Macbeth Quotes Watch

audrey8486
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I need help finding a 20 line quotes from Macbeth and to explain: what does the quote mean, at what point in the play does this takes place, and what is the significance of this quote (how does it further develop the play)
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khahg
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Hope this helps, not everything has explanation or analysis, which I will leave to someone better at English than me.



“When shall we three meet again

In thunder, lightning, or in rain?”

Act 1 scene 1



“Thunder. Enter First Apparition, an armed Head.” Act 4 scene 1



“Thunder. Enter Second Apparition, A bloody Child” Act 4 scene 1



“Thunder. Third Apparition, a Child crowned with a tree in his hand” Act 4 scene 1



“I’ll give thee a wind.” Act 1 scene 3 line 11

The second witch is giving the first a wind to sail her sieve on







Fate vs. Free Will:is Macbeth’s tragic end predestined or does he create it through unwise and amoral choices (does he have to kill Duncan to become King or will it happen anyway?) Fate: Macbeth was fated to kill Duncan regardless of what the witches said. It was all part of the plan/predestination. Free Will: Macbeth made the decision to kill Duncan and take things into his own hands. He would have gotten the throne sometime anyway.



KEY QUOTATIONS:







FIRST WITCH
All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis!

SECOND WITCH
All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!

THIRD WITCH
All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter! (1.3.51-53)



CAPTAIN

And Fortune, on his damnèd quarrel smiling,

Show'd like a rebel's whore. But all's too weak;

For brave Macbeth (well he deserves that name)

Disdaining Fortune, with his brandished steel,

Which smoked with bloody execution, (1.2.16-20)





New honors come upon him,

Like ouir strange garments, cleave not to their mold

But with the aid of use. (1.3.158-160)



If chance will have me King, why, chance may crown me,

Without my stir. (1.3.154-155)



Appearance vs. Reality: people look and pretend to be different than their inner emotions/motives



KEY QUOTATIONS: “no art to find the mind’s construction in the face,”



"Hangs loose about him, like a giant's robe upon a dwarfish thief."



Fair is foul, and foul is fair;

Hover through the fog and filthy air. Act 1 scene 1



So foul and fair a day I have not seen. Act 1 scene 3



“ Nothing is but what it is not” Macbeth act 1 scene 3





Revenge vs Justice:





KEY QUOTATIONS:



Blood will have blood Act 3 scene 4



O, treachery!

Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly!

Thou mayst revenge-O slave!

Dies. Fleance escapes

Act 3 scene 3



Macbeth

It is concluded. Banquo, thy soul’s flight

If it find heaven, must find it out tonight

Act 3 scene 1







The Unnatural:



KEY QUOTATIONS:

That look not like th' inhabitants o' th' Earth,

And yet are on ’t? act 1 scene 3



You should be women,

And yet your beards forbid me to interpret

That you are so. Act 1 scene 3



why do I yield to that suggestion

Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair

And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,

Against the use of nature? Act 1 scene 3



Ambition/Power:

KEY QUOTATIONS:

thou wouldst be great,

Art not without ambition, but without

The illness should attend it. Act 1 scene 5 Lady Macbeth



Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up

Thine own life's means! Act 2 scene 4



“My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical shakes

so my single state of man.” Act 1 scene 3



Disease and Sickness:

KEY QUOTATIONS:

Duncan is in his grave;

After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; (III.ii)



Infirm of purpose!

Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead

Are but as pictures: (II.ii)



Cure her of that. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased/ Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff/ Which weighs upon the hear Act 5 scene 3

Manhood/Masculinity:

KEY QUOTATIONS:

Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be

What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature;

It is too full o’ the milk of human kindness(15)

To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great;"





Come, you spirits

That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,

And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full

Of direst cruelty



When you durst do it, then you were a man;

And, to be more than what you were, you would

Be so much more the man.



Blood: This connotes death, violence and comes to symbolise Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s guilt

KEY QUOTATIONS:

'Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand?'.



My hands are of your colour, but I shame to wear a heart so white.



And with thy bloody and invisible hand

Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond

Which keeps me pale! Act 3 scene 2







Sleep:

KEY QUOTATIONS:

“I have seen her /rise from her bed, throw her nightgown upon her ,/ unlock her closet, take forth paper, fold it, write upon/ ‘t, read it, afterwards seal ot, and again return to bed;/ yet all this while in a most fast sleep.”

“Why, it stood by her, She has light by her continually. ‘Tis her command”5.1



Darkness:

KEY QUOTATIONS:

“Come, thick night,/ And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,/ That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,/ Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark ”

“Let not light see my dark and deep desires”

“out, out brief candle" Act 5.5



Animal Imagery: Scorpions represent evil. When a scorpion stings you, it puts poison in your body. This is similar to when the witches tell Macbeth that he will be a king and when they say that only a man not born of a woman will kill him. Readers understand the play better and animals give something to relate to. Makes the play more interesting. They are used to foreshadow events and to describe Macbeth. They are also easy to compare things to.

KEY QUOTATIONS:

“Oh, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!”

“A falcon, tow'ring in her pride of place,/ Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.”

“And Duncan’s horses—a thing most strange and certain—/ Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,/ Turned wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out,/ Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would /Make war with mankind.”

These two quotes fore shadow the downfall of Macbeth and make the unnatural death of Duncan obvious.
A �.R��A
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