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I want to go away on holidays but don't like the thought of going on planes. Help Watch

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    I've always been wary of flying. I've been on a plane before but I always avoid going on holidays etc as I think I'd rather live life in the uk than risk dying on a plane. Its illogical maybe but my brain doesn't think so. Even if I went on a plane I would worry the whole holiday about comming back again. The problem is it's more my thought process than an actual fear I think because when I was on a plane I wasn't panicking or anything. How can I get over this, I want to be like everyone else, peaceful in my mind and assured that nothing bad will happen if I get on a plane. What is the thought process of most people who get on a plane? I've looked up the statistics of anything bad happening on a plane but this doesn't help, my brain just sees it as a big risk even though I understand the irrationality. I don't want to waste my life in the UK (although it's not a bad country) I just want to go on holidays abroad like most people. Although part of me doesn't because of the plane flight.
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    I know it's definitely scary, the idea of placing yourself in such a large contraption which being so complicated, could potentially have many things go wrong. But remember, the risks are minimised as much as possible, there's always a plan for emergencies, all the crew are expertly trained for any situation and the holiday itself is well worth the small anxious feeling of flight.
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    I've been on probably around 100 flights in my life and, ngl, I still worry a bit. I agree with you though, it's totally irrational - you're more likely to get killed in a car accident on the way to the airport than a plane crash. Maybe go ask your doc for some diazepam. I used to get very scared beforehand but taking diazepam has almost totally removed my fear. I took it on several flights, then put it in my pocket so it'd be there if I needed it, but after a few flights being so calm most of my fear just disappeared.
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    https://fearlessflyer.easyjet.com/faqs.php

    Go on a fear of flying course. This one is £189. Other airlines do them as well
    Not that expensive if it lasts a lifetime
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    It can be treated. Drugs can help to an extent. A better solution may be therapy which can try to reprogram the thought processes so you can deal with those thoughts when they come.

    Most of the time I fly, I don't even think about it going wrong. When I do, I just remind myself of the statistics. If there is turbulence or something doesn't feel right, I watch the air-hostesses. They do it everyday so know whats normal. If they look calm, I'm happy. If they started to panic, I would to but that hasn't happened to me.

    Otherwise, France is beautiful and you don't need a plane. There are quite a few countries in Europe that you could reach for a holiday without flying.
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    I m terrified of planes, I ve gotten 6 flights by listening to music until security then by focusing on breathing mostly. I try to be tired before flights if I can
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    (Original post by indigofox)
    I've always been wary of flying. I've been on a plane before but I always avoid going on holidays etc as I think I'd rather live life in the uk than risk dying on a plane. Its illogical maybe but my brain doesn't think so. Even if I went on a plane I would worry the whole holiday about comming back again. The problem is it's more my thought process than an actual fear I think because when I was on a plane I wasn't panicking or anything. How can I get over this, I want to be like everyone else, peaceful in my mind and assured that nothing bad will happen if I get on a plane. What is the thought process of most people who get on a plane? I've looked up the statistics of anything bad happening on a plane but this doesn't help, my brain just sees it as a big risk even though I understand the irrationality. I don't want to waste my life in the UK (although it's not a bad country) I just want to go on holidays abroad like most people. Although part of me doesn't because of the plane flight.
    Statistically flying is the safest form of travel - not that that helps you much.

    You have two choices really

    1. Get over it by getting blisteringly drunk beforehand like I do

    2. Take the train - Europe has a huge network which is fantastic - I have done inter railing a couple of times - nothing like taking a train which lands you right in the middle of the destination city.
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    You are more likely to die every time you get in a car than in a plane. Or is that just going to make you afraid to drive places too...?

    But seriously like others say you can get nearly anywhere in Europe by train or you can get the ferry and it's especially fast to get to France or Belgium. When I go to the continent I rarely get the plane, I usually drive to Dover and get a ferry then just drive to the different countries in Europe, or get the Eurostar. It's pretty easy for me as I live in Kent (so near the coast) but it may not be so easy if you live far from London or the coastline.
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    Risk is the product of how bad something going wrong would be, and how likely that something is to happen. A large asteroid impact would be a cataclysmic event, but this is offset by how unlikely it is to happen (although that hasn't stopped organisations such as NASA formulating a redirect plan - just in case), so it is relatively low-risk. Conversely, someone walking into you on the street isn't a hugely disastrous event, but it quite likely to happen, so its risk is increased.

    Risk management aims to lower risks by lowering one of these factors (usually the likelihood of the bad thing happening), and it forms the basis of Health and Safety arrangements.

    In the context of aviation, risk is surprisingly low, as the safety culture in the industry ensures that the number one buzzword is 'safety'. Every accident is investigated by a government body, and recommendations are made to reduce the chances of something similar happening. Mid-air collision? Most aircraft now are fitted with a TCAS (Traffic Collision and Avoidance System), which alerts pilots if they become too close, and provides immediate instructions on how to avoid the collision. Engine cuts-out over the Atlantic? Commercial twin jets are designed to operate on a single engine - a system known as ETOPS (Extended Twin OPerationS) ensures that they are always within range of a suitable diversion airfield. There are literally millions of safety systems in the aviation world designed specifically to ensure that aviation is the safest form of transport, as has been said above.

    Many people have fears such as these because they feel out of control. Learn about aviation, and about every little system it has. Take a flying lesson if you have to! Try getting on a flight - just a short one, say Manchester to London - and see how you feel. Enjoy the view! If you still don't manage it, there's no shame there; only you can decide how many times you want to try it!

    Best of Luck!
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    Embrace the fear!

    Like a roller coaster or driving too fast.

    Be like "WHOA!!" :nutcase:

    I actually wish I was scared of flying too.
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    (Original post by Akuma)
    Embrace the fear!

    Like a roller coaster or driving too fast.

    Be like "WHOA!!" :nutcase:

    I actually wish I was scared of flying too.
    I've never done either, both out of fear :P

    But hey, this sounds fun, I'll give it a go!
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    (Original post by TimGB)
    I've never done either, both out of fear :P

    But hey, this sounds fun, I'll give it a go!
    Roller coasters would probably do you good.

    Or this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_(ride)

    It totally abolished the fear I had of rides that went upside down. Very smooth ride.
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    I completely get where you're coming from. I used to be exactly like that, and sometimes still am.

    One thing that helps me is looking at air traffic - ( https://www.flightradar24.com is one example) I think when you see how many planes are up there at any one time, and think about how rare plane crashes are - it feels more safe. Statistically you're more likely to have a car crash on the way to the airport, then actually crash on a plane. Oh, and I remember hearing (look it up because I'm not sure if it's true) that more people survive plane crashes than die in one. So... it's pretty safe.
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    (Original post by Akuma)
    Roller coasters would probably do you good.

    Or this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_(ride)

    It totally abolished the fear I had of rides that went upside down. Very smooth ride.
    That sounds fun. I have to admit my biggest fear of rollercoasters was going upside down (I've been on coasters without this), so your answer is particularly relevant.
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    I guess the problem here is not actually getting yourself on the plane but more the fact you don't want to spend hundred of £ on a holiday to spend the whole thing worrying about flying home. In which case I think the best thing to do is practice how to block out intrusive thoughts - if there are any other worries or fears you have you can practice on those. Some methods could be keeping busy, writing them down, challenging them and mindfulness.
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    (Original post by indigofox)
    I've always been wary of flying. I've been on a plane before but I always avoid going on holidays etc as I think I'd rather live life in the uk than risk dying on a plane. Its illogical maybe but my brain doesn't think so. Even if I went on a plane I would worry the whole holiday about comming back again. The problem is it's more my thought process than an actual fear I think because when I was on a plane I wasn't panicking or anything. How can I get over this, I want to be like everyone else, peaceful in my mind and assured that nothing bad will happen if I get on a plane. What is the thought process of most people who get on a plane? I've looked up the statistics of anything bad happening on a plane but this doesn't help, my brain just sees it as a big risk even though I understand the irrationality. I don't want to waste my life in the UK (although it's not a bad country) I just want to go on holidays abroad like most people. Although part of me doesn't because of the plane flight.
    On my most recent plane journey last year I panicked about missing the flight but didn't give a thought to the plane journey itself.
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    Use the Eurostar and connecting trains and there are plenty of places you can get to within a day's travel.
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    Have you considered transportation by sea or train? Get a boat to one location, the train to another, and so forth. Long distances this might be a bit time consuming, but over continents with great rail infrastructure it'll be much easier.
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    tbh I'm not afraid of planes but when it goes up , my ears starts to land my ears start to hurt soooo much lol
 
 
 
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