S23 - Statement of Intent from the Secretary of State for Education Watch

This discussion is closed.
adam9317
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Statement of Intent from the Secretary of State for Education









Statement of Intent
Secretary of State: Rt. Hon Quamquam123





The government is committed to a modern approach to education. We firmly believe that education should not just be about learning facts, developing a few social skills and getting pupils ready for higher education but about preparing people for the real world. The government is keen to develop a 21st century curriculum that works for students and teachers alike, and to eliminate the age-old attitude of students across the country that school is a bind by diversifying school life, creating up-to-date facilities and reducing certain causes of stress.

Extending the School Day with Extracurricular Provision
At the moment, the school system has a tendency to get students to focus on academic studies, revisions and exams. Although these aspects are vitally important to people’s education, in some schools they can sometimes dominate school life. Combined with a lack of funding for activities outside the classroom, this can result in some pupils not having a chance to try out skills they otherwise would not have experienced before. Because of this problem, the Department for Education will provide a unified fund of £10,000 for each school and schools can request funds from that pot. This will give all schoolchildren an opportunity to take part in drama, music, dance, chess, art and other recreational pursuits. We recognise that school is more than just passing exams and that in turn, more access to activities could even improve students’ performance in their studies. In addition to this, participation in co-curricular sessions have the potential to boost pupils’ self-confidence, give them greater opportunities later in life, give them a sense of responsibility, develop specialised skills and improve their overall attitude.

In order to ensure that the increased activities will not reduce lesson time and that they will not just act as a token effort, the Government will initiate a trial in which schools in carefully local authorities will choose three days of the school week where the school day will finish an hour later. In this extra hour at the end of the day, the extracurricular activities mentioned above will take place. The main reason why they will take place at the end of the day rather than another time is because studies show that as the day goes by, most students tend to lose concentration so at this time, they would be better suited to non-academic sessions which do not require intense concentration. If the trial is a success, it will be rolled out to the rest of the country.

A Renewed Focus on Sports Programmes and Managed Gyms
Similarly, students should also have greater access to decent sports programmes. At the moment, many schools do not offer pupils a choice of sports and the programmes that they do offer them can be poorly thought through and not taken seriously enough. In each term, schools will be forced to offer boys and girls a minimum of 2 sports choices respectively but will be encouraged to offer more. There will also be more opportunities for students to take part in more indivudal sports such as tennis, athletics and swimming. Pupils should not be forced into participating in a sporting activity that they detest but sport is an important part of schooling. It can bring with it several advantages including better teamwork, more patience, the art of persistence, greater fitness, leadership skills and a positive effect on academic studies. It can be difficult at times for schools to fit sports into the curriculum when they are under pressure to achieve good academic results but the diverse atmosphere that sports can bring must not be undervalued. We will create a mechanism for schools to apply directly to the Department for Education for special grants, specifically for the provision of sporting activities. We will also trial million pound 'managed gyms' in 50 schools around the country. These gyms will be located on school land and pupils can use them but members of the public can too, but they have to pay as though it were a normal gym. This in turn will generate a small profit and we expect neutral running costs within 3 months. This will also strengthen the position of schools as centres of their respective communties. In England, 39% of all sports facilities are located on educational sites. We want to see broadened public access.

Information Technology for the Workplace
Although the current ICT curriculum is sufficient and a useful part of the curriculum, it simply does not cover enough material. In the last decade, we have witnessed a technological boom with the introduction of smartphones, tablets, electronic watches, electronic headgear and most significantly of all, a large development in software. You would be hard pressed to find a company now that does not use software in some form or another and it is crucial that every student knows every single basic skill. We would particularly like to see a greater teaching focus that teaches pupils how to touch-type, use Microsoft Office, use Google Drive, use spreadsheets, use databases, create a website, use social media in beneficial ways, use certain messaging platforms and continue the push from last term regarding coding. Also, students should be given certain projects to carry out, during their ICT lessons, that test their initiative and the skills they have learn so far. These projects could range from marketing a fictional product online to creating a website for a charity. In order to accommodate for this expansion of the curriculum, schools will be expected to teach pupils an extra hour of ICT a week up to GCSE level. In order to test and certify the knowledge that everyone will have obtained, all students will take the European Computer Driving License tests in Year 9, a globally recognised qualification.

Upgrading PSHE Programmes and Introducing Life Skills Days
PSHE is viewed as a bind by a large proportion of students but the concept is very important. Even if pupils already know about the dangers they could face both inside and outside of school, PSHE should reinforce their understanding in an engaging but serious manner. Some schools already pride themselves for their teaching on PSHE but all schools need to do the same. All schools will now be required to either have a weekly slot for PSHE or a dedicated day for it every term. The PSHE sessions will either be run by teachers or charities coming into the schools to talk. All primary school PSHE programmes must contain the topics of bullying (including cyberbullying) and healthy eating but schools will be given a choice of what else to include. All secondary school PSHE programmes must contain the topics of bullying (including cyberbullying), depression, anorexia, drugs, smoking, sex and relationships, gender and sexuality, jobs, and finance (which will be split into several different topics which, among others, will include: including mortgages, bills, credit cards, pay checks and taxes. Although the students may find some of the themes in their PSHE sessions patronising, they are all serious matters which they need to learn about.

We appreciate the last government’s good work in increasing the amount of first aid sessions but we feel that life skills should be more than just that. Therefore, at Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 levels, all schools will give pupils a dedicated day each term in which they will learn a variety of life skills including cooking, ironing, budgeting and common household repairs. When the pupils eventually go to university and into the world beyond, they will need to learn how to look after themselves without constant assistance from their parents. By instilling these skills early, they will be much more prepared when the time comes to put them into practise. Furthermore, as they would be taking a day off lessons to learn these skills, they should enjoy learning them more than if they learnt them in their free time at home.

A Different Approach to Assessment
Partly due to the exam reforms that are taking place, both public and internal exams are much more focused on memory retention. For many subjects at the moment, particularly before GCSE level, students are required to memorise hundreds of dates, foreign words, scientific processes, mathematical equations, geographical landforms and so forth, but as soon as the exams are over, they can forget them. We believe that exams should encourage students more instead to think of their feet. Here is an example: in a Chemistry exam, instead of asking a candidate to list the 4 stages of a hydrolysis reaction, give them a list of chemicals and apparatus to get them to propose an experiment that would chemically break down a compound. This reduction of prompts could be rolled out to other subjects too. The reason behind this is to prevent students from mindlessly learning facts so they can simply transfer them to a page on the day of an exam but to engage them with their subjects more and deploy some critical thinking.

The length of some exams, in particular essay based ones, will be lengthened. Extreme time constraints and students being pushed for time are common for many exams. However, such time pressures can make exams more of a test of writing speed than a display of knowledge and expertise in the particular subject. By extending certain exams by just 20 minutes, candidates will be able to answer exams to the best of their ability, without having to constantly worry about the time.

Another Look at Selective Education
On average, wealthier children are more likely to receive a place at grammar schools as their parents may pay for tutoring. This may not always be the case but pupils at selective schools are five times more likely to come from independent prep schools than from disadvantaged backgrounds. We recognise the good results that grammar schools achieve but across the board, they lead to a widening in the equality gap and can sting poorer students. Also, the pressure on children to get a grammar school place at such a young age is not always healthy and can sometimes lead to psychological problems.

Instead of grammar schools in their current form, we would like to give selected sixth form colleges 'grammar school' status. These selective schools would choose their students based purely on their GCSE results; they would select based purely on how hardworking a student is. These schools would bring with them all the benefits of grammar schools such as strong exam results but not the bad aspects such as the 11+ exams and the favouring of wealthy children.

Raising the Compulsory School Age
Under the current system, English schoolchildren have to go to school by the age of four. In 2012, the University of Cambridge published a report in which they found that forcing children to go to school too early could have detrimental effects later in their schooling careers such as a lack of motivation for their studies and a higher chance of developing mental health conditions. Instead, it is much more beneficial for children to engage in what is known as ‘social play’ up until the age of five. Studies in New Zealand have also shown that getting children to go to lessons early does not improve their development and may be damaging. Also, raising the compulsory school age by a year would save the department a staggering £8.7bn.

Reforming Homework
The government will release guidelines as part of the updated national curriculum asking schools to reassess their approach to homework as a teaching tool. We believe that students at A level should be given more free rein over their homework. It is becoming increasingly common for teachers to give pupils worksheets and textbook exercises to complete for their homework. Homework is designed to be a way of consolidation but individual students have their own ways of doing this. If they find it more effective to do this by other methods such as reading or making flashcards, then they should not be forced to carry out tasks that won’t be beneficial to them. At the moment, they may rush this work to get it out of the way but if they do not take in what they are doing, there is no point in them doing it in the first place. Some students may use this extra freedom as an opportunity to become lax in their studies but at A Level, pupils need to take responsibility for their own learning. Also, they need to be more prepared for university where they will have to devise their own consolidation strategies. Reducing the levels of compulsory homework will alleviate the stress on teachers and pupils alike, and will in the long-term will improve exam performance.

Reintroducing Maintenance Grants
The abolition of maintenance grants for the poorest young people could deter some people from the most disadvantaged backgrounds from going to university. In previous decades, maintenance grants have played a key role in supporting deprived students, in particular with their living costs. However, the average student now has to spend an average of just over £12,000 on living costs, and with tuition fees set to rise once again, the cost of going to university for some young people is becoming increasingly daunting.

Building a National Education Service
The government believes that universal access to a high quality education not only empowers and enriches the individual, but is of tremendous importance to the future success and prosperity of our country. For this reason, the government will lay the foundations for a National Education Service as part of our goal to create a high-skill, high-wage economy. Although the government deems it to be fiscally imprudent to abolish all university tuition fees, the government will commit to making all courses at the Open University free as well as introducing a wider range of available courses and increasing the instructions funding to allow for a greater intake of pupils. This includes the building of 25 new specialist colleges. We believe the future of tertiary education is long-distance learning throughout one's life and we hope to see many more people building on the skills they already as part of a more dynamic workforce. In the information economy people will have the freedom to study at times that suits their lifestyles whether it be to improve their career prospects or for pleasure.

Responding to VM414
Following the passing of the Student Finance Parental Contributions Expectations Motion, we have decided to make it compulsory for all Student Loans Companies to state how much money they believe the parents in each case should contribute to their child’s finances. From now on, in their entitlement letter, they will have to explain that the total amount that SLC expect parents to contribute is the difference between the maximum loan a student could get based on no parental income, and the amount they are entitled to. That way, students will have some evidence to show their parents that they will require extra financial support. If more parents subsidise more financially, there will be less unnecessary stress for the student in question.

Education Reform in Wales
The Department for Education is keen to devolve powers concerning education in Wales to the National Assembly for Wales. This is because of the confusion that arises related to determining what legislation is canon and what is not. Therefore, we will aim to repeal Section 1 from the 2015 Education Reform Act, which will allow the National Assembly for Wales to determine how their own education system is run and what their teachers shall be paid. It is worth noting that the sections about bilingual schools and pupils' freedom to speak in the language of their choice will not affected.


Costings:
Spoiler:
Show









Extracurriciular activites: £10,000 x 4040 = £40.4m (per annum)
More money spent on sports: £50m(one off) and a £20m annual fund
Financial support for parents for higher compulsory school age: £1100 x 386810 = £425m(per annum)
Reintroducing maintenance grants: £5.2bn(per annum)
Making Open University courses free: £229.1m (per annum)
Building new National Education Colleges: £160m (one off)
Savings from raising compulsory school age: 22,500 x 386810 = £8.7bn (per annum)

One Off Cost: £160m + £50m = £210m
Yearly Cost/Saving: (£40.4m + £20m + £425m + £5200m + £229.1m) - £8700m = -£2.7855bn







Sources:
Spoiler:
Show








Number of schools in England: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...nts-in-england
Number of schools in Scotland: http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistic...contactdetails
Number of schools in Wales: http://gov.wales/docs/statistics/201...ts-2016-en.pdf
Number of schools in Northern Ireland: https://www.education-ni.gov.uk/site...02015%2016.pdf
Number of school pupils by age: https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...al_Tables.xlsx
On the amount of sports facilities controlled by schools: https://www.sportengland.org/our-wor...ts-facilities/
Report by the University of Cambridge regarding school starting age: http://www.importanceofplay.eu/IMG/p...ce_of_play.pdf
Cost of reintroducing maintenance grants: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-10380717.html
Cost of National Education Service: http://www.open.ac.uk/foi/main/sites...015_16_pdf.pdf (pg.59) https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g...ce-of-tomorrow







1
Saracen's Fez
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
adam9317
This needs a number.
0
Connor27
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
An SoI that I have little to no qualms with, my only gripe is the national education service.

I like raising the starting age to 5 for cost saving purposes; the sixth form college grammars is really clever and I also like the ideas for exam reforms.

All in all, a very good, sensible SoI, well done Quamquam123!
0
Quamquam123
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Connor27)
An SoI that I have little to no qualms with, my only gripe is the national education service.

I like raising the starting age to 5 for cost saving purposes; the sixth form college grammars is really clever and I also like the ideas for exam reforms.

All in all, a very good, sensible SoI, well done Quamquam123!
Thank you
0
TheDefiniteArticle
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
A really solid, progressive look at education in the country. Aye.
0
RayApparently
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
"Our top priority was, is and always will be education, education, education."


On education, the government has demonstrated its commitment to a pragmatic radicalism. Education liberates an individual and strengthens a society. Spearheaded by my party's indispensable Chair and visionary Secretary of State Quamquam123 - this SOI is the product of a great deal of internal debate, discussion and collaboration. I thank him for his hard work.
0
Connor27
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by RayApparently)
"Our top priority was, is and always will be education, education, education."


On education, the government has demonstrated its commitment to a pragmatic radicalism. Education liberates an individual and strengthens a society. Spearheaded by my party's indispensable Chair and visionary Secretary of State Quamquam123 - this SOI is the product of a great deal of internal debate, discussion and collaboration. I thank him for his hard work.
We can make a Blair of you yet, what did I tell you all those weeks ago!
0
username2808800
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
Except that students can already switch to grammar sixth forms at present. I see no need to change the current system.
So you are proposing to make all grammars comprehensive up until year 12?
The wealthy simply will go to private schools and the few middle class and poor that had a chance at attending opportunity will be taking away.
But for grammar schools , if you get rid of them only the poor and middle class loose out. The rich still get private education and leave everybody trailing behind .
The point is grammar sixth forms already exist and I see no need to change and reforms schools across England.
CoffeeGeek's social mobility came to a perfect response by introducing quotas.

I shall allow our shadow education secretary to comment before I vote on this
Other than that I have no problems.
0
Aph
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by fleky6910)
Except that students can already switch to grammar sixth forms at present. I see no need to change the current system.
So you are proposing to make all grammars comprehensive up until year 12?
The wealthy simply will go to private schools and the few middle class and poor that had a chance at attending opportunity will be taking away.
But for grammar schools , if you get rid of them only the poor and middle class loose out. The rich still get private education and leave everybody trailing behind .
The point is grammar sixth forms already exist and I see no need to change and reforms schools across England.
CoffeeGeek's social mobility came to a perfect response by introducing quotas.

I shall allow our shadow education secretary to comment before I vote on this
Other than that I have no problems.
You don't vote unless your leader sends it to vote...
0
username2808800
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Aph)
You don't vote unless your leader sends it to vote...
Oh ok, relatively new here so unsure of the procedure, so the leader of the opposition decides to send it to vote or not?
Can any other party leader
1
RayApparently
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by fleky6910)
Oh ok, relatively new here so unsure of the procedure, so the leader of the opposition decides to send it to vote or not?
Can any other party leader
There are three people with the power to send an SOI to vote. The Minister, the Prime Minister and the Opposition Leader.
0
username2808800
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by RayApparently)
There are three people with the power to send an SOI to vote. The Minister, the Prime Minister and the Opposition Leader.
Not the shadow minister ??
0
RayApparently
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by fleky6910)
Not the shadow minister ??
No.
0
Saracen's Fez
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by fleky6910)
Not the shadow minister ??
No.
0
Jammy Duel
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
It strikes me that even just the trials will have significant costs, let alone full implementation, are there any estimates of the cost of full implementation of the policies?

I also believe the "IT for work" business to be a bit of a case of "have you ever had a job" as there is already over "teaching" of microsoft office and it would be unreasonable to cover job specific software and for most a waste of time, and then we come to proprietary systems both of which are taught on the job. If your school doesn't already teach you how to do the things given then you REALLY need to find a new school, especially since at least most of it seems to already be on the national curriculum, strikes me as wanting something to say so try the Tory tactic.

The exam changes proposed will not have the desired effect, changing how something is assessed does not change that people will easily let the knowledge slide from their memory unless they choose to either retain it or expand on it, ask somebody that has been examined in that way if you don't believe me. Further adding extra time in this way sounds like yet another way to artificially inflate grades that are already heavily inflated as something tells me that the standards expected for better grades would not be increased. If you cannot finish the paper in the time given then you do not deserve to do well, especially when we're only talking about GCSE/A level.

Are the homework changes necessary, even doing 5 A levels there is no shortage of time for independent learning on top of set assignments, there is no reason why they cannot do that independently, as a great many students do. To pretend homework assignments can be useless is absurd, at the end of the day flash cards and reading can only get you so far, without practice VERY few people will be any good at what they are doing, and it also provides the easiest way for teachers to assess where each student is and what assistance they need to improve.

Your selective education proposals also won't have the desired effect, it seems to imply that people can't be tutored in GCSEs like in the 11+, as somebody who went to a highly selective sixth form, there weren't poor people there and a VERY significant proportion of the student population had been privately educated before attending, or had private tutoring, or had the option of private tutoring if they wanted it.

Why are you reintroducing maintenance grants, are loans being reduced at the same time. The current loans cap out, outside of London and without dependents or being on the list of degrees with extra cash at ~£8,500 more than enough to live off of, and that's before throwing in any other funding available, even before the funding increases there were people going to uni with no maintenance loan and padding a savings account due to just how much funding was available to them between the government and university throwing money at them.

There are good bits, there are lots of poorly thought out bits, and some downright unnecessary bits.
0
username1751857
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
It's quite clear a lot of hard work was put into this and I commend Quamquam123 for it

There's some things I would like to just say...

all students will take the European Computer Driving License tests in Year 9, a globally recognised qualification.
I don't agree with making ECDL something compulsory. Schools should have the right to choose if they want to incorporate it into the curriculum. Also ICT GCSE does test students skills with Microsoft Office and with stuff such as spreadsheets and etc... and because students usually catch onto these skills quite quickly I wonder if focusing more on ICT is the right thing to do. I think we should also focus on Computer Science, it is definitely more challenging, I would encourage schools to offer Computer Science to their students due to it being slightly more challenging.

ICT is also turning out to be quite outdated. I would rather see it completely replaced actually, or, at least the internet security and safety parts of it put into Computer Science.

By extending certain exams by just 20 minutes, candidates will be able to answer exams to the best of their ability, without having to constantly worry about the time.
Candidates will be able to answer exams to the best of their ability without extending essay-writing exams by 20 minutes... with enough revision and practice, candidates should be prepared to answer questions under time constraints because exams are supposed to be challenging! I would of course support additional time for students who struggle and may have difficulties but otherwise, everyone should sit the exam in the allocated time the exam boards have decided on.

National Education Service
I don't think I need to say what my view is on this. You can probably guess!

The Department for Education is keen to devolve powers concerning education in Wales to the National Assembly for Wales.
Wales is the worst performing out of all in the UK - they are still the worst-performing in PISA tests and it doesn't look like it will improve. Thus I'm not quite sure if devolving the powers back to Wales will improve their standards, so I will have to disagree with the SoS on this.

The government will release guidelines as part of the updated national curriculum asking schools to reassess their approach to homework as a teaching tool.
As Jammy has said, there's enough time for students at A-Level to do their independent study, whether that is within their free periods at school or time after doing homework at home. I don't think it's necessary for the government to step in and start regulating schools on homework.

On average, wealthier children are more likely to receive a place at grammar schools as their parents may pay for tutoring.
Yes but then it's perfectly fine to advocate these grammar sixth form colleges which as aforementioned by Jammy I don't see how this will have an impact due to the fact there are students who are tutored at GCSEs too. I'd rather we make private tutoring more widely available and affordable.

I don't agree with reintroducing maintenance grants. It simply costs too much and I don't see the problem with applying for a maintenance loan because the money students would get in the maintenance grant has been put into maintenance loans instead (iirc).

The rest of the SoI I'm fine with.
1
BobBobson
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
Why is the government messing so much with schools down to the smallest element like homework and extra-curricular clubs. Why don't we let schools decide for themselves how to spend theit money and let the parents decide for themselves what they want from a school. Obviously for that, you would need to allow schools to have the option to select pupils according to their own criteria. Build competition between schools. Allow them to play with their money. That way you wil get to what is best and also allows schools to specialise in various areas, rather than it being decided what is best from top down by politicians who are guessing what's best based on odd pieces of research and their own ideology. What we need is less government, not more in our education system. Stop intervening. Give each school a certain amount of per-pupil funding adjusted for costs in local areas, hand out a few bonuses here or there eg. for taking students which got rejected from all other schools and schools work. Eventually we can move on to a school voucher system. That's how you do it.

Does a Kipper really have to be calling for this? We have a good number of Libertarians in the house...
2
Jammy Duel
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by BobBobson)
Why is the government messing so much with schools down to the smallest element like homework and extra-curricular clubs. Why don't we let schools decide for themselves how to spend theit money and let the parents decide for themselves what they want from a school. Obviously for that, you would need to allow schools to have the option to select pupils according to their own criteria. Build competition between schools. Allow them to play with their money. That way you wil get to what is best and also allows schools to specialise in various areas, rather than it being decided what is best from top down by politicians who are guessing what's best based on odd pieces of research and their own ideology. What we need is less government, not more in our education system. Stop intervening. Give each school a certain amount of per-pupil funding adjusted for costs in local areas, hand out a few bonuses here or there eg. for taking students which got rejected from all other schools and schools work. Eventually we can move on to a school voucher system. That's how you do it.

Does a Kipper really have to be calling for this? We have a good number of Libertarians in the house...
BEcause nanny knows best
1
username2808800
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by RayApparently)
No.
(Original post by Saracen's Fez)
No.
Personally I don't understand that , amendment time
0
Baron of Sealand
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 2 years ago
#20
(Original post by BobBobson)
Why is the government messing so much with schools down to the smallest element like homework and extra-curricular clubs. Why don't we let schools decide for themselves how to spend theit money and let the parents decide for themselves what they want from a school. Obviously for that, you would need to allow schools to have the option to select pupils according to their own criteria. Build competition between schools. Allow them to play with their money. That way you wil get to what is best and also allows schools to specialise in various areas, rather than it being decided what is best from top down by politicians who are guessing what's best based on odd pieces of research and their own ideology. What we need is less government, not more in our education system. Stop intervening. Give each school a certain amount of per-pupil funding adjusted for costs in local areas, hand out a few bonuses here or there eg. for taking students which got rejected from all other schools and schools work. Eventually we can move on to a school voucher system. That's how you do it.

Does a Kipper really have to be calling for this? We have a good number of Libertarians in the house...
Liberalize education! #FreeEducation
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (11)
68.75%
No I haven't decided yet (3)
18.75%
Yes but I might change my mind (2)
12.5%

Watched Threads

View All