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What is a decent salary? watch

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    I'm looking for £60k+ eventualy (average for a graduate of computer science is £55k and starts at £25k - yes I'm doing computer science :rolleyes: ) however money isn't as important as people think; Money is a way to get happiness but a very inefficent way. Therefore as long as you like your job and can live comfortably you have all the money you need.

    Not sure how many of you have heard of EMA (Educational Maintanance Allowance) but your parents have to earn <£20,000 to get it and I know of loads of people on it (it was tried here before going nation wide this year) and they live good lives (however this is a low income area).
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    Well, my graduates salary should be at least 21k (hopefully, and this is when i'm 21 years of age) then afterwards I should work my way up to about over 50k when i'm just reaching 30 years of age..... That's if a bit of luck is on my side, meeting the right peole could send you fly sky high, but at the end of the day it's always down to hard work...
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    s43 seemed to think he can be into 6-figures in 5 years if I remember correctly.
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    (Original post by MRLX69)
    Well, my graduates salary should be at least 21k (hopefully, and this is when i'm 21 years of age) then afterwards I should work my way up to about over 50k when i'm just reaching 30 years of age..... That's if a bit of luck is on my side, meeting the right peole could send you fly sky high, but at the end of the day it's always down to hard work...
    thankgod someone who doesn't want 50k when they graduate
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    [QUOTE=steerpike1985]If you're a graduate about £20k would be a good starting salary - within 5-10 years from this you would be expecting to be on about 30k +. In terms of moving out, getting your own 1-bedroom house and a mortage, with 30k you'd be able to do it comfortably.[/QUOTE

    Imagine that! Roughly ten years after you graduate you'll be able to afford your very own one bedroom rabbit hutch! Brilliant!
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    [QUOTE=Howard]
    (Original post by steerpike1985)
    If you're a graduate about £20k would be a good starting salary - within 5-10 years from this you would be expecting to be on about 30k +. In terms of moving out, getting your own 1-bedroom house and a mortage, with 30k you'd be able to do it comfortably.[/QUOTE

    Imagine that! Roughly ten years after you graduate you'll be able to afford your very own one bedroom rabbit hutch! Brilliant!
    30k a year will get you a nice 3 bedroom house up north, quit it with your southern misconceptions
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    (Original post by Vladek)
    30k a year will get you a nice 3 bedroom house up north, quit it with your southern misconceptions
    Only if you take on a huge loan (like 5 times your gross salary)

    what will 90k a year get you? and say my partner is on...... 40 k...
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    (Original post by DazYa777)
    what will 90k a year get you? and say my partner is on...... 40 k...
    Well, traditionally lenders will stretch to 3.5 times gross salary so assuming you put zero down that would get you a 455k home; possibly more, depending on finding a flexible lender.
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    (Original post by DazYa777)
    what will 90k a year get you? and say my partner is on...... 40 k...
    I think you can get about 3 times your wage + 2 and half times your partners wage or something. so say you're both on 30k thats what 165k, i think you can get a 3 bed no problem
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    (Original post by DazYa777)
    what will 90k a year get you? and say my partner is on...... 40 k...
    As a generalisation, you can get roughly 3 1/2 times your salary in mortgage. Don't forget the 5% deposit. So roughly a £455,000 mortgage, along with a £22,750 deposit would mean you could get a £477,750 property. But that's only a generalisation. I hear you can lend more on your mortgage in London.

    I notice all you guys are after computery jobs or medical jobs or sciencey jobs.... well, in that case, i'm screwed then(!) lol
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    (Original post by ~Skye~)
    I notice all you guys are after computery jobs or medical jobs or sciencey jobs.... well, in that case, i'm screwed then(!) lol
    you can get a decent salary with out a technical degree
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    :eek: It must be cheap where I live, if you need £40k to survive comfortably! We manage it on just under £15k! But then my dad has a, erm, crap job. And my mum's a secretary. Not bad for a family that used to get closer to £50k a year when my dad worked for E.D.S, and has nothing left to show for it...
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    (Original post by Fleff)
    :eek: It must be cheap where I live, if you need £40k to survive comfortably! We manage it on just under £15k! But then my dad has a, erm, crap job. And my mum's a secretary. Not bad for a family that used to get closer to £50k a year when my dad worked for E.D.S, and has nothing left to show for it...
    Outside London I'd say an individual could easily live on £10-15k, if they don't waste too much money on booze etc.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Outside London I'd say an individual could easily live on £10-15k, if they don't waste too much money on booze etc.
    An individual or a family of 4?
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    (Original post by Fleff)
    An individual or a family of 4?
    An individual. In fact £7-8k's enough if you consider that students survive on ~£5k/year.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    An individual. In fact £7-8k's enough if you consider that students survive on ~£5k/year.
    Right... My family (of 4; me, sister, mum, dad) survive on £14,000 a year. And that's with 2 students... Oh, and a dog, which needs feeding, vets bills, etc...
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    (Original post by Fleff)
    Right... My family (of 4; me, sister, mum, dad) survive on £14,000 a year. And that's with 2 students... Oh, and a dog, which needs feeding, vets bills, etc...
    If you're living comfortably then that wipes out the idea from this thread that you need at least 30k to survive.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    If you're living comfortably then that wipes out the idea from this thread that you need at least 30k to survive.
    I believe it does then...
 
 
 
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