soysox
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi,
All the teachers in my sociology department say different things for what this AQA A level sociology exam wants, and although I understand that it's a new mark scheme, it's very stressful!!
I was told the other day by the head of department that the ONLY way you could get above a B and into the A/A* grade is if you use modern day examples for the argumements/theories you are presenting, which are not in the textbook and you have to find yourself such as in online articles/newspapers/ and so on.
I am already struggling trying to memorise ALL the content and I do not think this is worth pursuing unless its actually real!
So, do any of your teachers say the same thing? Or is he just wrong? Help.
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LenniesRabbit
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#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by soysox)
Hi,
All the teachers in my sociology department say different things for what this AQA A level sociology exam wants, and although I understand that it's a new mark scheme, it's very stressful!!
I was told the other day by the head of department that the ONLY way you could get above a B and into the A/A* grade is if you use modern day examples for the argumements/theories you are presenting, which are not in the textbook and you have to find yourself such as in online articles/newspapers/ and so on.
I am already struggling trying to memorise ALL the content and I do not think this is worth pursuing unless its actually real!
So, do any of your teachers say the same thing? Or is he just wrong? Help.
Hi, don't worry we were told the same thing. It's true but not in the way that your teachers explain it. xD
What you need is to be able to give an up-to-date argument. So obviously you will consider the views of past feminist sociologists e.g. Ansley (1972) who just believe women soak up mens anger and frustration and therefore women's position in society is not improving, but then you should be able to say that Liberal feminists do see women's position as changing e.g. through 2017 Women's Protests. Sex Discrimination Act changes and recent investigations into unequal pay between men and women.

Overall though, modern day examples should be used as examples to back up your point. Using recent Conservative party policies or feminist protests/ media investigations / educational changes or for demography use up-to-date statistics from like... last month. Thats basically what they mean But overall don't put too much emphasis on researching for it. These should just be things you've heard in the news or something that you've overheard people talking about in public!

Any other questions let me know (as a suffering AQA Sociology student, I'd be happy to help! xD)
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soysox
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by LenniesRabbit)
Hi, don't worry we were told the same thing. It's true but not in the way that your teachers explain it. xD
What you need is to be able to give an up-to-date argument. So obviously you will consider the views of past feminist sociologists e.g. Ansley (1972) who just believe women soak up mens anger and frustration and therefore women's position in society is not improving, but then you should be able to say that Liberal feminists do see women's position as changing e.g. through 2017 Women's Protests. Sex Discrimination Act changes and recent investigations into unequal pay between men and women.

Overall though, modern day examples should be used as examples to back up your point. Using recent Conservative party policies or feminist protests/ media investigations / educational changes or for demography use up-to-date statistics from like... last month. Thats basically what they mean But overall don't put too much emphasis on researching for it. These should just be things you've heard in the news or something that you've overheard people talking about in public!

Any other questions let me know (as a suffering AQA Sociology student, I'd be happy to help! xD)
Thank you so much! That's a great comfort to hear and very well explained, I much appreciate it.
Just as a wonder, does your teacher use the phrase 'chain of reasoning' and how do they explain it? I know that's a bit of a hefty question, so it's alright not to answer! It's just a worry of mine since different teachers (and the book!) explain it differently.
Thank you
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LenniesRabbit
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#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by soysox)
Thank you so much! That's a great comfort to hear and very well explained, I much appreciate it.
Just as a wonder, does your teacher use the phrase 'chain of reasoning' and how do they explain it? I know that's a bit of a hefty question, so it's alright not to answer! It's just a worry of mine since different teachers (and the book!) explain it differently.
Thank you
Oh no that's fine. So a chain of reasoning is basically another way of saying elaborating until you can't elaborate anymore.
So, your initial point for a question asking to evaluate perspectives on the role and function of the family would be that:
1. The role of the family, for Marxists, is to help capitalism to thrive.
2. This is because of the functions the nuclear family provides e.g. ideological/women being child-bearers to secure private property (explain what these are)
3. These functions make sure that capitalism is upheld and continues to thrive.
4. This means that as long as the nuclear family exists and performs these functions, capitalism will live on.
5. Therefore for Marxists the family only works to help the capitalist bourgeoisie (linking back to question)

This chain of reasoning just helps to make sure that you don't just state a point and not fully 100% apply it to the question. It forces you to develop and develop so that examiners know that you are deeply analysing your point. I kept using the words 'This is' up there to show how it's basically just elaborating a LOT, but obviously there are more sophisticated ways to do it! xD

Hope this makes sense. If not or there is anything else let me know!
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