Double Maîtrise" in Cambridge ! You also must know in France we have 3 years at High School and I'm in my second year ( première de Lycée ), as an outcome I still have one more year at High School ( terminale de Lycée ) and at the end of this year I'm gonna take the french exam called BAC to go to university ! so I start to get infos about the "double maîtrise" ! How is it ? How do we get in there ? Where do we live during the 2 years in England ? Is there another University I could integrate to study English and French Law ? Could you tell me everything you know about this program or another one? Or, do you know someone that could help me ? Could you tell me if I will get any problem with my english by checkin' up my "post", please 'cuz it's really important too ?! I really wanna come to England (and maybe live there in the future) ! My fisrt target being going to Cambridge or somewhere else where I will be able to study English Law and I will work as hard as it's possible for it !

Here's my e-mail : [email protected]

Thanks in advance, I need all your advises !!!


The Cambridge website is here: www.cam.ac.uk
It pretty much covers all your questions. There's an exam you can do to prove your English is good enough, that'll be detailed on there as well, but remember that it's very, very competitive to get into Cambridge - just a thought, but they might prefer you to have studied law in France before you go there.
Reply 14
Dr. Blazed
The Cambridge website is here: www.cam.ac.uk
It pretty much covers all your questions.

LOL!!



Liam16
Is there another University I could integrate to study English and French Law

Hi Liam your English is very good, below is a website link to the law department of University College London (UCL). UCL is one of the finest universities in Britain, offers the course you are looking and is located in the middle of one of the worlds most vibrant and exciting cities (what more could you ask for?).

Click below for information:
LLB and Maîtrise at UCL


.
Reply 15
Hi Liam,

French students applying to do the Double Maîtrise course have to apply through the corresponding French university. For the course at Cambridge that would be Paris II - Panthéon-Assas and for King's College, London and University College, London that would be Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne. The selection process at Cambridge is extremely tough - especially more so for French students, but it is always worth a try.

Here are the websites - http://www.univ-paris1.fr/ and http://www.u-paris2.fr/

There are also websites for the Double Maîtrise associations set up by the students studying for this course - the Double Maîtrise association at Cambridge University is http://www.doublemaitrise.com and at King's College it is http://www.ajpk.org.uk

I hope this helps you some more.

P.S. (I think your English is better than many of the natives!)
you should be close to bilingual.
Reply 17
Hi there!

If you need some help about your skills in french, or about french law, do not hesitate to contact me. I'm a postgraduate in France, and my specialisation is in commercial law and contract law, or any other subkect I studied.I'm living in London, and would pleased to give you some advices or help you to practice your french!!!
Reply 18
Prys
Hi there!

If you need some help about your skills in french, or about french law, do not hesitate to contact me. I'm a postgraduate in France, and my specialisation is in commercial law and contract law, or any other subkect I studied.I'm living in London, and would pleased to give you some advices or help you to practice your french!!!



How useful is a European Law Degree{English Law plus French Law} from an employers perspective?
Reply 19
As I was explained, and that is why I'm going to do a LLM in England, the interest is that many big firms (in Uk, USA...) have offices in France, or contract with french firms. Having an english sollicitor or councellor (is that the right word?) is useful for french sollicitors offices as they know deeply the law appliable. And the good point for english people is that very few french people know english law, and speak a good english!
Of course, most of the time it will be only in Paris as the biggest firms have their registered office there.