#HangAyazNizami Trends on Twitter - Pakistani Secular Blogger

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username2950448
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#1
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A Pakistani secular blogger, Ayaz Nizami (a pseudonym), was recently charged with blasphemy and faces the death penalty.

In response to this ruling, the #HangAyazNizami hashtag was started by Pakistanis that seek the hanging of Ayaz, and the hashtag has been trending on Twitter.

Some of the Tweets include:

#HangAyazNizami and Rana Nauman too ...who is equally involved in this crime
Strong proofs are available against Ayaz Nizami. Come on Govt now #HangAyazNizami without any if n but. Our Country our Law, Our Punishment
Blasphemey is not freedom of speech.
#HangAyazNizami
The fact that such a large proportion of Pakistani society support the death penalty against an atheist blogger, for the "crime" of blasphemy is one thing. The fact that so many of them feel so strongly, yet so nonchalant, about it that they openly call for his hanging on the internet with no shame, is even more shocking.

This is no fringe minority. This is a very large section of the Muslim Pakistani population lusting for the killing of an atheist blogger.

We have seen the outrage over Milo Yiannopoulos, and his subsequent Twitter ban (I don't imagine the Pakistanis tweeting this hashtag will suffer the same fate). We have seen just a few days ago the Canadian Parliament passing Motion 103, condemning "Islamophobia". Where is the outrage over this? Are we to ignore this large section of violent and barbaric-belief holding individuals in Pakistan, perhaps pretending they are not 'real Muslims'?

Either way, this story is very sad and each Tweet sent using that hashtag is a damning indictment of the sorry state of Pakistani society.

https://heatst.com/world/hangayazniz...for-blasphemy/
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username2950448
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
I feel that the fact that a secular blogger has survived this long in Pakistan is the news here.

Anyway, we still have blasphemy laws in much of Europe. People now even get killed over offending a religion.

We're also in a sorry state.
Very few countries in Europe have blasphemy laws, and a major difference is that no country in Europe has the death penalty for blasphemy-offences (or, indeed, for any offence).

But the biggest distinction, to my mind, is societal views. Sure, Denmark may have blasphemy laws (very rarely enforced), but you wouldn't see #HangDanishBlasphemer trending on Dutch Twitter now, would you?
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Slipandsquirm
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
I feel that the fact that a secular blogger has survived this long in Pakistan is the news here.

Anyway, we still have blasphemy laws in much of Europe. People now even get killed over offending a religion.

We're also in a sorry state.
You are really struggling to be controversial here :mmm:

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username521617
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Hmm, I'm trying to remember the last time we hanged a heretic. I think it was some time in the 1600s.

These people have nukes. Let that sink in for a moment.
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Plantagenet Crown
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Absolutely disgusting and sickening.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
Hmm, I'm trying to remember the last time we hanged a heretic. I think it was some time in the 1600s.

These people have nukes. Let that sink in for a moment.
Yeah and America is the only country to have used an atomic bomb on another country.
Let that sink in.
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username2950448
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(Original post by Meri Awaaz Suno)
Yeah and America is the only country to have used an atomic bomb on another country.
Let that sink in.
As a Pakistani, do you have anything to say about this thread?

I figure you would be in a better position to contribute than the average TSR user, after all.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by Palmyra)
As a Pakistani, do you have anything to say about this thread?

I figure you would be in a better position to contribute than the average TSR user, after all.
I disagree with this man being given the death penalty but to be honest he is kind of stupid if he says stuff like that in Pakistan which is a Muslim majority country.

I beleave that the death penalty should exist in Pakistan for the following reason.
Over the last 2-3 years Pakistan Army has been involved in hard-core anti-terrorism operations on the Western frountier (FATA); Operation Zarb-e-Azab, Ghazi, Raad-ul-Fazzad, etc. These operations came after the deadly attack on Army Public School which killed over 100 children and teachers.
I'm glad to say that Pakistan's small province (FATA) where this problem came from is now under the civil government and army control and terrorism has decreased alot!
I beleave it should exist to get rid of rascals that kill innocent men, women and children.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by JohnGreek)
Are conservative Muslims capable of using anything other than blatant (and somewhat irrelevant to the topic) whataboutery to substantiate their arguments?

Would you mind explaining why should someone be put to death by the State for blasphemy?
Did I say he should be put to death? No, I didn't.
Don't judge 1.6 Billion people by 1 person. I can say the same thing about you and say that you probably support EDL or some thing along the lines of that.
Go learn about Pakistan before you comment.
The man talked about Pakistan and it's nukes. Do you know we have one of the safest nuclear controls in the world?
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username2950448
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(Original post by Meri Awaaz Suno)
I disagree with this man being given the death penalty but to be honest he is kind of stupid if he says stuff like that in Pakistan which is a Muslim majority country.
Thank you for your input.

I am glad you personally disagree with this. I see where you are coming from, but don't you think your attitude treats Pakistan as though it is a country incapable of having a plurality of opinions expressed freely without the need for people to recourse to violence?

I beleave that the death penalty should exist in Pakistan for the following reason.
...
I beleave it should exist to get rid of rascals that kill innocent men, women and children.
I see, so only for terrorists, essentially? Not for blasphemy etc?
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by Palmyra)
Thank you for your input.

I am glad you personally disagree with this. I see where you are coming from, but don't think you think your attitude treats Pakistan as though it is a country incapable of having a plurality of opinions expressed freely without the need for people to recourse to violence?
No, it's the same for most countries, let me explain; you don't go to the USA and say bad things about Christianity because you would likely be shot by some crazy guy but on the other hand you, yourself are crazy for saying anti-christian phrases in the US.
I see, so only for terrorists, essentially? Not for blasphemy etc?
Well no, I beleave it should be for major crimes like murder, rape, terrorism, etc.

My point being that you can't really go to a country and say stuff against the things that matter the most to the locals. Pakistan was made on the biases of a country where there were free rights for the Muslims of India where there was little to no chance of a Muslim getting forward in life just because they were Muslim.
I suggest you watch the movie called "Jinnah" which explains the reason why Pakistan was made and it will give you a better understanding about Pakistani people.
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username2950448
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(Original post by Meri Awaaz Suno)
No, it's the same for most countries, let me explain; you don't go to the USA and say bad things about Christianity because you would likely be shot by some crazy guy but on the other hand you, yourself are crazy for saying anti-christian phrases in the US.

My point being that you can't really go to a country and say stuff against the things that matter the most to the locals. Pakistan was maid on the biases of a country where there were free rights for the Muslims of India where there was little to no chance of a Muslim getting forward in life just because they were Muslim. I suggest you watch the movie called "Jinnah" which explains the reason why Pakistan was made and it will give you a better understanding about Pakistani people.
I do not think that is true; there are many prevalent atheist groups in the U.S. which hold anti-religion demonstrations, etc. No one would call for their arrest (let alone murder).

I understand the origins of Pakistan, but how does freedom of speech of some Pakistanis impede the rights of other Pakistanis to practice their religion?

Well no, I beleave it should be for major crimes like murder, rape, terorism, etc.
Would you say most Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy etc?
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Query22
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The Islamic scriptures actually don't command blasphemy killing.

Even so, she isn't a Muslim so contemporary scholars shouldn't advocate her death anyways.
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username2950448
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(Original post by Meri Awaaz Suno)
The man talked about Pakistan and it's nukes. Do you know we have one of the safest nuclear controls in the world?
On this point, what do you make of reports that Saudi helped fund Pakistan's development of nuclear weapons, thus has the option of purchasing some warheads from Pakistan if it ever needs/desires them?
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by Palmyra)
I do not think that is true; there are many prevalent atheist groups in the U.S. which hold anti-religion demonstrations, etc. No one would call for their arrest (let alone murder).

I understand the origins of Pakistan, but how does freedom of speech of some Pakistanis impede the rights of other Pakistanis to practice their religion?


Would you say most Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy etc?
Firstly I would like to respond to your second question; No, I don't beleave that most Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy. Yes, he did break a law for the nation and should be given the appropriate punishment for it.
Despite what the media shows, Pakistan is a very liberal place.
A lot of Pakistan Air Force's Vice Air Marshals have been Christians for example.
You should look at interviews by Brian from the band "Junoon", it's was a Pakistani band with a white American singer. He talks about the people of Pakistan and how they treated him.
I sadly have to say that the Western Media only shows Pakistan in a bad light; there are way to many up's about Pakistan and I'm proud to be Pakistani and British.

And as for freedom of speech, i'm sorry but freedom of speech does not include abusing your rights by verbally abusing a majority religion in a country.
Yes there is freedom of speech in Pakistan for example the anti-priminister march from the past 2-4 years, some agree with it and some don't. You don't see people from both sides being arrested hence because its peaceful and means no harm to the country and it's just opinion. Unlike the blogger that offended the country.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by JohnGreek)
With the only difference that I haven't acted like an EDL apologist in the same way that you have acted like a hardline Islamic apologist. This is through the way in which you keep trying to excuse the death penalty in Pakistan and shift the topic onto irrelevant considerations like atomic bombs. If it makes you any happier, Dandaman's point was also irrelevant to the wider discussion.

What safeguards Pakistan has or hasn't got on its atomic bombs has literally zero bearing on anything you or anyone else said. I personally hope that what you say is true and that one of your miniature devices hasn't been sold through the ISI to any dodgy actors in that part of the world.

Now, going back to the main issue:


I think that most of this post is you trying to explain why these beliefs are widely held by Pakistanis, which is fair enough. However, it's a different thing to say that a) the oppression suffered by Pakistanis in India should be reciprocated on non-Muslims in Pakistan, and b) that the death penalty for apostasy, on an objective level, is acceptable.
I never went off topic but your friend who I replied to did by implying that we (Pakistani's) are not capable of holding weapons of mass destruction. I only proved my point which i blieve is my right.
And where did India come into this? Isn't that off topic?

Why I blieave the death penalty should exist in Pakistan?
Pakistan is different to the UK. There are licence guns available on the market, just like the US and hence murder rate is higher than the UK; well because sadly it's easier to kill over there, i guess... Hence to stop or reduce the murder rate or serious crime rate Pakistan should have the death sentence. Plus Pakistan has seen it's lows (hence the whole nation knows their army chief's name, where as in the UK I doubt some people in the armed forces know their 4*'s name).
Pakistan should have the death sentence for major crimes as I said before and not for hate speech but that does not give you the right to start hate speeching. There should be less strict actions for that such as a jail sentence.
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username2950448
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(Original post by Meri Awaaz Suno)
Firstly I would like to respond to your second question; No, I don't beleave that most Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy. Yes, he did break a law for the nation and should be given the appropriate punishment for it.
If most people don't support it why is it a law of the nation?

Despite what the media shows, Pakistan is a very liberal place.
What you say is good, but I'm not sure they suffice to call Pakistan "liberal". Of course no country is perfect, and even Western countries are far from liberal in many ways, but we should be honest about our flaws if we want to improve.

And as for freedom of speech, i'm sorry but freedom of speech does not include abusing your rights by verbally abusing a majority religion in a country.
Yes there is freedom of speech in Pakistan for example the anti-priminister march from the past 2-4 years, some agree with it and some don't. You don't see people from both sides being arrested hence because its peaceful and means no harm to the country and it's just opinion. Unlike the blogger that offended the country.
Merely being "offended" being enough to warrant criminal punishment seems absurd to me. However, each country is unique and some countries legitimately place national harmony/cohesion over freedom of speech (such as Singapore and Malaysia - it is not just Pakistan).

I do hope that we see some reform in Pakistan, even along the lines of what you suggest would be a big improvement. Thank you for your answers.
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Dodgypirate
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Islam is such a lovely religion/ideology, isn't it.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by JohnGreek)
India came into the discussion when you referred to the treatment the Pakistani Muslim minority faced at the hands of the Indians in post #13:


Whether the death penalty does anything to reduce murder rates is a very difficult-to-navigate argument that's primarily been focused on studies conducted in the US, so I think that I'll skip that point, particularly given that we're talking about the death penalty for blasphemy here.


I feel that this post is riddled with contradictions. Firstly, you say that most Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy, but then go on to say that Pakistan is a 'very liberal place' and has been misrepresented by the media. While I've seen that cities like Islamabad do have very liberal parts (particularly around their university), I do have to wonder how a population that believes, in majority, in the death penalty, is 'liberal' in any way. This is especially given the fact that agreeing that blasphemy = death means that you are probably both a devout Muslim and a conservative when it comes to the criminal system...

Secondly, I do have to wonder how exactly one can 'harm the country' with his atheist blog. If anything, showing such intolerance of non-believers is precisely what, in your words, contributed to the creation of Pakistan in the first place. How can a country whose raison-d'etre was the religious intolerance its people faced apply similar standards to other religious minorities within its borders?
First of all I will go on to say that I have not read the blog by him but I have seen many verbal fights about it online.
I never said in my post that "Pakistanis support the death penalty for blasphemy". Yes, I think that a majority of people don't support the death penalty for blasphemy. I agree that partition between India and Pakistan could have been done better but I would put the blame on Lord Mountbatten for that.
I'm sad that university politics exists in the country and it's not only Islamabad. In fact Karachi's MQM was made as a college political party and you can just see how bad it is... The party is against everything good for the country; even against CPEC.
Yes, the treatment of minorities could and should be a lot better but on the other hand I have lots of Christian friends in Pakistan and their parents are at decent posts like good jobs in PIA, even 1 of their parents is a Major in the Army, one's father is a civil-servant after he did his CSS.
But back to the point; i'm sure that a majority of people are against his death penalty but lets see what the courts say, I'm sure the supreme court of Pakistan will not allow for him to get the rope.
I don't know if the death penalty does anything to reduce murders but it gives the briefed family members and friends a sense of justice that the person that killed their loved one is now having the same treatment. I beleave me I know it mentally helps them get through their loss.
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Meri Awaaz Suno
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(Original post by Palmyra)
If most people don't support it why is it a law of the nation?


What you say is good, but I'm not sure they suffice to call Pakistan "liberal". Of course no country is perfect, and even Western countries are far from liberal in many ways, but we should be honest about our flaws if we want to improve.


Merely being "offended" being enough to warrant criminal punishment seems absurd to me. However, each country is unique and some countries legitimately place national harmony/cohesion over freedom of speech (such as Singapore and Malaysia - it is not just Pakistan).

I do hope that we see some reform in Pakistan, even along the lines of what you suggest would be a big improvement. Thank you for your answers.
Thank you for talking with me, I really enjoyed answering questions with my point of view as a British-Pakistani.
I agree that Pakistan is not perfect but the reason I think it has not been turned into a law and why there has not been any reforms is for the reason that Pakistan's media is turned towards 2 major things; Kashmir, Line of Control and the Eastern Border or the war on terror in FATA. And they should be for good reason as Pakistan (the people) has/have became very sick of their loved ones dying in blasts and APS was the turning point (call it our 9/11) that angered everyone that much that Pakistan Army promised the nation that every blood would be revenged and that they would make Pakistan terror free.
What I mean is that you could say that Pakistan has more major problems to face and this case does not have the same weight in Pakistan. I agree it should have more weight and there are major needs of reforms in many sectors across Pakistan; the national airline, police, etc.
And I defiantly agree with you; the first step to solve a problem is to know you have a problem.
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