chocochip_
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I'm currently in my AS year and I take Psychology, Biology and Chemistry. Out of all three of my subjects I know for certain that I'm the most interested in Psychology and that I want to do it in the future but my worry is, is that that's all I know.
I don't know what kind of Psychology degrees there are, I don't understand what a doctorate or a bachelors is, I don't know the different areas of psychology I can study at university, I dont know what different courses entail and most importantly, apart from the obvious jobs such as clinical psychologist etc. I don't know what career options are available for me if I choose Psychology either! Can someone please give me a hand, maybe link a few website where I can start my research because I have no clue where to start.
Thank you!!
0
reply
chocochip_
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#2
Anyone there?
0
reply
Michiyo
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
A Bachelor's degree is just a normal university degree that you take after you finish your A-levels. Sciences like maths and physics are BSc (Bachelor of Science) degrees. Some engineering courses are BEng (Bachelor of Engineering) degrees and some are BSc degrees. Any non-science is a BA (Bachelor of Arts) degree. Some courses, like politics and sociology, are offered in both BSc and BA form. Psychology is one of these courses. Judging by your subjects, I suspect you would be more interested in a BSc Psychology.

A Bachelor's degree takes three years, as you may already know, but it takes four years for Modern Languages or with study abroad/work experience students. The reason why it takes four years for Modern Languages students is that they have an integrated year of study abroad.

After a Bachelor's degree, you can do a Master's. It can be an MA, MSc, MEng or even MPol (Master of Politics). This usually takes a single year and is used as a stepping stone towards your doctorate. It can take two years, though.

Some undergraduate courses have the option of taking both a Bachelor's and a Master's degree at the same time (integrated Master's). This usually takes four years or five if you do study abroad/work experience or are a Modern Languages student.

The doctorate, known as PhD (Doctor of Philosopy), takes three years normally, but there are a few special cases in which it takes four years.

Cambridge calls Master's degrees and doctorates MPhil (Master of Philosophy) and DPhil (Doctor of Philosophy), so if you encounter these names, do not get confused.

What areas of psychology you study depends on the university, so you will have to look into universities and check their course structure. For example, a first year Psychology student at Exeter studies biological, clinical, and social psychology, but a first year Psychology student at Leeds studies biological, social, cognitive, and developmental psychology.

Here are a few sites where you can find information about psychology jobs:

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/psychology
http://www.bps.org.uk/careers-portal
https://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/psychol.htm
1
reply
marple
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by noor.m)
I'm currently in my AS year and I take Psychology, Biology and Chemistry. Out of all three of my subjects I know for certain that I'm the most interested in Psychology and that I want to do it in the future but my worry is, is that that's all I know.
I don't know what kind of Psychology degrees there are, I don't understand what a doctorate or a bachelors is, I don't know the different areas of psychology I can study at university, I dont know what different courses entail and most importantly, apart from the obvious jobs such as clinical psychologist etc. I don't know what career options are available for me if I choose Psychology either! Can someone please give me a hand, maybe link a few website where I can start my research because I have no clue where to start.
Thank you!!
Hi

After A levels the normal route is to study for a BSc (3 years). You can then study for a Masters (1 year). Some universities (eg Leeds) now offer combined masters where you study for 4 years to complete the BSc and Masters without having to secure extra funding for the Masters. A doctorate (PhD) is the most advanced level of qualification and can be done after a BSc / Masters.

Most students graduating with a BSc in psychology don't actually become psychologists, they use their degree as a general degree and work in a whole range of sectors. Some go on the work as psychologists, with the main areas being Clinical (typically hospitals/mental health), Educational (working with pupils/young people) and Forensic (prisons/offenders).

This site gives useful information about psychology in the UK

http://beta.bps.org.uk/

and it is worth looking at some university websites to get an idea of the what you would study. Most (but not all) UK degrees are accredited by the BPS and if you want to work in psychology in the future this is important.

The BPS hold annual conferences for 6th form/undergraduate students with a series of talks/lectures on a range of topics and these are very interesting if you go to one

All the best
1
reply
chocochip_
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by marple)
Hi

After A levels the normal route is to study for a BSc (3 years). You can then study for a Masters (1 year). Some universities (eg Leeds) now offer combined masters where you study for 4 years to complete the BSc and Masters without having to secure extra funding for the Masters. A doctorate (PhD) is the most advanced level of qualification and can be done after a BSc / Masters.

Most students graduating with a BSc in psychology don't actually become psychologists, they use their degree as a general degree and work in a whole range of sectors. Some go on the work as psychologists, with the main areas being Clinical (typically hospitals/mental health), Educational (working with pupils/young people) and Forensic (prisons/offenders).

This site gives useful information about psychology in the UK

http://beta.bps.org.uk/

and it is worth looking at some university websites to get an idea of the what you would study. Most (but not all) UK degrees are accredited by the BPS and if you want to work in psychology in the future this is important.

The BPS hold annual conferences for 6th form/undergraduate students with a series of talks/lectures on a range of topics and these are very interesting if you go to one

All the best
Thank you!
0
reply
chocochip_
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by Michiyo)
A Bachelor's degree is just a normal university degree that you take after you finish your A-levels. Sciences like maths and physics are BSc (Bachelor of Science) degrees. Some engineering courses are BEng (Bachelor of Engineering) degrees and some are BSc degrees. Any non-science is a BA (Bachelor of Arts) degree. Some courses, like politics and sociology, are offered in both BSc and BA form. Psychology is one of these courses. Judging by your subjects, I suspect you would be more interested in a BSc Psychology.

A Bachelor's degree takes three years, as you may already know, but it takes four years for Modern Languages or with study abroad/work experience students. The reason why it takes four years for Modern Languages students is that they have an integrated year of study abroad.

After a Bachelor's degree, you can do a Master's. It can be an MA, MSc, MEng or even MPol (Master of Politics). This usually takes a single year and is used as a stepping stone towards your doctorate. It can take two years, though.

Some undergraduate courses have the option of taking both a Bachelor's and a Master's degree at the same time (integrated Master's). This usually takes four years or five if you do study abroad/work experience or are a Modern Languages student.

The doctorate, known as PhD (Doctor of Philosopy), takes three years normally, but there are a few special cases in which it takes four years.

Cambridge calls Master's degrees and doctorates MPhil (Master of Philosophy) and DPhil (Doctor of Philosophy), so if you encounter these names, do not get confused.

What areas of psychology you study depends on the university, so you will have to look into universities and check their course structure. For example, a first year Psychology student at Exeter studies biological, clinical, and social psychology, but a first year Psychology student at Leeds studies biological, social, cognitive, and developmental psychology.

Here are a few sites where you can find information about psychology jobs:

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/psychology
http://www.bps.org.uk/careers-portal
https://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/psychol.htm
Thank you so much!
0
reply
iammichealjackson
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by noor.m)
I'm currently in my AS year and I take Psychology, Biology and Chemistry. Out of all three of my subjects I know for certain that I'm the most interested in Psychology and that I want to do it in the future but my worry is, is that that's all I know.
I don't know what kind of Psychology degrees there are, I don't understand what a doctorate or a bachelors is, I don't know the different areas of psychology I can study at university, I dont know what different courses entail and most importantly, apart from the obvious jobs such as clinical psychologist etc. I don't know what career options are available for me if I choose Psychology either! Can someone please give me a hand, maybe link a few website where I can start my research because I have no clue where to start.
Thank you!!
Have a look at some of the resources linked below for a guide to what psychology is more about. I'd have a flick through a general undergrad/a level textbook to get some idea of the different parts of psychology.

This isn't something you have to worry about now though, i would simply apply for a basic "psychology" degree, rather than the specialised ones (e.g. developmental psychology, clinical psychology, applied psychology). These specialised courses tend to have similar 1st and 2nd year content anyway... but they mostly differ in the third year of study (where you have more choices over what you can study at a more advanced level).

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2739866
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (706)
33.93%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (889)
42.72%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (393)
18.89%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (93)
4.47%

Watched Threads

View All