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Books with hardest vocabulary (not Shakespeare) watch

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    I have read many classics and I have not come across any impressive hard vocabulary.Some fo the books I have read are the following Dracula,war and peace,great expectations,pride and prejudice and great gatsby.

    Does anyone know any books with really good vocabulary?
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    Try Chaucer
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    David Foster Wallace is probably the modern novelist most known for his complex vocabulary.
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    The English Dictionary
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    Silas Marner
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    Yeah Chaucer for the win.


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    I read baby books because I don't know any English
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    Winnie The Pooh and Harry Potter


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    Paradise Lost by John Milton? Although it's the syntax that is tough
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I have read many classics and I have not come across any impressive hard vocabulary.Some fo the books I have read are the following Dracula,war and peace,great expectations,pride and prejudice and great gatsby.

    Does anyone know any books with really good vocabulary?
    Writing isn't about using long words to compensate for only having a little penis. It's about getting an idea across, using words to make the reader feel what you want them to feel.

    Likewise, this post smacks more of showing off that you like grandiose phraseology than anything else, which makes it hard to take you seriously. Yes, I use some obscure words in my own books, usually when giving proper descriptions of things or where it's use this single word or use a dozen - or again when there's an English word that's relatively unknown and a foreign one is often used instead*. But I never make it a point, and always make sure the word's meaning can be derived from context. As a writer, I don't see a point in sending my readers to the dictionary every ten minutes. But then, as a writer, I like the idea that maybe I can teach the reader something.

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    Gravity's Rainbow
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    Some excerpts of the drama Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare. It is the Middle English what made some problems to understand as a foreigner whose mother tongue isn't English.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Some excerpts of the drama Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare. It is the Middle English what made some problems to understand as a foreigner whose mother tongue isn't English.
    Shakespeare is Modern English, try again.
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    Try reading James Joyce's 'Ulysses. I applaud anyone who managed to follow the entirety of the book without getting lost or wondering what the hell is this sentence going on about.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Shakespeare is Modern English, try again.
    And which one first? Romeo and Juliet? MacBeth? Hamlet? others? there are so many to begin with. Asked differently: what is the best for beginners?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    And which one first? Romeo and Juliet? MacBeth? Hamlet? others? there are so many to begin with. Asked differently: what is the best for beginners?
    Macbeth, or maybe A Midsummer Night's Dream. They're interesting and funny, easy to understand, and have good plots.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Macbeth, or maybe A Midsummer Night's Dream. They're interesting and funny, easy to understand, and have good plots.
    Good, I will give those dramas of Shakespeare a chance. As a rule I don't like to read something in Middle language, it is so outdated and sometimes hard to understand.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Macbeth, or maybe A Midsummer Night's Dream. They're interesting and funny, easy to understand, and have good plots.
    Not sure I recall the humour in Macbeth.
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    Not sure I recall the humour in Macbeth.
    Well it's not a wholly funny play, but there is humour there. You might want to read it again and pay attention to the words.
 
 
 
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