Shaziye
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I need help in analysing this poem, especially on the voice. My teacher hasn't taught me anything and this piece of work is due tomorrow.

Who’ll know then, when they walk by the grave

where your bones will be brittle things – this bone here

that swoops away from your throat, and this,

which perfectly fits the scoop of my palm, and these

which I count with my lips, and your skull,

which blooms on the pillow now, and your fingers,

beautiful in their little rings – that love, which wanders history,

singled you out in your time?

Love loved you best; lit you

with a flame, like talent, under your skin; let you

move through your days and nights, blessed in your flesh,

blood, hair, as though they were lovely garments

you wore to pleasure the air. Who’ll guess, if they read

you stone, or press their thumbs to the scars

of your dates, that were I alive, I would lie on the grass

above your bones till I mirrored your pose, your infinite grace?
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FaZe Clan
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Youre lucky i did this poem for just a short warm up homework last year on the computer:
The poem, Elegy by Carol Ann Duffy, is presented in the first person singular – addressing the loved on (you) – but used three times, and ‘you’ appears six times –indicating the preoccupation of the speaker. Form wise, Elegy is a fourteen lines poem, with an irregular rhyming scheme – suggesting a relationship with a sonnet (a traditional form for love poetry) but with a modern take on it. The final couplets echo the resolution of the sonnet, with a shift into the present tense and to the physical presence of the loved one.
The poem, Elegy, has irregular rhyming scheme (“skin”, “in” and half rhyme of “routine”, for example), and internal half rhymes (“gaze” and “face”) and internal full rhymes (“shapes” and “gapes”) – which create a sense of the confusion between internal and external worlds. The repeated “ll” draws attention to the connections between “spell”, “kill”, “hell” etc. – the destructive nature of love, while the sibilance of “soft salt sound” etc. echo the muffled nature of half-wakening.
The figurative use of Language has been indicated through the language of spells, fire and tiger – which indicate a vulnerability of the speaker in the face of this powerful love. The imagery of the “long grass” provides a link between imagination and reality – linking back to the tiger. Finally, the loved one is a touchable dream – the melding of imagination and reality.




The word ‘elegy’ refers to a poem of serious reflection, or more importantly a lament for the dead. In this case, the elegy is for Duffy’s lover that was lost to death, and her reactions and reflections on this. To begin, the bones are described as ‘brittle’, as though her lover was fragile, even precious to her, although fragile things are easily broken. Duffy then describes how beautiful the fingers are in their ‘little rings’, which could be a reference to a couple of things.
Firstly rings could mean wedding rings, suggesting either they were engaged or married before the tragedy, which is a tragedy in itself that this union was broken by such circumstances.
Secondly, it could be a reference to how the rings of a tree can tell its age, suggesting that the rings of their finger shows the years of their relationship within them. Aside from this, in the second, Duffy also uses much positive, yet physical imagery to describe the traits of her lover. The metaphor ‘blessed in your flesh, blood and hair, as though they were lovely garments’ seems to show her gratefulness for the closeness the two experienced, to the point as though they were connected as one being. Also, the very presence of her lover seemed to ‘pleasure the air’, which also seems to lift the melancholy air the poem holds. All this physical imagery could be linked to how Duffy feels they have such a close connection in their relationship.
‘Till I mirrored your pose’ links back to the earlier quote ‘perfectly fits the scoop of my palm’, suggesting how perfect of a match Duffy and her lover were in life, and in the former’s context showing her desire to match that again. Among all this, Duffy also feels her lover was ‘singled out’ by ‘that love, which wanders history’, as though they were a miracle or a random, rare chance, so that their love was unique and nothing can compare. However, the poem begins to slip back into its melancholy tone, as Duffy begins to contemplate on how their love may never be known by others.
For example, though their passion is lit with a ‘flame, like talent’ however this passion is ‘under your skin,’ which implies that their love between them was hidden. The tombstone becomes significant to this point as well as it mentions ‘who’ll guess’ the meaning behind the ‘scars of your dates’, never knowing the love they were a part of.
Lastly, Duffy finishes with ‘your infinite grace’, offering us that even in death, her lover will still remain the beautiful wonder that they were in life.
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Shaziye
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(Original post by FaZe Clan)
Youre lucky i did this poem for just a short warm up homework last year on the computer:
The poem, Elegy by Carol Ann Duffy, is presented in the first person singular – addressing the loved on (you) – but used three times, and ‘you’ appears six times –indicating the preoccupation of the speaker. Form wise, Elegy is a fourteen lines poem, with an irregular rhyming scheme – suggesting a relationship with a sonnet (a traditional form for love poetry) but with a modern take on it. The final couplets echo the resolution of the sonnet, with a shift into the present tense and to the physical presence of the loved one.
The poem, Elegy, has irregular rhyming scheme (“skin”, “in” and half rhyme of “routine”, for example), and internal half rhymes (“gaze” and “face”) and internal full rhymes (“shapes” and “gapes”) – which create a sense of the confusion between internal and external worlds. The repeated “ll” draws attention to the connections between “spell”, “kill”, “hell” etc. – the destructive nature of love, while the sibilance of “soft salt sound” etc. echo the muffled nature of half-wakening.
The figurative use of Language has been indicated through the language of spells, fire and tiger – which indicate a vulnerability of the speaker in the face of this powerful love. The imagery of the “long grass” provides a link between imagination and reality – linking back to the tiger. Finally, the loved one is a touchable dream – the melding of imagination and reality.




The word ‘elegy’ refers to a poem of serious reflection, or more importantly a lament for the dead. In this case, the elegy is for Duffy’s lover that was lost to death, and her reactions and reflections on this. To begin, the bones are described as ‘brittle’, as though her lover was fragile, even precious to her, although fragile things are easily broken. Duffy then describes how beautiful the fingers are in their ‘little rings’, which could be a reference to a couple of things.
Firstly rings could mean wedding rings, suggesting either they were engaged or married before the tragedy, which is a tragedy in itself that this union was broken by such circumstances.
Secondly, it could be a reference to how the rings of a tree can tell its age, suggesting that the rings of their finger shows the years of their relationship within them. Aside from this, in the second, Duffy also uses much positive, yet physical imagery to describe the traits of her lover. The metaphor ‘blessed in your flesh, blood and hair, as though they were lovely garments’ seems to show her gratefulness for the closeness the two experienced, to the point as though they were connected as one being. Also, the very presence of her lover seemed to ‘pleasure the air’, which also seems to lift the melancholy air the poem holds. All this physical imagery could be linked to how Duffy feels they have such a close connection in their relationship.
‘Till I mirrored your pose’ links back to the earlier quote ‘perfectly fits the scoop of my palm’, suggesting how perfect of a match Duffy and her lover were in life, and in the former’s context showing her desire to match that again. Among all this, Duffy also feels her lover was ‘singled out’ by ‘that love, which wanders history’, as though they were a miracle or a random, rare chance, so that their love was unique and nothing can compare. However, the poem begins to slip back into its melancholy tone, as Duffy begins to contemplate on how their love may never be known by others.
For example, though their passion is lit with a ‘flame, like talent’ however this passion is ‘under your skin,’ which implies that their love between them was hidden. The tombstone becomes significant to this point as well as it mentions ‘who’ll guess’ the meaning behind the ‘scars of your dates’, never knowing the love they were a part of.
Lastly, Duffy finishes with ‘your infinite grace’, offering us that even in death, her lover will still remain the beautiful wonder that they were in life.
thank you so much, i really appreciate it
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