A level help for acc. and finance Watch

DA39
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Hello all,
I'm currently doing a levels in the following:
Maths, Econ, English lit. and Spanish.
I want to ask whether or not these are sufficient enough subjects for an acc. and fin degree at a top russell group uni, or should i have opted for more quantitative subjects like physics/chem and/or further maths?
I am seeking advice from prospective, current and former acc. and finance students.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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Juno
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(Original post by DA39)
Hello all,
I'm currently doing a levels in the following:
Maths, Econ, English lit. and Spanish.
I want to ask whether or not these are sufficient enough subjects for an acc. and fin degree at a top russell group uni, or should i have opted for more quantitative subjects like physics/chem and/or further maths?
I am seeking advice from prospective, current and former acc. and finance students.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
The main subject rerequirement for accounting and finance is maths, which you have. You'll also need maths and English GCSE grades at B or above (this is still needed even though you have A Levels in those subjects). So yes, your A Level choices are absolutely fine.

You'll need to work hard and get good grades. You'll want at least ABB, although depending which exact unis you're looking at you might even need higher.
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DA39
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(Original post by Juno)
The main subject rerequirement for accounting and finance is maths, which you have. You'll also need maths and English GCSE grades at B or above (this is still needed even though you have A Levels in those subjects). So yes, your A Level choices are absolutely fine.

You'll need to work hard and get good grades. You'll want at least ABB, although depending which exact unis you're looking at you might even need higher.

Thanks so much for the reply. I've actually been looking into other courses and found economics and politics, which I think really suits me. (govt. and econ.) at LSE. I'd like to go into a sector of private banking after uni, such as IB or AM. In your opinion, which do you think would be better for my career choice?
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Juno
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(Original post by DA39)
Thanks so much for the reply. I've actually been look into other courses and found economics and politics, which I think really suits me. (govt. and econ.) at LSE. I'd like to go into a sector of private banking after uni, such as IB or AM. In your opinion, which do you think would be better for my career choice?
I realise this isn't quite what you're asking, but you need to be very careful with your personal statement if applying to LSE. They have a high number of applicants for their economics degree, and thus are known to be competitive. Some applicants apply to the "economics and..." degrees rather than straight economics, because they believe those subjects to be less competitive and so they think they're more likely to get an offer. LSE don't like this, and reject applicants who they think are doing this.
This means that if you're applying for an "economics and..." degree at LSE, you need to make it perfectly clear that you love the actual subject you're applying for. Make sure that anyone reading your PS sees your enthusiasm for government and economics. You don't want them to jump to the conclusion that actually you prefer straight economics, because if they do then you're just heading for rejection.

Your best career choice is whichever you think you'll enjoy the most. Banking needs a good degree grade, so you need to pick a subject you're motivated to do well in. Research each degree course carefully and decide based on your own interests. You will find that degrees vary between unis, so some courses may be better (or worse) for you as they have modules you're more (or less) interested in. Some unis will also allow you more free choice, so even if you do pick one degree you may be able to take some modules from the other subject. For example, if you look at Economics at York you will noteice it says "Elective modules from other departments are not permitted", whereas the same degree at Nottingham says "Plus further optional economics modules or modules from any other school".
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DA39
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(Original post by Juno)
I realise this isn't quite what you're asking, but you need to be very careful with your personal statement if applying to LSE. They have a high number of applicants for their economics degree, and thus are known to be competitive. Some applicants apply to the "economics and..." degrees rather than straight economics, because they believe those subjects to be less competitive and so they think they're more likely to get an offer. LSE don't like this, and reject applicants who they think are doing this.
This means that if you're applying for an "economics and..." degree at LSE, you need to make it perfectly clear that you love the actual subject you're applying for. Make sure that anyone reading your PS sees your enthusiasm for government and economics. You don't want them to jump to the conclusion that actually you prefer straight economics, because if they do then you're just heading for rejection.

Your best career choice is whichever you think you'll enjoy the most. Banking needs a good degree grade, so you need to pick a subject you're motivated to do well in. Research each degree course carefully and decide based on your own interests. You will find that degrees vary between unis, so some courses may be better (or worse) for you as they have modules you're more (or less) interested in. Some unis will also allow you more free choice, so even if you do pick one degree you may be able to take some modules from the other subject. For example, if you look at Economics at York you will noteice it says "Elective modules from other departments are not permitted", whereas the same degree at Nottingham says "Plus further optional economics modules or modules from any other school".
Thanks again, to be honest if I were to study economics I'd prefer to study it with another discipline like politics rather that on its own. I'll reconsider my career options and keep an open mind.
Thanks for the help!
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Juno
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(Original post by DA39)
Thanks again, to be honest if I were to study economics I'd prefer to study it with another discipline like politics rather that on its own. I'll reconsider my career options and keep an open mind.
Thanks for the help!
Yes, my economics degrees were just an example because I know about those - but it shows how a degree with the same course name will differ between universities
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