World Kidney Day 2017

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Rum Ham
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Every year on the second Thursday of March, World Kidney Day (WKD) is held, which began in 2006. The aim of the day is to raise awareness about kidney health - both in terms of how to maintain good kidney health and also raise awareness about kidney diseases. As someone who's papa had kidney cancer and is now on the transplant list awaiting a new kidney and receives daily home dialysis due to kidney failure and also that my partner's mum died from kidney cancer in her 30s, I thought I'd make a post about this day and get us talking about something most of us (including myself before my papa became ill) never really give a second thought about.

My papa's story
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My papa is my grandpa but I call him papa due to that's how we call grandpa's where I come from plus it means dad and he raised me instead of my biological dad, so I see him as nothing less than my dad and much more than just my grandpa.

He has sadly always had bad health. He has has rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, anaemia, angina and a lot of other things for as long as I can remember. In 2009, my papa fell ill with the shingles. It seems to clear up well but a niggling pain on his right side where the shingles rash was remained and a few weeks later, he started having a lot of blood in his urine and felt awful. He was first diagnosed with having an urine infection but after the pain got worse, he ended up at A&E and was seen by a renal consultant and he felt a lump in my papa's flank area and it turned out to be a tumour. He was diagnosed with stage one kidney cancer. Luckily, he only needed surgery and then monitored for 5 years. He didn't have any chemo or radiation.

3 or 4 years on from that, his cancer didn't return but his remaining kidney began to fail due to diabetes and the stress on his body from only having one kidney. He was put on the transplant list and given home dialysis. Me, my mum and gran were tested to see if we were a match but sadly none of us were and he is still on the list. Last year, two matches were found for him but when they opened up the donor, the kidneys were found to be unusable but we're not giving up hope that he may one day get a kidney. As for now, he is just getting over peritonitis and apart from that, he is doing as well as he can be



So lets get started

What do our kidneys do?
The main job of your kidneys is to remove toxins and excess water from your blood. Kidneys also help to control your blood pressure, to produce red blood cells and to keep your bones health. Each roughly the size of your fist, kidneys are located deep in the abdomen, beneath the rib cage.

Your kidneys control blood stream levels of many minerals and molecules including sodium and potassium, and help to control blood acidity. Every day your kidneys carefully control the salt and water in your body so that your blood pressure remains the same.

Some kidney related facts
*In a single hour, kidneys receive around 120 pints of blood
*If the nephrons in both kidneys are taken out and placed end to end horizontally, they will cover a distance of 16 kilometres
*Kidney disease can never be reversed. Its progression can only be slowed down
*Nearly 1.5 million globally go through kidney transplant or kidney dialysis


The 8 golden rules to keeping your kidneys healthy
*Remain as fit and active as possible
*Keep control of your blood sugar levels
*Monitor your blood pressure
*Keep an eye on your weight
*Maintain a healthy fluid intake
*Don't smoke
*Try not to take OTC medication often
*Get your kidney function checked if you are in a high risk group for kidney disease - overweight, diabetic, have a family history of kidney disease, have high blood pressure

What are the most common kidney conditions?
*Chronic Kidney disease
*Kidney cancer
*Kidney infections
*Kidney stones

What is dialysis?
Dialysis is a procedure to remove waste products and excess fluid from the blood when the kidneys stop working properly. It often involves diverting blood to a machine to be cleaned. Some people have to go to hospital a few times a week to get this done but my papa gets to do it at home but has to do it daily. Renal nurses visit him every day to set up his machine for him for the following night and he gets blood taken often. Although he is grateful he gets to do it at home instead of having to go to hospital a lot, he is at risk of complications and regularly suffers from peritonitis as a result of the dialysis.

For more info on kidney health and disease, please feel free to follow these links
http://www.worldkidneyday.org/
http://factslegend.org/35-facts-human-kidneys/
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Dialysi...roduction.aspx
http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-dis...y-disease-ckd/
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Nirvana1989-1994
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(Original post by Spock's Socks)
Every year on the second Thursday of March, World Kidney Day (WKD) is held, which began in 2006. The aim of the day is to raise awareness about kidney health - both in terms of how to maintain good kidney health and also raise awareness about kidney diseases. As someone who's papa had kidney cancer and is now on the transplant list awaiting a new kidney and receives daily home dialysis due to kidney failure and also that my partner's mum died from kidney cancer in her 30s, I thought I'd make a post about this day and get us talking about something most of us (including myself before my papa became ill) never really give a second thought about.

My papa's story
Spoiler:
Show


My papa is my grandpa but I call him papa due to that's how we call grandpa's where I come from plus it means dad and he raised me instead of my biological dad, so I see him as nothing less than my dad and much more than just my grandpa.

He has sadly always had bad health. He has has rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, anaemia, angina and a lot of other things for as long as I can remember. In 2009, my papa fell ill with the shingles. It seems to clear up well but a niggling pain on his right side where the shingles rash was remained and a few weeks later, he started having a lot of blood in his urine and felt awful. He was first diagnosed with having an urine infection but after the pain got worse, he ended up at A&E and was seen by a renal consultant and he felt a lump in my papa's flank area and it turned out to be a tumour. He was diagnosed with stage one kidney cancer. Luckily, he only needed surgery and then monitored for 5 years. He didn't have any chemo or radiation.

3 or 4 years on from that, his cancer didn't return but his remaining kidney began to fail due to diabetes and the stress on his body from only having one kidney. He was put on the transplant list and given home dialysis. Me, my mum and gran were tested to see if we were a match but sadly none of us were and he is still on the list. Last year, two matches were found for him but when they opened up the donor, the kidneys were found to be unusable but we're not giving up hope that he may one day get a kidney. As for now, he is just getting over peritonitis and apart from that, he is doing as well as he can be



So lets get started

What do our kidneys do?
The main job of your kidneys is to remove toxins and excess water from your blood. Kidneys also help to control your blood pressure, to produce red blood cells and to keep your bones health. Each roughly the size of your fist, kidneys are located deep in the abdomen, beneath the rib cage.

Your kidneys control blood stream levels of many minerals and molecules including sodium and potassium, and help to control blood acidity. Every day your kidneys carefully control the salt and water in your body so that your blood pressure remains the same.

Some kidney related facts
*In a single hour, kidneys receive around 120 pints of blood
*If the nephrons in both kidneys are taken out and placed end to end horizontally, they will cover a distance of 16 kilometres
*Kidney disease can never be reversed. Its progression can only be slowed down
*Nearly 1.5 million globally go through kidney transplant or kidney dialysis


The 8 golden rules to keeping your kidneys healthy
*Remain as fit and active as possible
*Keep control of your blood sugar levels
*Monitor your blood pressure
*Keep an eye on your weight
*Maintain a healthy fluid intake
*Don't smoke
*Try not to take OTC medication often
*Get your kidney function checked if you are in a high risk group for kidney disease - overweight, diabetic, have a family history of kidney disease, have high blood pressure

What are the most common kidney conditions?
*Chronic Kidney disease
*Kidney cancer
*Kidney infections
*Kidney stones

What is dialysis?
Dialysis is a procedure to remove waste products and excess fluid from the blood when the kidneys stop working properly. It often involves diverting blood to a machine to be cleaned. Some people have to go to hospital a few times a week to get this done but my papa gets to do it at home but has to do it daily. Renal nurses visit him every day to set up his machine for him for the following night and he gets blood taken often. Although he is grateful he gets to do it at home instead of having to go to hospital a lot, he is at risk of complications and regularly suffers from peritonitis as a result of the dialysis.

For more info on kidney health and disease, please follow these links
http://www.worldkidneyday.org/
http://factslegend.org/35-facts-human-kidneys/
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Dialysi...roduction.aspx
http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-dis...y-disease-ckd/
:hugs:

This is a really good thread. There definitely needs to be more awareness on Kidney disease.

I'm sorry about your papa by the way. :hugs:
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username2110825
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Very happy to see this thread; I'm sorry to hear about your family's trouble with it :console:

I don't think people often realise how important the kidneys actually are, so I'm all for awareness being given to them.
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Willy Pete
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My father has suffered from kidney issues since birth as one of them never formed properly, by age 20 he was suffering from Gout which is a truly terrible illness.

And then my brother is a Type 1 diabetic who really sucks at managing it even though he was diagnosed about 15 years ago.

So I have always been very aware of looking after my kidneys as best I can.

Great thread btw.
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Rum Ham
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(Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
:hugs:

This is a really good thread. There definitely needs to be more awareness on Kidney disease.

I'm sorry about your papa by the way. :hugs:
(Original post by SkyRees)
Very happy to see this thread; I'm sorry to hear about your family's trouble with it :console:

I don't think people often realise how important the kidneys actually are, so I'm all for awareness being given to them.
(Original post by Willy Pete)
My father has suffered from kidney issues since birth as one of them never formed properly, by age 20 he was suffering from Gout which is a truly terrible illness.

And then my brother is a Type 1 diabetic who really sucks at managing it even though he was diagnosed about 15 years ago.

So I have always been very aware of looking after my kidneys as best I can.

Great thread btw.
Thanks everyone for taking the time to read the thread and get involved, means a lot to me :hugs:
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Nirvana1989-1994
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(Original post by Spock's Socks)
Thanks everyone for taking the time to read the thread and get involved, means a lot to me :hugs:
:hugs:
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anosmianAcrimony
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Kidneys <3

(not to mix my metaphors)
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