Junior Doctor Strike - Medicine interview Watch

Rukia12
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How should I answer a question like:
1. Would you have gone on strike?

Do I give a yes/no?
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StationToStation
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You should give a definitive answer because they ask for one, yes, but not before telling them why. You should start by giving a few arguments for and against striking. Obviously this is a huge topic but some examples include
+ contracts could affect patient safety negatively in the long run
- striking could affect patient safety in the short term (although depending on who strikes - e.g. A&E shutting down vs pushing some non-urgent consultations to later in the week)
+ contracts not fair to junior doctors and they should have the right to protest just as any other profession
- striking could affect negatively the public's perception of doctors, e.g. "they're just in it for the money" or whatever
And so on, you get the point. After you've listed some pros and cons you need to briefly tell them what you choose and why. Personally I might say something like "even though striking would have some negative consequences in the short term, I think it would be a price worth paying for the long term benefits so I would probably strike".
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walkonby
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(Original post by Rukia12)
How should I answer a question like:
1. Would you have gone on strike?

Do I give a yes/no?
Is this a uni interview? I didn't think they asked political questions at those kinds of interviews
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Rukia12
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(Original post by walkonby)
Is this a uni interview? I didn't think they asked political questions at those kinds of interviews
Yeah I'm prepping and it was one the possible questions
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Rukia12
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(Original post by StationToStation)
You should give a definitive answer because they ask for one, yes, but not before telling them why. You should start by giving a few arguments for and against striking. Obviously this is a huge topic but some examples include
+ contracts could affect patient safety negatively in the long run
- striking could affect patient safety in the short term (although depending on who strikes - e.g. A&E shutting down vs pushing some non-urgent consultations to later in the week)
+ contracts not fair to junior doctors and they should have the right to protest just as any other profession
- striking could affect negatively the public's perception of doctors, e.g. "they're just in it for the money" or whatever
And so on, you get the point. After you've listed some pros and cons you need to briefly tell them what you choose and why. Personally I might say something like "even though striking would have some negative consequences in the short term, I think it would be a price worth paying for the long term benefits so I would probably strike".
I see so make it kind of as a last resort option.
Thank you very much! This really helped!
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Rukia12
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(Original post by StationToStation)
You should give a definitive answer because they ask for one, yes, but not before telling them why. You should start by giving a few arguments for and against striking. Obviously this is a huge topic but some examples include
+ contracts could affect patient safety negatively in the long run
- striking could affect patient safety in the short term (although depending on who strikes - e.g. A&E shutting down vs pushing some non-urgent consultations to later in the week)
+ contracts not fair to junior doctors and they should have the right to protest just as any other profession
- striking could affect negatively the public's perception of doctors, e.g. "they're just in it for the money" or whatever
And so on, you get the point. After you've listed some pros and cons you need to briefly tell them what you choose and why. Personally I might say something like "even though striking would have some negative consequences in the short term, I think it would be a price worth paying for the long term benefits so I would probably strike".
A quick question how would the contracts affect patient safety negatively in the long run?
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walkonby
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(Original post by Rukia12)
Yeah I'm prepping and it was one the possible questions
Man I can't believe they're allowed to ask you that!!

The other user is right though, don't give them a definitive answer, usually people if people support strikes or union activity in their profession they tend to be pretty quiet about it (unless they're actively involved) and with good reason... however I don't think they're legally allowed to discriminate against your application if you support the right to unionise or not
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6med
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If this is for an interview at a UK medical school, it is highly unlikely that they would ask you the question ‘would you go on strike?’ When it comes to highly controversial political and ethical issues, it would be unfair and is therefore almost unheard of for them to ask you to come down strongly on one side or the other.

What is much more likely is that they ask you to demonstrate an awareness of an issue and encourage you to weigh up arguments on both sides. For example with the question ‘why have junior doctors been striking in recent times?’ They will not ask your opinion on such an issue and you should not volunteer it.

Hope that helps,

Alex, 4th year UCL medic
6med
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StationToStation
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(Original post by Rukia12)
A quick question how would the contracts affect patient safety negatively in the long run?
Some people feel that by e.g. pushing already overworked doctors to work even longer and more antisocial hours, the contract would make the existing doctors more exhausted and unhappy, and hence less able to provide patients the standard of care they provide now. It might also push more doctors to leave the NHS to work abroad or in the private sector.
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Rukia12
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(Original post by walkonby)
Man I can't believe they're allowed to ask you that!!

The other user is right though, don't give them a definitive answer, usually people if people support strikes or union activity in their profession they tend to be pretty quiet about it (unless they're actively involved) and with good reason... however I don't think they're legally allowed to discriminate against your application if you support the right to unionise or not

(Original post by 6med)
If this is for an interview at a UK medical school, it is highly unlikely that they would ask you the question ‘would you go on strike?’ When it comes to highly controversial political and ethical issues, it would be unfair and is therefore almost unheard of for them to ask you to come down strongly on one side or the other.

What is much more likely is that they ask you to demonstrate an awareness of an issue and encourage you to weigh up arguments on both sides. For example with the question ‘why have junior doctors been striking in recent times?’ They will not ask your opinion on such an issue and you should not volunteer it.

Hope that helps,

Alex, 4th year UCL medic
6med

Okay I see. I will prepare the answer just in case, but it involves weighing up the pros and cons anyway and hopefully I can answer just it that.
Thank you very much for the help!
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Rukia12
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(Original post by StationToStation)
Some people feel that by e.g. pushing already overworked doctors to work even longer and more antisocial hours, the contract would make the existing doctors more exhausted and unhappy, and hence less able to provide patients the standard of care they provide now. It might also push more doctors to leave the NHS to work abroad or in the private sector.
Oh okay, that is a very good point. Thank you again!
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StationToStation
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(Original post by Rukia12)
Oh okay, that is a very good point. Thank you again!
No problem, good luck with the interview!
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Chief Wiggum
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I think that would be a bit of an unfair question. It is very political.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by StationToStation)
Some people feel that by e.g. pushing already overworked doctors to work even longer and more antisocial hours, the contract would make the existing doctors more exhausted and unhappy, and hence less able to provide patients the standard of care they provide now. It might also push more doctors to leave the NHS to work abroad or in the private sector.
Although of course plenty of people complain that the European Working Time Directive negatively affected training of doctors, by introducing restrictions on the number of hours doctors can work. :p:

The medical profession is a tricky group to please!
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Gerry-Atricks
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i literally got asked this at my UCL interview a week ago, the BMAT question was should doctors have the right to strike and i was asked basically if i would go out and strike with them so definitely prepare for it
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StationToStation
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(Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
i literally got asked this at my UCL interview a week ago, the BMAT question was should doctors have the right to strike and i was asked basically if i would go out and strike with them so definitely prepare for it
Out of curiosity, what kind of answer did you give? Did you give them a yes/no or try to avoid a conclusion?
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by StationToStation)
Out of curiosity, what kind of answer did you give? Did you give them a yes/no or try to avoid a conclusion?
I said I appreciated the reasoning behind the strike( changes to junior doctor contract meant extension of standard time by 30 hours, removal of vital safeguards, reduction in actual pay) however I think that by becoming a doctor you take an oath to preserve life and put patient safety first and striking violates this and the medical ethical principles of non maleficence and benifecence as they're not doing good on strike and not preventin harm so I said I personally wouldn't go out with them
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CookieButter
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
The medical profession is a tricky group to please!
It never used to be like this before the introduction of quotas for women in medical schools. Women are now becoming the majority of the profession of doctors and this is now starting to cause problems for our society. Women want a 'work/life' balance. They want longer hours off work to have and look after children. They are not biologically compatible for working 'longer hours'. We are now starting to pay the price for these quotas, these feminist polices of pushing women into roles that do not conform with their biological reality.

Asking a profession entirely made up of men to work longer hours is not like asking a profession made up of mostly women to work longer hours....the latter will go on strike.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by CookieButter)
It never used to be like this before the introduction of quotas for women in medical schools. Women are now becoming the majority of the profession of doctors and this is now starting to cause problems for our society. Women want a 'work/life' balance. They want longer hours off work to have and look after children. They are not biologically compatible for working 'longer hours'. We are now starting to pay the price for these quotas, these feminist polices of pushing women into roles that do not conform with their biological reality.

Asking a profession entirely made up of men to work longer hours is not like asking a profession made up of mostly women to work longer hours....the latter will go on strike.
I don't think there are quotas for women in medical schools. I assume more women in medical schools now is due to more women being interested in it and applying. I guess there is some political pressure though, eg "Athena SWAN", "Women in Surgery" etc.

I'm not sure the recent strikes have a significant amount to do with the changing gender balance of the profession. Although there was an element of it, due to the fact the women are more likely to want less than full time training, and to take time out of programme for family reasons. That will have implications for the medical workforce, which I think is a separate issue to the recent strikes. I don't think it is fair to say that women are incompatible with working longer hours!

But I would say having a good work life balance is probably a healthy thing to have regardless of gender!
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CookieButter
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
I don't think there are quotas for women in medical schools. I assume more women in medical schools now is due to more women being interested in it and applying. I guess there is some political pressure though, eg "Athena SWAN", "Women in Surgery" etc.

I'm not sure the recent strikes have a significant amount to do with the changing gender balance of the profession. Although there was an element of it, due to the fact the women are more likely to want less than full time training, and to take time out of programme for family reasons. That will have implications for the medical workforce, which I think is a separate issue to the recent strikes. I don't think it is fair to say that women are incompatible with working longer hours!

But I would say having a good work life balance is probably a healthy thing to have regardless of gender!
I'm not familiar with the history of this issue but medical schools where forced to increase their intake of girls and this is what lead to women overtaking men in medicine. Apparently, there is government legislation to this affect...Dr. Vernon Coleman, a former GP, refers to this issue in his book "Diary of a Disgruntled Man". This is what he had to say:

"There is talk of British companies being forced to have more female directors – whether or not they can find any decent ones. This is a really bad idea. Quotas are always bad. This sort of positive discrimination is sexist and will produce the same
sort of disaster that was created when medical schools were forced to increase their intake of female students. Many of the problems with medical care today stem from this absurd piece of legislation. There were never enough good girl applicants and so medical schools started taking the dregs in order to fill their quotas.

And, today, many female doctors want to work part-time. They don’t have the sense of commitment of male doctors. They expect to be home for tea at 5 p.m. and they don’t want to work weekends or nights. They want long periods off to have babies. And they don’t have the same sense of dedication that has always been a tradition in medicine.

Incidentally, it does strike me as rather odd that while medical schools are forced to take in more female students so that there will eventually be equal numbers of female and male doctors there is no pressure on nursing schools to take in vastly more male students. And, as an afterthought, what will be next? Quotas for the army so that we have as many female soldiers as male soldiers? Probably. And what about transsexuals and transvestites? If there are going to be quotas for women then there should also be quotas for transsexuals and transvestites. And quotas for one-legged albinos with hearing problems."

Really nice article by the daily telegraph about the impact that the increase of female doctors has had on healthcare in the UK:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/heal...in-crisis.html
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