Why are men's rights activists always villianised/trivillized in the media? Watch

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minimarshmallow
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The "men's rights" activists and groups that I've heard of are mostly the kind that go about raising any potential issues in a way that is silencing women and not acknowledging that these issues are two sides of the same coin. If you only ever say "Men get raped too" and don't drop the too and have that as it's own statement, then your movement isn't about men's rights, it's about jumping on feminism.

I hope there are men's rights activists and groups that actually do care about the issues that men face and how we can work towards rectifying them (it's usually the same thing feminists are working towards, dismantling patriarchy will do it for higher suicide rates and child custody and male victims of rape and domestic violence etc.) but they're not the ones that we're hearing about. They need to be more vocal, and also to dismiss the anti-feminists who are masquerading as being a part of their movement and getting the publicity because they can be spun in a more entertaining way.
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LazyBazooka
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Because men are expected to be tough, to man up and just deal with whatever is troubling them. And because the media has portrayed men, particularly straight white men, as the most privileged demographic, and therefore any issues said group might have are considered trivial compared to the issues of any other group.
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Retired_Messiah
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(Original post by WBZ144)
MRA, Red Pill and MGTOW sections
lmao Red Pill has never been a proper men's rights activist group, it's a ****ed offshoot of pickup artists. MGTOW has similar philosophy to Red Pill but instead came to the conclusion that relationships with women are absolutely terrible due to a "gynocentrist" society (like patriarchy but the opposite), and figured it better to avoid doing anything with them at all. It's basically what would happen if you took radical feminism and flipped the genders around. Neither of those groups are really 'pure' MRA groups as such as the philosophies they're based on are both ideas that at their core claim that women are terrible, just the former tries to find a way of getting regular sex despite the fact.
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username521617
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(Original post by minimarshmallow)
The "men's rights" activists and groups that I've heard of are mostly the kind that go about raising any potential issues in a way that is silencing women and not acknowledging that these issues are two sides of the same coin. If you only ever say "Men get raped too" and don't drop the too and have that as it's own statement, then your movement isn't about men's rights, it's about jumping on feminism.

I hope there are men's rights activists and groups that actually do care about the issues that men face and how we can work towards rectifying them (it's usually the same thing feminists are working towards, dismantling patriarchy will do it for higher suicide rates and child custody and male victims of rape and domestic violence etc.) but they're not the ones that we're hearing about. They need to be more vocal, and also to dismiss the anti-feminists who are masquerading as being a part of their movement and getting the publicity because they can be spun in a more entertaining way.
They say "men get raped too" because all the focus has been on women getting raped. Men's rights groups bring up the fact male victims of sex crimes and domestic violence are being ignored and neglected. Which they are. And that doesn't "silence women" at all. I don't know if you've noticed, but women get almost all the attention on these issues.

Oftentimes these groups will jump on feminism because feminists have be become the source of the problem. They push the "women are the victims, men are the perpetrators" narrative that results in this neglect. Feminist idealogues in the US actually implemented a law enforcement policy that limits the number of women that can be arrested for domestic violence. Something as low as 5-10%. Sometimes they have to arrest the man even though he is the victim. When we see CDC reports suggesting men are more than a third of victims of sexual partner violence, you can see why this is a problem.

I have the named several major MRA organisations and charities on the first page of this thread that work towards rectifying men's issues. You don't hear about MRAs doing good things because they aren't given any good publicity. This is more a symptom of the feminist control of gender issues in the media than a lack of trying on the MRAs' part. Feminist rags like Jezebel and Vox will label MRAs misogynsts simply for having a focus on men's issues or for challenging feminists on their domination of gender topics. They've been turned into pariahs.
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Drewski
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Because most of them are prize winning numpties.

Pretty much the only ones who are on a decent standing, despite the sometimes comical appearance, is father's for justice.
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Jammy Duel
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Patriarchy *autistic screaming*

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minimarshmallow
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
They say "men get raped too" because all the focus has been on women getting raped. Men's rights groups bring up the fact male victims of sex crimes and domestic violence are being ignored and neglected. Which they are. And that doesn't "silence women" at all. I don't know if you've noticed, but women get almost all the attention on these issues.

Oftentimes these groups will jump on feminism because feminists have be become the source of the problem. They push the "women are the victims, men are the perpetrators" narrative that results in this neglect. Feminist idealogues in the US actually implemented a law enforcement policy that limits the number of women that can be arrested for domestic violence. Something as low as 5-10%. Sometimes they have to arrest the man even though he is the victim. When we see CDC reports suggesting men are more than a third of victims of sexual partner violence, you can see why this is a problem.

I have the named several major MRA organisations and charities on the first page of this thread that work towards rectifying men's issues. You don't hear about MRAs doing good things because they aren't given any good publicity. This is more a symptom of the feminist control of gender issues in the media than a lack of trying on the MRAs' part. Feminist rags like Jezebel and Vox will label MRAs misogynsts simply for having a focus on men's issues or for challenging feminists on their domination of gender topics. They've been turned into pariahs.
So, make the conversation about male rape victims. Don't just try to hijack a conversation about female rape victims and then wonder why the women are angry at you for it. The conversation is about female rape victims because the female rape victims have made it so. Feel free to do something.

Well, in the case of rape in this country, men are the perpetrators because that's the law - a law that wasn't made by feminists, but by men. I don't know anything about that law in the US, do you have any more info on it, because I certainly wouldn't support that and don't think it fits within the definition of feminism to support that either. Particularly in fourth wave feminism, the taking down of patriarchal values and gender roles would mean this would be bizarre, as it goes against the removal of the woman as soft and the man as tough. From what I can tell, modern feminism would be against this, and their work would be working against it.

I mean, I've heard of fathers for justice and their campaigns for mens parental rights, but in the same way we know about Katie Hopkins because she shouts the loudest and she's the easiest to criticise, you're going to hear about the misogynist things that so-called MRAs do, feminists like myself are going to have personal experience of so-called MRAs attacking them on twitter with no actual point, and less about the good (simply put, the actual MRAs rather than the so-called, aren't replying to my tweets in a snarky way, so I'm not coming across them).

Jezebel and Vox are hardly mainstream media. I'm reading Caroline Criado-Perez's book Do It Like a Woman at the moment (unfortunately I think I've left it on my desk at work, so can't get the exact figures till tomorrow because I can't remember the exact source either) and an analysis of the mainstream media found its still mostly men writing mostly about men, especially when it comes to things like politics, so it's not like women have control of the media.
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username521617
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(Original post by minimarshmallow)
So, make the conversation about male rape victims. Don't just try to hijack a conversation about female rape victims and then wonder why the women are angry at you for it. The conversation is about female rape victims because the female rape victims have made it so. Feel free to do something.
MRA groups are trying to make the conversation about male victims. But the public discourse is so dominated by so-called "women's issues" that it's hard to get a foothold. This is why MRAs will try to "hijack" the conversation. When there are domestic violence awareness campaigns, for instance, they usually exclude male victims and portray men as the sole perpetrators, so the MRAs interject. They're tired of women always being the focus, so they'll take any platform they can get and seek to counter anything that fosters the idea that these things are purely women's issues. MRA's are generally just tired of the female victoomhood narrative, so will challenge it when they see things misrepresented or presented in a lopsided way.

(Original post by minimarshmallow)
Well, in the case of rape in this country, men are the perpetrators because that's the law - a law that wasn't made by feminists, but by men. I don't know anything about that law in the US, do you have any more info on it, because I certainly wouldn't support that and don't think it fits within the definition of feminism to support that either. Particularly in fourth wave feminism, the taking down of patriarchal values and gender roles would mean this would be bizarre, as it goes against the removal of the woman as soft and the man as tough. From what I can tell, modern feminism would be against this, and their work would be working against it.

I mean, I've heard of fathers for justice and their campaigns for mens parental rights, but in the same way we know about Katie Hopkins because she shouts the loudest and she's the easiest to criticise, you're going to hear about the misogynist things that so-called MRAs do, feminists like myself are going to have personal experience of so-called MRAs attacking them on twitter with no actual point, and less about the good (simply put, the actual MRAs rather than the so-called, aren't replying to my tweets in a snarky way, so I'm not coming across them).
There seems to be a disconnect between how you see feminism and what feminism is actually doing in government, academia and media.


(Original post by minimarshmallow)
Jezebel and Vox are hardly mainstream media. I'm reading Caroline Criado-Perez's book Do It Like a Woman at the moment (unfortunately I think I've left it on my desk at work, so can't get the exact figures till tomorrow because I can't remember the exact source either) and an analysis of the mainstream media found its still mostly men writing mostly about men, especially when it comes to things like politics, so it's not like women have control of the media.
I bring up Jezebel and Vox because they're the worst. But mainstream publications like The Guardian or even the BBC do it to. Even though most journalists are men, when the topics concern gender issues, it's almost entirely dominated by a focus on women, even when men suffer from the same issues in large numbers. They're the unseen victims that it has become taboo to mention, because we're "stealing the conversation away from women" and being woman-hating man-babies if we do. And it hurts men, because they lose out on the help they need and often end up being persecuted.
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Douglas Milnes
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Men's rights activists very often campaign on things that matter. Things like male suicide, mental health, homelessness, child access, education, statutory legal discrimination, and much more.That you call them 'minimist' - a term I've not come across in 15 years of campaigning for men's rights - indicates that you are getting skewed information.
Last edited by Douglas Milnes; 4 weeks ago
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yudothis
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Because in most cases they don't truly focus on men's issues (they just bring them up whenever women talk, "but what about us menz") and instead just hate women. They project. They accuse feminist ("feminazis") of hating men (sure, some do, most don't) because they hate women.
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Douglas Milnes
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(Original post by yudothis)
Because in most cases they don't truly focus on men's issues (they just bring them up whenever women talk, "but what about us menz") and instead just hate women. They project. They accuse feminist ("feminazis") of hating men (sure, some do, most don't) because they hate women.
Let me give a simple example of what goes on to show why you have a mistaken viewpoint.

The government decides it needs to come out with a new domestic violence policy/law. "Great," say men's rights advocates, "we need some new policies because the current ones are sexist against men, don't help children and most of all don't work to stop domestic violence."

The government then announce that they are commencing discussions about what the new policy/law will be, under the auspices of their "Violence against women" initiative.

What? "But what about men and children." say men's rights advocates (see, you were right: someone talks about women and men say "what about us" [more accurately, what about all men, and children, and the long term effect on women and society, too]).

"Oh, don't worry," say the government, "this will be a gender-neutral policy." At which men's groups (somewhat understandably dubious, I will admit) start to prepare submissions and request to take part in the discussions. They don't have the tax-payer funding of women's groups (the salary of the CEO of one of the women's businesses [hard to call it a 'charity'] has a salary - all by itself - which would pay for all men's groups for FIVE years) but the men's groups have plenty of evidence to submit and hard working volunteers - who try to ignore being told they 'don't focus on men's issues' and 'just hate women' - spend their evenings and weekends assembling the proof of ways to truly reduce domestic violence. They've been doing this since the 1970s but they do it all over again, adding in fresh evidence and having to redraft to fit the new requirements.

But the men's groups don't get invited to talk. The men's groups submissions end up having to go in as the same class as any other private individual, because the committee appointed to draw up the new policies/law doesn't consider these psychologists, doctors, practitioners and victims to have the status required for a formal submission.

And a new law comes out which won't solve anything. All it will do is give more money to the same (feminist) organisations that have totally failed to curb the issue over the past two generations. And cannot solve the issue because they treat the issue through a political lens instead of as the genuine social and health issue that it is. And probably don't even want to solve the issue because they are getting millions of pounds every year from the government, only a fraction of which they are spending on victims of domestic violence anyway.

So are men justified to be bitter about that kind of treatment? Do they have a reason to be saying "what about men (and children, and families, and society, and therefore ultimately women as well)"?

When you have actually tried doing something for men and found it easy and without feminist resistance, THEN start posting about the hard working men and women in the men's rights movement. Until you do have an idea what you are talking about, do us the favour of shutting up so that you aren't just another part of the problem.
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