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    Hi,
    I'm a graduate looking at studying att. I just have a few queries. Basically I'm at the beginning stages of att but sometimes my mind keeps going back to acca.
    I'm more than aware that att will 'pigeon hole' me into the tax area only whereas acca would give me more a more broad qualification but I want to ask what are the experiences of people who have done both or either qualification. From my understanding acca would probably take longer (I know people who have still been doing acca for 6-7 years) whereas att might only take approx 2yrs. Is acca harder than att or vice versa?

    I have also been looking briefly at cta- do most people who have done att go towards cta or any other routes. In other words, must you take cta after att?
    I have seen that there are a few other courses available (adit, other diplomas, taxation specialist degrees etc etc). I have again been looking (very briefly) about some comments regarding cta in some forums but a lot of the comments tend to be before 2010. Has anyone studied cta in the past 3 or 4 years and how long did it take you. Looking at the pass rates for the exams (on the CIOT website)- they seem to be okay pass rates- in some cases better than the pass rates for some acca papers.
    What are the pass rates for cta now. I have heard from one person that the cta exams are actually easier now compared to a decade ago?

    Any comments appreciated.
    Thanks.
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    Also, I hope I'm not giving the impression that I'm picking the easier/shorter path.
    I know that all of these professional exams (att, acca, cima, cta, cipfa etc) require hard work especially with other commitments that we all have. I'm okay with spending the next couple of years studying (also because I don't exactly have a social life now) but I am returning to studying after some time now and may need to take this at my own pace.
    Thats why the modular structure of the att (and possibly cta) exams suits me as I can study at my own pace and do the exams when I feel confident. With acca and cima, I think there are now time limits (i.e. you must complete acca by ten yrs) and I also believe that the pass mark for cima has gone to 70%.
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    So I am in the midst of studying ATT and I will be progressing to CTA afterwards.

    Depending on your academic ability, you could sit all three ATT papers at one sitting and get them over and done with. You would then need to sit two Computer Based Examinations (CBEs) on Law and Ethics. These are multiple choice and from my experience of sitting them last week, I didn't find them hard at all. Most people will pass Ethics first time but may need an extra go at Law.

    I have passed two ATT papers, the CBEs and I have my last paper in May. Unfortunately I'll only be exam qualified at that point as you will need two years relevant experience in order to gain membership.

    As long as all goes well in May, I'll be progressing to CTA in November. If you follow from ATT you do not need to retake the CBEs. Also, if you register as a Tax Pathway student, which streamlines the ATT/CTA process, you essentially get off one exam as you can choose to do either 3 ATT papers and 3 CTA (no CTA awareness) or 2 ATT papers and 4 CTA (inc CTA awareness).

    There is a massive jump in difficulty between ATT and CTA. There is also negative marking in CTA which there isn't in ATT (i.e. for ATT if you got something wrong at the top calculation you lose marks there, but not further down whereas with CTA you lose marks throughout).

    If i'm honest, I'm going for CTA for the prestige of it. It's widely considered the 'gold-standard' for tax individuals and you can pretty much walk into a Tax Manager job after qualifying. Plus being female, on wanting to have a family in a few years, it will be easier for me to get back into the profession with the qualifications behind me as opposed to not.

    Oh, and I don't care that I am pigeon holed in tax because it is where I want to be. I hate accountancy with a passion. I had to learn it for ATT Paper 2 and now I've passed it I've dumped all that accountancy rubbish from my brain.
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    (Original post by Alarae)

    Oh, and I don't care that I am pigeon holed in tax because it is where I want to be. I hate accountancy with a passion. I had to learn it for ATT Paper 2 and now I've passed it I've dumped all that accountancy rubbish from my brain.
    That is a shame as the catch is profits before tax (pre adjustment) start with accounting profits as derived using GAAP, so a knowledge of accounting (even if you never prepare a set of accounts in your working life) is helpful re tax. This is currently especially true given the impact say FRS102 now has at arriving at profits before tax.

    However I do tend to agree re fulfillment-tax I find interesting, accounts I do because they have to be done but they are mainly a chore and audit is like I imagine purgatory; also clients like people in tax as they are there to save them money, so if needy for feeling wanted tax is the way to go.
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    I have not forgotten the foundations of accountancy; I can draft a set of accounts if needed to I just would really, really prefer not to. So in terms of the tax I do understand how the figures have been arrived at, I would just rather someone else got to that point and then I take over

    I prefer the personal taxation side and I am taking an individual/inheritance tax route. I would rather work with individuals rather than businesses and this choice means that my exposure to accounting work is limited.

    Ironically two of my colleagues both trained in accountancy (ACA/ACCA) but transferred to tax not too long after qualifying.

    Accountancy v taxation seems to be personal preference.
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    Do not pick the ATT/CTA path. It is not a short cut and is designed to work against you. If u do the ACCA then CTA path, u will get two charted qualification and u don't have to do the ATT and the final CTA exam.

    The final CTA exam can be in any topic in your 3000 page qualification. The examiners will change the format whenever they want. It is not worth the hassle.

    Essentially, they try to make it difficult for ATT/CTA so that they can say it's hard but give free passes to ACCA and ACA so they get more subscription fees.
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    Guys, in Spain they do no teach you how to study to keep you in the education for ever. , but I got a book here that talk about scrpting, like for a film or a theatre play. After u can record it or try to memorise it reafing it ( no perfectly). It is superfast. After, when you ate no doing much you try to remembrr the scripts. Sorry for the spelling, but my phone is no working too well.
 
 
 
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