Northern Ireland could face another snap election Watch

Airmed
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1

*Commence major :facepalm:*

Sigh.

The Northern Ireland Secretary, James Brokenshire, warned that there would be "significant consequences" if there is no deal to restore Stormont's devolved government.

The election that took place last week ended the unionist majority at Stormont, and talks are currently being held to get Stormont up and running again between Northern Ireland's political parties and the UK and Irish governments.
Irish Foreign Minister Charlie Flanagan said progress in the discussions had been "slow" but he did "detect a willingness on the part of everybody to do business".

More here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-norther...itics-39218555

For goodness sakes. This is getting ridiculous now.
0
reply
Airmed
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#2
Doonesbury adam9317 DMcGovern That Bearded Man


Please tell me I'm not the only one who finds this ridiculous.
0
reply
GaelicBolshevik
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Airmed)
Doonesbury adam9317 DMcGovern That Bearded Man
Please tell me I'm not the only one who finds this ridiculous.
I say we re-enact the 1916 Rising, Ulster-style.

But that's just me.
0
reply
Airmed
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by DMcGovern)
I say we re-enact the 1916 Rising, Ulster-style.

But that's just me.
What, all nationalists just camp inside Stormont and hope for the best?
0
reply
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Airmed)


*Commence major :facepalm:*


Sigh.

The Northern Ireland Secretary, James Brokenshire, warned that there would be "significant consequences" if there is no deal to restore Stormont's devolved government.

The election that took place last week ended the unionist majority at Stormont, and talks are currently being held to get Stormont up and running again between Northern Ireland's political parties and the UK and Irish governments.
Irish Foreign Minister Charlie Flanagan said progress in the discussions had been "slow" but he did "detect a willingness on the part of everybody to do business".

More here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-norther...itics-39218555

For goodness sakes. This is getting ridiculous now.
I'm not sure ridiculous is the right word, it's entirely as expected, although maybe that says more about how our standards have fallen.

The DUP messages have been totally in the wrong place, the majority publically backing Foster, celebrating getting more votes and talking about defending "their people" from Republicans (that infamous radical agenda of ours) and pointing out how unionists not dominating Stormont is a sign of the apocalypse. This is just so offensive to nationalists who've endured their dominance for so long. Foster can't be seen to be weak and won't step down.

Sinn Fein have a renewed mandate and will be looking to squeeze everything from the DUP, they may well have some issues uncovered by the RHI enquiry, there seem to be some differences between SF and the Dail regarding Troubles issues, SF have (rightly IMO) demanded that Foster go and won't form a government without. They've obliterated PBP and look unfazed by SDLP, doubt they'd be that bothered at all were they to call a re-election.

The UUP will be hurt by the DUP calling them traitors, and no doubt unionists will refocus their votes to the DUP, especially with no Mike leading them.

It was predicted before and it will be predicted again - no government will form.

The irony is that exactly the same will happen this time, SF voters see Foster as the main antagonist and will rally to vote SF to spite her again.

The fear of SF and Gerry Adams, and the declaration that the UUP have betrayed unionists, will rally the unionists to go out and maximise their vote this time around.

I've voted SF my entire life, changing this time to vote Alliance, because I vote for change, I'd have voted UUP 2/3 except that my leaflet asked me to vote for other unionist parties. This is just sickening that we'll be stuck in this endless loop again
1
reply
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
Also, as if we didn't already know that Brokenshire and the Tories (or the UK in general) don't give a **** about Northern Ireland.
1
reply
Airmed
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
That Bearded Man sickening, ridiculous, it's all just frustrating.
0
reply
GaelicBolshevik
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Airmed)
What, all nationalists just camp inside Stormont and hope for the best?
Tut tut, did you not see the Ulster style bit? I say we lock Arlene in the toilet and pass the Irish Language Act while she's in there
0
reply
Airmed
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by DMcGovern)
Tut tut, did you not see the Ulster style bit? I say we lock Arlene in the toilet and pass the Irish Language Act while she's in there
You might have to lock a few more others in. Like Jim boy from the TUV
1
reply
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Airmed)
That Bearded Man sickening, ridiculous, it's all just frustrating.
I just don't understand the pettiness. It's like when Lana Del Rey led a witchcraft attack against Donald Trump, you have to wonder about the people who take it seriously, on either side.

I just despise how unionism and nationalism are still the defining characteristics of parties, as if should SF win more seats, a united Ireland is imminent. That people care so much about language, anthems, flags, names. It's utterly pathetic.
0
reply
GaelicBolshevik
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
I'm not sure ridiculous is the right word, it's entirely as expected, although maybe that says more about how our standards have fallen.

The DUP messages have been totally in the wrong place, the majority publically backing Foster, celebrating getting more votes and talking about defending "their people" from Republicans (that infamous radical agenda of ours) and pointing out how unionists not dominating Stormont is a sign of the apocalypse. This is just so offensive to nationalists who've endured their dominance for so long. Foster can't be seen to be weak and won't step down.

Sinn Fein have a renewed mandate and will be looking to squeeze everything from the DUP, they may well have some issues uncovered by the RHI enquiry, there seem to be some differences between SF and the Dail regarding Troubles issues, SF have (rightly IMO) demanded that Foster go and won't form a government without. They've obliterated PBP and look unfazed by SDLP, doubt they'd be that bothered at all were they to call a re-election.

The UUP will be hurt by the DUP calling them traitors, and no doubt unionists will refocus their votes to the DUP, especially with no Mike leading them.

It was predicted before and it will be predicted again - no government will form.

The irony is that exactly the same will happen this time, SF voters see Foster as the main antagonist and will rally to vote SF to spite her again.

The fear of SF and Gerry Adams, and the declaration that the UUP have betrayed unionists, will rally the unionists to go out and maximise their vote this time around.

I've voted SF my entire life, changing this time to vote Alliance, because I vote for change, I'd have voted UUP 2/3 except that my leaflet asked me to vote for other unionist parties. This is just sickening that we'll be stuck in this endless loop again
On a serious note, I agree. It's infuriating but expected. We'll never get anything done within this system. The statelet's boundaries were drawn with the specific intention of a unionist majority, and that's most probably how it's going to stay, especially with the hysteria spread by the DUP about Sinn Féin. It's depressing how many people actually vote DUP despite their sheer stupidity.

Alliance are actually fairly electable now, weirdly. Naomi Long's really turned them around, they used to just be there to make up numbers.
0
reply
L i b
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Also, as if we didn't already know that Brokenshire and the Tories (or the UK in general) don't give a **** about Northern Ireland.
What do you expect him to do, other than effectively prepare for direct rule as a fallback and use whatever influence he has to bring people to the table?

Power-sharing is a horrendous model to follow in a democracy, but it's a model chosen, designed and committed to in Northern Ireland. It's really down to the politicians in Northern Ireland to make it work, or get around a table and work out some other constitutional arrangement that is acceptable to them.

For my part, I think if you're going to suggest that power-sharing is viable, then parties have to be willing to hold their nose and do what they don't want to do. There have been incredible examples of that in Northern Ireland, but no shortage of times where the spirit seems to be in short supply.
0
reply
L i b
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by DMcGovern)
It's depressing how many people actually vote DUP despite their sheer stupidity.
That's what happens when politics turns into a nationalistic pissing contest - the party who wins elections isn't the one with the best policies, but rather the one that seems to be best at waving the flag.
0
reply
adam9317
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by Airmed)
Doonesbury adam9317 DMcGovern That Bearded Man


Please tell me I'm not the only one who finds this ridiculous.
I don't think I have the energy for another election!
0
reply
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by L i b)
What do you expect him to do, other than effectively prepare for direct rule as a fallback and use whatever influence he has to bring people to the table?

Power-sharing is a horrendous model to follow in a democracy, but it's a model chosen, designed and committed to in Northern Ireland. It's really down to the politicians in Northern Ireland to make it work, or get around a table and work out some other constitutional arrangement that is acceptable to them.

For my part, I think if you're going to suggest that power-sharing is viable, then parties have to be willing to hold their nose and do what they don't want to do. There have been incredible examples of that in Northern Ireland, but no shortage of times where the spirit seems to be in short supply.
Well, either he washes his hands totally, or he interferes to either require Foster to step aside and order an inquiry or tell SF that they must abandon that pledge. He hasn't done this and has shown a lack of interest in this. Not that I necessarily blame him, just that we shouldn't expect him to do us any favours.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Owain5
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by Airmed)


*Commence major :facepalm:*


Sigh.

The Northern Ireland Secretary, James Brokenshire, warned that there would be "significant consequences" if there is no deal to restore Stormont's devolved government.

The election that took place last week ended the unionist majority at Stormont, and talks are currently being held to get Stormont up and running again between Northern Ireland's political parties and the UK and Irish governments.
Irish Foreign Minister Charlie Flanagan said progress in the discussions had been "slow" but he did "detect a willingness on the part of everybody to do business".

More here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-norther...itics-39218555

For goodness sakes. This is getting ridiculous now.
I hope you get independence from the UK (coming from a British person)

Because it'd be better for you. Be your own country, and anyway how much does westminster care about NI? Better for them to take independence and to work with the Republic of Ireland
1
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
I just don't understand the pettiness. It's like when Lana Del Rey led a witchcraft attack against Donald Trump, you have to wonder about the people who take it seriously, on either side.

I just despise how unionism and nationalism are still the defining characteristics of parties, as if should SF win more seats, a united Ireland is imminent. That people care so much about language, anthems, flags, names. It's utterly pathetic.
This is true but its fear of the other that drives the sentiment and is fueled by policy and also the history of the parties (ties to terrorism), it would in many ways be easier had the old parties being replaced.

Even i (somebody who cares about the economy far more than nationalism) could never allow Sinn Fein to gain power were i in NI simply because their history is one of division and deceit. One could never trust that they were motivated by prosperity for the masses over subverting the union and fostering a separate culture. Likewise, you have otherwise sane people like Airmed on the other side who vote for such a party at the expense of her otherwise centrist/liberal views.
0
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by Owain5)
I hope you get independence from the UK (coming from a British person)

Because it'd be better for you. Be your own country, and anyway how much does westminster care about NI? Better for them to take independence and to work with the Republic of Ireland
This is awful. Though you may not care for NI yourself (and politically i agree) our union is based on a shared history, values and blood. The whole United Kingdom is far greater than the sum of its parts and to even lose NI would be a great crime.
0
reply
mojojojo101
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by L i b)
What do you expect him to do, other than effectively prepare for direct rule as a fallback and use whatever influence he has to bring people to the table?

Power-sharing is a horrendous model to follow in a democracy, but it's a model chosen, designed and committed to in Northern Ireland. It's really down to the politicians in Northern Ireland to make it work, or get around a table and work out some other constitutional arrangement that is acceptable to them.

For my part, I think if you're going to suggest that power-sharing is viable, then parties have to be willing to hold their nose and do what they don't want to do. There have been incredible examples of that in Northern Ireland, but no shortage of times where the spirit seems to be in short supply.
I'm not massively familiar with Northern Irish politics, but isn't any whiff of direct rule from Westminster basically throwing petrol on the smoldering coals of Irish Rebulicanism???
0
reply
L i b
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report 2 years ago
#20
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Well, either he washes his hands totally, or he interferes to either require Foster to step aside and order an inquiry or tell SF that they must abandon that pledge. He hasn't done this and has shown a lack of interest in this. Not that I necessarily blame him, just that we shouldn't expect him to do us any favours.
Well, I'd argue it's not his job to fix the issues - simply to facilitate the politicians in Northern Ireland working things out themselves. It's not really for him to dictate party positions, and I doubt either the DUP or SF would take orders from him at the best of times.

External influence has helped Northern Ireland on many occasions - but it didn't build progress by delivering instruction to locally elected politicians.

(Original post by Owain5)
I hope you get independence from the UK (coming from a British person)

Because it'd be better for you. Be your own country, and anyway how much does westminster care about NI?
I suspect the UK Parliament is as interested in NI as any other part of the UK. MPs tend to be interested in their local areas, and magnificently we have a fairly similar proportion of MPs representing similar sized groups of people - including those from Northern Ireland.

But of course, that's not to mention that Northern Ireland would struggle to afford its current level of public services, not to mention security, without being part of the UK.

(Original post by mojojojo101)
I'm not massively familiar with Northern Irish politics, but isn't any whiff of direct rule from Westminster basically throwing petrol on the smoldering coals of Irish Rebulicanism???
I don't think anyone is seriously suggesting direct rule is a great outcome. Devolution is a significant part of the peace process. But it is the only reasonable fall-back if the Northern Ireland Executive cannot function. I'm sure people of all political colours appreciate that ultimately there is a need for functioning government.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Biology Paper 3 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (283)
15.21%
The paper was reasonable (1035)
55.62%
Not feeling great about that exam... (403)
21.66%
It was TERRIBLE (140)
7.52%

Watched Threads

View All