Turn on thread page Beta

English terminology watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What's the difference between an oxymoron, the use of juxtaposition and antithesis? Is there any more subject specific terminology i should know of concerning putting together two concepts with contrasting meanings? To be honest, I'm not really even all that sure if they're not just synonyms. I'm not sure.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laura03099)
    What's the difference between an oxymoron, the use of juxtaposition and antithesis? Is there any more subject specific terminology i should know of concerning putting together two concepts with contrasting meanings? To be honest, I'm not really even all that sure if they're not just synonyms. I'm not sure.
    Oxymorons- Oxymorons are when you have two contradictory ideas appear in the same sentence. Shakespeare is famous for using oxymorons in his plays. For example, in Macbeth when the witches say 'fair is foul and foul is fair.' It is a oxymoron because the witches have just contradicted their selves in the same sentence by saying the opposite thing to each other. Just remember that an oxymoron will always be contradictory.

    Juxtaposition- Juxtaposition is slightly different to Oxymoron. Whilst Oxymorons put two contradictory ideas in the same sentence, Juxtaposition puts two ideas together to make contrast between the two. Some authors sometimes use juxtaposition to bring out a strong characteristic in another character. So for example, in Of Mice and Men the two main characters Lenny and George are described one after another. Lenny is a big guy but he is slow. George is small but he is described as being quite sharp. George's smallness and sharp intelligence helps draw more attention to Lenny's strength and simplistic mind.

    Antithesis- Antithesis is a tricky terminology to understand as it has more than one meaning and both are often used in English literature. The first meaning is probably the one you are expected to know. Antithesis is basically putting two opposite concepts/ideas within a sentence to create a contrast. It is very similar to juxtaposition but different. Juxtaposition does not always have to be two different ideas being contrasted. Juxtaposition can be two similar ideas being contrasted for the reader to note subtle differences.

    Oxymoron is a special type of antithesis as the contrasting ideas immediately follow from each other. Authors may use antithesis to make a character's mindset clear to us or to set up an argument. Again, Shakespeare uses this a lot as well. Example: 'To be, or not to be, that is the question-
    Whether tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
    or to take arms against a sea of troubles
    and by opposing, end them?'

    The first line is a oxymoron because Hamlet has said two opposite things immediately after each other ('to be, or not to be'). The next three lines 'whether tis nobler in the mind to suffer..etc' you would call antithesis as it is not a oxymoron because the opposite ideas are not within the same line. The antithesis lies in Hamlet contrasting whether it would be more nobler to let himself die according to fate or to fight against death and oppose fate.

    Hope that has helped.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: March 10, 2017

University open days

  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Sat, 20 Oct '18
  • University of Sheffield
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Sat, 20 Oct '18
  • Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 20 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.