Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey I'll try to keep this post from becoming too long. I was rejected from all 4 med school without interview. I contacted the 4 unis for feedback and the general response was that I was good both academically + non academically but didn't really stand out. Having reread my first ps, I can see how it could be improved. One quality that many med schools were looking for that I didn't cover in my last ps was leadership. I've never been a school prefect or anything and it's too late to become one. Whatelse could show this quality? Would D of E count? or perhaps teaching swimming? (I've done both)

    I'm going to apply to Ireland as well as using my last two. I don't really want to take a 2nd gap year if I don't get in this time either. I thought of putting psychology (+neurscience) as my other 2 because that would interest me, (though not as much as medicine). Considering how competitive pyschology is and how my ps will be tailored to medicine, would this be a waste of my 2 choices (I intend on taking one of them if I don't get in anywhere?

    I've been reading some popular science books recently (not for med school just for interest) but I ws wondering if it was worth mentionning any of them in my ps. On the one hand, it would show my interest in science. But it could be as disadvantageous as showing a preference to a speciality/area in science because if it came up in an interview, the interviewers would probably know more about it than I would. So do you think I should mention them?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    You could apply for a life sciences/allied to medicine degree and transfer to medicine within the university (assuming the university allow this) after completing the first year of the degree having shown youre capapble of university level work.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Medicine should be a purely postgrad subject.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Teaching swimming is a position of responsibility isn't it? I mean, you had to make sure everyone was safe in the pool and you had a control a group of people, right? So, yes, put that down.

    Psychology is quite competitive so you might not get offers if your PS is solely medicine based. Biomedical science courses would be better, but put psychology is you want, although make sure you mention a little bit about it in your PS perhaps.

    Mention the science books but don't go on and on about them.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    Medicine should be a purely postgrad subject.
    Totally agree.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Totally agree.
    Or at least more graduate places should be made available ...
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    Medicine should be a purely postgrad subject.
    Interesting idea and definately one which should be considered. I also agree there are far fewer post grad options for it currently than there should be.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Interesting idea and definately one which should be considered. I also agree there are far fewer post grade options for it currently than there should be.
    16 is too young.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    16 is too young.
    Yes. I also think that making it a requirement that all applicants to medicine have spent at least a year working in health is something which should be considered.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Totally agree.
    Umm only becuase you're a grad yourself. The current system is fine..that good applicants become doctors..whats wrong with it? are you saying that if you could youd rather have it so that ONLY grads of any degree could apply, startying form say this year? well there's already a shortage of doctors and UK cannot afford to deter any excellent applicants just because they have to have 2 degrees and therefore incur a lot of debt.
    Many applicants whod make brill doctors are not applyign because of the amount of debt that they would incur and to force them to complete a pre degree is absurd.

    I repeat the current system is fine. Besides if you pick wrong A levels or get poor grades there are plently of places through GEP and wider access.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Yes. I also think that making it a requirement that all applicants to medicine have spent at least a year working in health is something which should be considered.
    Most applicants have much work experience in both/either medical or caring environment. What do you mean by an extra year in healthcare?? do you mean that an extra year in healthcare must be complteted before actually applying? if so that would be complete stupid as then everyone has the same opportunity and universites will not be able to differentiate between the applicants. Whereas now applicants who get off their backside and actually do some extra cirruc work get chances.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    16 is too young.
    Well what should actually be done instead of your "grads only" idea, is that schools should be forced by the government to have proper careers and higher education sessions from about when students do their GCSEs and before they pick their A levels.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angelica)
    Hey I'll try to keep this post from becoming too long. I was rejected from all 4 med school without interview. I contacted the 4 unis for feedback and the general response was that I was good both academically + non academically but didn't really stand out. Having reread my first ps, I can see how it could be improved. One quality that many med schools were looking for that I didn't cover in my last ps was leadership. I've never been a school prefect or anything and it's too late to become one. Whatelse could show this quality? Would D of E count? or perhaps teaching swimming? (I've done both)

    I'm going to apply to Ireland as well as using my last two. I don't really want to take a 2nd gap year if I don't get in this time either. I thought of putting psychology (+neurscience) as my other 2 because that would interest me, (though not as much as medicine). Considering how competitive pyschology is and how my ps will be tailored to medicine, would this be a waste of my 2 choices (I intend on taking one of them if I don't get in anywhere?

    I've been reading some popular science books recently (not for med school just for interest) but I ws wondering if it was worth mentionning any of them in my ps. On the one hand, it would show my interest in science. But it could be as disadvantageous as showing a preference to a speciality/area in science because if it came up in an interview, the interviewers would probably know more about it than I would. So do you think I should mention them?
    HEY!! THERE'S SOMETHING I KNOW WHICH COULD INTEREST U! BRADFORD OFFERS A FOUNDATION COURSE IN CLINICAL SCIENCES OF 1 YR. ITS INTAKE IS APPROX 120 PUPILS. AFTER THAT 1 YR, THE 20 BEST STUDENTS TRANSFER TO LEEDS MEDICAL SCHOOL FOR THEIR 1ST YEAR MBCHB. THE REST (OR THOSE WHO REFUSE TO TRANSFER TO THE MEDICAL COURSE), THEN CARRY ON WITH THE CLINICAL SCIENCE COURSE FOR ONE MORE YEAR, AND AT THE END OF THAT YEAR, THE BEST 20 STUDENTS TRANSFER TO LEEDS MEDICAL SCHOOL AND GET DIRECT ENTRY INTO THE 2ND YEAR OF THE MBCHB PROGRAMME! HOPE THIS HAS BEEN OF SOME HELP! CHECK THE BRADFORD WEBSITE!!!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    Medicine should be a purely postgrad subject.
    *cries*

    Gayboy - I do see your point about higher education sessions and more careers advice, but some people do change while at uni - some medics realise it's not for them, and some non-medics finally realise it's what they want to do. Making it a grad only subject would be harsh though, I think (but probably only cos I'm an undergrad medic and shiny wants rid of me )
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I don't agree medicine should be a grad only subject. Although a grad myself and about to embark on the third year of a grad entry course, the majority of doctors who teach me medicine were students who studied traditionaly and they are fantastic doctors and teachers. Its worked for ages, at the end of the day its about choosing when its good for you. Some people know at A-level or before, some don't decide until they are doming their first degree. Then there are those who couldn't get in the first time round because they couldn't meet the acaedemic requirements.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PJ2020)
    I don't agree medicine should be a grad only subject. Although a grad myself and about to embark on the third year of a grad entry course, the majority of doctors who teach me medicine were students who studied traditionaly and they are fantastic doctors and teachers. Its worked for ages, at the end of the day its about choosing when its good for you. Some people know at A-level or before, some don't decide until they are doming their first degree. Then there are those who couldn't get in the first time round because they couldn't meet the acaedemic requirements.
    RIGHT!! i totally agree with you! i'm about to start my MBChB course and i'm sure i made the right choice. I would certainly not fancy doing a 1st degree, then embarking into graduate entry for medicine when i've already made up my mind to be a doctor from A levels!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Yes. I also think that making it a requirement that all applicants to medicine have spent at least a year working in health is something which should be considered.

    I'm 16 and have just finished my GCSE's. I've always known I want to be a doctor, and have spent the last fifteen months shadowing a GP one afternoon per week at a local surgery. I'm already getting more hands on experience than a lot of first year med students (although I don't claim to have the breadth or depth of knowledge they do). I wouldn't want to waste three years doing a degree I'm not really interested in, before applying to med school?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I was thinking more of ...
    - More Graduate Entry Medicine places
    - Fully funded graduate entry places
    - Most entrants will have a relevant degree (e.g. Biology or Chemistry or related) but the extra places will allow physical science people in too (I am not envisioning letting many Arts degree students enter, sorry )

    This would mean that people who are really sure they want to do medicine don't waste time doing something irrelevant. In fact the increased training in core sciences could be beneficial, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3601523.stm

    There would be less debt burden on medics as a sort-of reward for proving (without doubt) they are capable of university level study and are not going to "jump ship" and leave the medical profession for more lucrative industries.

    It will also give more time for people to think about what they want to do and allow them to get whatever work and life experiences they need. I see this as a better means of widening access than lowering A-Level entry grades and using socioeconomic factors. I think what people, who are genuinely disadvantaged, need is time to catch up rather than cheap favours.

    Finally, by opening up routes into medicine, it would potentially allow a more diverse medical workforce. I would like to see more people with technology backgrounds in medicine, for example, who could bring their prior expertise to spot the technological solutions to problems in medicine. (The solution to increasing demands on the health system cannot be to simply increase staffing levels.) Alternative modes of thinking and design could also be developed.

    I think I was wrong to say that medicine should be a purely grad subject. What I really meant was that entry into medicine should be more diverse and easily accessible.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GayBoy)
    Most applicants have much work experience in both/either medical or caring environment. What do you mean by an extra year in healthcare?? do you mean that an extra year in healthcare must be complteted before actually applying? if so that would be complete stupid as then everyone has the same opportunity and universites will not be able to differentiate between the applicants. Whereas now applicants who get off their backside and actually do some extra cirruc work get chances.
    That doesnt actually make any sense, but il make a stab at covering what i think confuses you. By having at least year spent in relevant medical work as a basic requirement you could be sure that all applicants would be aware of the demands of their prospective work in the type of workplace they will encounter thus ensuring that all aplicants are truly serious about their chosen profession which is something the occasional day of work experience during term time does not give anyone.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nikki J S)
    I'm 16 and have just finished my GCSE's. I've always known I want to be a doctor, and have spent the last fifteen months shadowing a GP one afternoon per week at a local surgery. I'm already getting more hands on experience than a lot of first year med students (although I don't claim to have the breadth or depth of knowledge they do). I wouldn't want to waste three years doing a degree I'm not really interested in, before applying to med school?
    It would hardly be a waste if the undergrad degree is relevant to medicine, as it presumably would be. Probably the best degree system for undergrad medicine is that in place at St.Andrews whereby you study Medical Science for 3 years and are awarded a full degree at the end of that period with a guarenteed place for the clinical years to qualify with the MBchB at Manchester Uni (now Edinburgh i think.)
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: August 16, 2004

University open days

  1. University of Cambridge
    Christ's College Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Sep '18
  2. Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 28 Sep '18
  3. Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 29 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.