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    Hmm, How difficult can they get. Can anyone give me a brief comparison between them?
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    (Original post by Godsize)
    Hmm, How difficult can they get. Can anyone give me a brief comparison between them?
    Well I haven't done it for AS or A-level, but I considered it and apparently it gets a lot harder, and I ended up deciding to do physics. Only do chemistry if you like it and are good at it, it's not a subject you can ease through by cramming in some revision before exams.
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    Its quite a bit harder. My teacher made us believe GCSE chem was really hard though. We have a lot of work to do compared to GCSEs. Its only really reccomended if you enjoy it, as otherwise it'll be really dull and difficult.
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    About as much fun you can have without crying :rolleyes:

    It's more about what forms a compound, and how it's properties are related to it's structure (and the reaction conditions) ect. Hell of a lot more detail.

    Plus, many, many more praticals.
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    Well they actually start teaching you some chemistry at A-Level rather than the rubbish they fill your head with at GCSE
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    It really does step up from GCSE Chemistry, you begin to learn the real facts more and there's a lot of it! I did AS Chem but after I started doing A2 Chem (for over half a year) I decided to drop it since I figured I couldn't cope after my Jan results. If you're looking to learn proper chemistry thenit's a darn sight better than anything at GCSE
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    (Original post by LifeWired)
    It really does step up from GCSE Chemistry, you begin to learn the real facts more and there's a lot of it! I did AS Chem but after I started doing A2 Chem (for over half a year) I decided to drop it since I figured I couldn't cope after my Jan results. If you're looking to learn proper chemistry thenit's a darn sight better than anything at GCSE
    what did you get for you AS chemistry grade?
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    Ah, well first you learn that the majority of stuff they taught you at GCSE is LIES, LIES I TELL YOU () - and then you learn how it's properly done. I think I would have enjoyed my Chemistry A-Level if one of my teachers hadn't been so crap. The thing is that there's a lot of little stupid things that you need to know in the exam that aren't necessarily in the textbook, but if you don't know them because your teacher is too crap to tell you what they are, you're gonna lose marks, and the grade boundaries in some papers are so tight that those marks seriously make all the difference. Fortunately I was saved by the good Chemistry teacher who taught me all those little things like how to draw the curly arrows in reaction mechanisms "just so" in order to get those marks.

    The practicals are reasonably easy, depending on what syllabus you're doing and if you're the sort of person who likes practicals and doesn't chuck away the standard solution instead of the used titration mixture (d'oh). Personally I'd recommend going for a practical exam rather than coursework assessment as it will save you a lot of extra homework and stress.

    The main difference is the depth of knowledge basically - the big joy of Chemistry (not ) is going over all the stuff you did at AS level (in my case Organic Chem, Stoichiometry (counting atoms), and Enthalpy cycles) in even more detail at A-Level! It's good if you enjoy the topics - organic chemistry IMO is the most interesting because there's lots of reactions and it's intriguing how the different functional groups interact with each other. However, if you get mind-boggled by trying to explain how you can get one compound from another using three or four different reactions then it might not be for you. The main skills you need for A-Level Chemistry are maths, a good ability in understanding how networks of reactions interact and an eye for those stupid little details in exam questions that turn out to be the pivotal factor in your answer. Of course, maths and eye for stupid little details you needed at GCSE, too, but the main step up from GCSE is learning to see the role of your knowledge in the bigger picture, which is the key to every A-Level science

    I know I haven't presented Chemistry in the most favourable light in this account - it was mainly due to the fact that I had to spend too much time at home teaching myself out of the book and I ceased to enjoy the subject - but the material itself is fascinating and I did enjoy learning about it all. If you think you would enjoy learning how all the little atoms in the world react together to make the big things around us, go for it!
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    I really didnt enjoy GCSE Chemistry and found it to be a really dull subject, always doing boring experiments and stuff but I decided to do chemistry AS in the end because you need it for medicine.
    I just got my AS results and ended up with a grade B. Im really pleased with my grade as during the course I found the majority of it to be boring and a lot of times didnt do well in my homeworks.
    Its a lot harder to understand than GCSE chemistry, there is a lot more to remember but it was alright because my teacher kept setting us tests throughout the year so when it came to revising at the end it wasnt too bad although I did walk into the exam thinking I would do badly because there was still quite a bit that I hadnt remembered properly from my revision.
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    I think that Chemistry at GCSE (especially if you do an integrated course, and even more so if you do a modularised integrated course) is very different to Chemistry at AS-Level. I just got my results, and fortunately got an A. The course is very stimulating, but it requires the precision you'd normally associate with modern languages or the operation of a nuclear sub.

    I would advise most people to consider their reasons for choosing chemistry
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    Well for a brief comparison...i got A in gcse chemistry, and got an E in AS chemistry. It was very hard at the time, however i then did some retakes and the second time round it seemed a lot easier. I think it just requires a lot of sitting down and reading til you understand it...and that may take a long time!
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    chemistry requires logical thinking , if maths is your weak point then you might as well forget it as most of the mechanisms in the first year DO require maths

    chemistry isnt really a subject where you learn from cover to cover, you have to KNOW your stuff and be able to apply it in different situations
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    Depends on the exam board. Edexcel Nuffield has hardly any mechanisms and the ones they do have are quite easy.
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    Chemistry at Advanced Level is hardcore.
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    (Original post by Godsize)
    Hmm, How difficult can they get. Can anyone give me a brief comparison between them?
    when i went to my 1st a-level lecture my teacher said
    'forget everything we taught you at gcse. We lied.'

    I promptly peed myself....
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    (Original post by frost105)
    when i went to my 1st a-level lecture my teacher said
    'forget everything we taught you at gcse. We lied.'

    I promptly peed myself....
    That reminds me of my first Physics lesson when my teacher said, 'As you all know, GCSE Physics is a load of b******t.'
 
 
 
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