Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    I wasn't judging anyone, I was merely saying that if when I collected my A-Level results 3 years ago, and it read all E's, I would consider it an complete and utter failure. Yes, some people would consider EEE an achievement, and good for them, but for me it wouldn't be.
    Yeah i was pissed off at my 2 EE's but the B and C helped get over it, but its not the end, i was speaking to an old school friend who resat his a-levels and has now gone onto the second year of uni. if it takes another few years it takes another few years.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarky)
    Hey i'm a mod on a board and i hope if i was arrogant that people would give me a virtual kick up the a*se to bring me back down to earth.
    *Gives Edders a virtual kick up the arse*

    *Awaits Edders to censor the word arse from this post*
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    but the suitability for an academic university course.
    as well as being able to discriminate academically between candidates...
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jools)
    *Gives Edders a virtual kick up the arse*

    *Awaits Edders to censor the word arse from this post*
    Lol, thanks Jools i appreciate the support.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jools)
    *Gives Edders a virtual kick up the arse*

    *Awaits Edders to censor the word arse from this post*
    Did anyone even read my post? :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    But the point of A'Levels is not to judge intelligence (did I ever suggest they were?) but the suitability for an academic university course.
    I don't know, did you? thought you were the smart one ere

    I'm just saying that the way of learning at uni is a world apart from a-levels so becouse you might not do well at a-levels doesn't mean you won't do well at uni. its just so different.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Did anyone even read my post? :rolleyes:

    No we're not clever enough too
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Did anyone even read my post? :rolleyes:
    Which one? The one about you letting people off doing "badly" in their A levels because they were ill? Or the one about you thinking that 2E's would show that a candiate was lazy?

    So much quality in your posts its hard to tell the difference :rolleyes: .
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarky)
    Which one? The one about you letting people off doing "badly" in their A levels because they were ill? Or the one about you thinking that 2E's would show that a candiate was lazy?

    So much quality in your posts its hard to tell the difference :rolleyes: .
    Well, the point about laziness is broadly right, actually. I don't know why you find that so hard to accept.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vladek)
    ...becouse you might not do well at a-levels doesn't mean you won't do well at uni. its just so different.
    Actually there's a strong correlation between A'Level grades and final degree outcome.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Well, the point about laziness is broadly right, actually. I don't know why you find that so hard to accept.
    Yeah i'll give you that one I didn't apply myself as much as i should of at a-levels or GCSEs, i was happy just cruising through, its just not possible to do that at uni though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Actually there's a strong correlation between A'Level grades and final degree outcome.
    I should of failed my degree then
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Well, the point about laziness is broadly right, actually. I don't know why you find that so hard to accept.

    I am many things. But i'm definitely not lazy. You don't go to sixth form 5 days a week as well as working 3 days a week and commuting from london to nottingham every weekend if you are lazy.

    Not that i really care what you think. My real concern is that other people with similar grades will be made to feel inferior which just isn't on.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vladek)
    I should of failed my degree then
    Well, there are exceptions to what is a general rule.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Did anyone even read my post? :rolleyes:
    In seriousness I agree that a lot of people who get Es are either lazy and/or not good enough to be doing AS/A2 levels, and would be much better off going down a path of vocational qualifications, or even a job straight from GCSEs - you can start immediately on almost £15,000 at Bank of England after GCSEs for example. Your flaw is tarring everyone with the same brush:
    (Original post by edders)
    People who get E's at A'Level shouldn't be allowed to take them. They're bone idle if they get grades that low!
    Even if that was in jest, you're calling a lot of people who worked incredibly hard and survived serious problems "bone idle".
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Actually there's a strong correlation between A'Level grades and final degree outcome.
    "Choosing a suitable candidate for university based on their A-Level grades is about as accurate as tossing a coin" - Vice Chancellor, Kings College London
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarky)

    I am many things. But i'm definitely not lazy. You don't go to sixth form 5 days a week as well as working 3 days a week and commuting from london to nottingham every weekend if you are lazy.

    Not that i really care what you think. My real concern is that other people with similar grades will be made to feel inferior which just isn't on.
    Well, they are inferior: academically anyway. A'Levels test academic skill, ergo if you get EE you have poor academic skills. Of course there are exceptions (like if you're ill, or don't have enough time to commit to study for some reason), but most failure is down to unsuitability for the course and a lack of effort. I worked my guts out for two years to get a good result at the end of the day, in face of the obstacles that the average A'Level student has to deal with, so I'm not going to have a huge amount of sympathy for A'Level failures.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarky)
    Of course there are people out there that do nothing for 2 years and deserve to get grades that show this, but that isn't always the case and i don't think anyone has the right to judge anyone else on something like this.
    While not meaning to judge anyone, whether E's are worth anything depends on what you want from life.

    If you want to go to Oxbridge or Harvard then they are worthless, as the university would not consider your application favourably.

    If you just want a solid career, then they may not be as useful as people assume initially, as they will have cost you 2 years experience, that you would have otherwise earnt, as well as the financial pressure from not earning.

    To some, though they are essential. A friend of mines ambition is to be a professional Trombone player. He currently studies at the Guildhall School of Music in London. To get onto that course you needed EE (and to pass a series of rigourous auditions)

    If you simply wish to do as well as you can academically, then they would be a blow if you were expecting higher grades, but might open up HNC/HND courses which can then be converted to an honours degree. For some people A-levels are completely unrelated to any skills they need either in higher-education or in life in general, yet are a hurdle to be crossed.

    Where the crunch point comes in, is did you achieve those results as a true demonstration of your knowledge/intelligence etc, or was the structure of the A-Level a problem in itself. Employers and Higher Education institutions would look more favourably on a solid performance in a foundation year, or AVCEs than scraping a pass at A-Level.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Well, they are inferior: academically anyway. A'Levels test academic skill, ergo if you get EE you have poor academic skills. Of course there are exceptions (like if you're ill, or don't have enough time to commit to study for some reason), but most failure is down to unsuitability for the course and a lack of effort. I worked my guts out for two years to get a good result at the end of the day, in face of the obstacles that the average A'Level student has to deal with, so I'm not going to have a huge amount of sympathy for A'Level failures.
    Oi an E isn't a fail, its still an A-level.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jools)
    In seriousness I agree that a lot of people who get Es are either lazy and/or not good enough to be doing AS/A2 levels, and would be much better off going down a path of vocational qualifications,
    why so? when the current system allows someone to get a university degree (in an "vocational" subject) with minimum offers of EEE. surely it's a fault of the system and not the individual for having such options available?
 
 
 
Poll
Were you ever put in isolation at school?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.