Want to get back into drawing - what's the best way to go about it?

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demogorgon
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I used to draw a fair bit. Only every used plain old pencils, not even coloured pencils. I took GCSE Art to try and put that creativity to good use. After having several teachers come and go, supply teachers here and there, and winding up with an E after two years, I lost my creative passion.

Now I'm almost finished up with sixth form, I'm feeling that funky flow again. I have some pencils lying about, but no sketchbooks. What's the best way to get back into drawing?
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PerplexingGeode
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Inherently, try not to feel disheartened about the loss of creative passion or the grade you received; I do not believe that final grades necessarily determine artistic ability, either. The fact that you did not have any stable guidance throughout your GCSE in Art, would not have aided the situation and it would have been distracting, to say the least; since different teachers have different approaches to art/learning etc. Regarding the topic in question, I recommend you purchase a sketchbook that you enjoy the paper texture of (or lack of) - or alternatively, purchase an inexpensive sketchbook - Daler Rowney Graduate sketchbooks are inexpensive and the paper is surprisingly good to draw/sketch on. I use these sketchbooks to do brief and initial sketches ideas:

http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/daler-ro...a5/566184-1000
http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/daler-ro...a4/566183-1000

For more detailed sketches and drawings/paintings/ink, I use the Daler Rowney Ebony Spiral Bound sketchbooks as there is a slight 'tooth' to the paper, however - there is a balanced amount of smoothness to the paper too, which personally makes it an ideal paper for me. The only disadvantage to this sketchbook (in my opinion), is that it is spiral bound, and I prefer hardback/solid bound sketchbooks, due to the fact that the paper stays in place and does not move in accordance to the hand movements made whilst sketching or adding tone.

http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/daler-ro...a4/564782-1001

You could start off by mapping ideas you have in your head, and using references from the internet as a means of developing the ideas you have, or use photographs you have taken personally, to draw from. You don't even have to use sketchbooks - anything you can use to use draw with and on, is enough - after all, your imagination is infinite. Each doodle, study, reference photo, sketch, painting etc counts towards progression in your artistic abilities. :yep: You can gain inspiration from artists on Youtube, such as Danica Sills, Istebrak (who also does very detailed tutorials regarding the human anatomy on Youtube), Audra Auclair, Alphonso Dunn (excellent tutorials on Youtube also, as well as a formidable book) etc - it really depends on what style and subject matter you are looking to progress further in. Do you have any artists that you admire the work of?

I hope this has aided you somewhat! :ahee:

:moon:
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faloodeh
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(Original post by demogorgon)
I used to draw a fair bit. Only every used plain old pencils, not even coloured pencils. I took GCSE Art to try and put that creativity to good use. After having several teachers come and go, supply teachers here and there, and winding up with an E after two years, I lost my creative passion.

Now I'm almost finished up with sixth form, I'm feeling that funky flow again. I have some pencils lying about, but no sketchbooks. What's the best way to get back into drawing?
GCSE Art is awful and kills your passion!
Just take up a pencil and start doing some observational drawings. If you're rusty then itll go after a few drawings. Practice circles, swirls, different techniques (continues line//etc) and draw what you like

I use expensive colour pencils but thats because I use them regularly. If you're looking for some colour I recommend koh-i-noor pencils (I use faber castell but started with these)
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PerplexingGeode
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(Original post by Faloodeh)
GCSE Art is awful and kills your passion!
Just take up a pencil and start doing some observational drawings. If you're rusty then itll go after a few drawings. Practice circles, swirls, different techniques (continues line//etc) and draw what you like

I use expensive colour pencils but thats because I use them regularly. If you're looking for some colour I recommend koh-i-noor pencils (I use faber castell but started with these)
I second this, regarding pencils and paints; more expensive art pencils/paints etc have increased longevity, ie how long they retain their intense colour pigment. Often, artists will either be Prismacolor users, or Faber Castell Polychromo users; I am personally the latter, as I have heard mixed reviews of the Prismacolor pencils; ie the pencil leads regularly breaking, etc.

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faloodeh
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(Original post by PerplexingGeode)
I second this, regarding pencils and paints; more expensive art pencils/paints etc have increased longevity, ie how long they retain their intense colour pigment. Often, artists will either be Prismacolor users, or Faber Castell Polychromo users; I am personally the latter, as I have heard mixed reviews of the Prismacolor pencils; ie the pencil leads regularly breaking, etc.

:moon:
Yep! I had a small set of prismacolors but they were quite waxy and I personally didnt like that. I heard that due to the new manufacturing they broke easily so I dont buy them anymore. Fabercastell polychromos also have a higher level of lightfastness than prismacolor and I like them.(On the pencils, 3 asterisks mean good lightfastness!) But I have yet to find a white colouring pencil that works

I havent got enough experience in oil and watercolours, and I have a basic student acrylic set so I cant say much there
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PerplexingGeode
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(Original post by Faloodeh)
Yep! I had a small set of prismacolors but they were quite waxy and I personally didnt like that. I heard that due to the new manufacturing they broke easily so I dont buy them anymore. Fabercastell polychromos also have a higher level of lightfastness than prismacolor and I like them.(On the pencils, 3 asterisks mean good lightfastness!) But I have yet to find a white colouring pencil that works

I havent got enough experience in oil and watercolours, and I have a basic student acrylic set so I cant say much there
I have heard that koh-i-noor white colouring pencils are very good, however - I have not tried this brand myself; did you receive a white colouring pencil in your koh-i-noor set, as you stated that you commenced drawing with this specific brand?

I agree, I have heard a vast amount regarding lead breakage of Prismacolor pencils, which is a shame; as they have a lot of potential. However, I suppose it is ultimately down to whether you prefer wax based or oil based pencils. :yep: Unfortunately, lead breakage is the identical reason I discontinued using Derwent Graphite Pencils after about 2012, as the leads fractured and broke easily; when attempting to sharpen the pencil, irrespective of the quality of the pencil sharpener or whether a different means was utilised, it would always cause the pencils to split the wood of the entire pencil itself, rendering them useless. Hence, I now use Faber Castell Graphite pencils, which are better and more durable, in my opinion.

I recommend you try the Daler Rowney Georgian Water Mixable Oil paints; they are an excellent alternative to oil paints if the latter is not viable or you dislike the smell of turpentine/white spirit that is used alongside traditional oil paints.

http://www.daler-rowney.com/georgian-wamo

Whilst these paints can be used with water, it does remove some of the vibrant pigment from the paint; thus it is recommended that linseed oil or water mixable oil paint thinner is used, which can bought from Hobbycraft, art and craft stores and online. Thus, this means that the intense pigment from the paints is retained whilst mixing other colours. I actually use these paints myself and am pleased with the paints.

Furthermore, I use Winsor and Newton Cotman Watercolor sets (half pan), which I find to be excellent, though the 45 half pan set can be purchased on Ebay, for a lower price than that of Amazon. However, I recommend you try the pocket set first (this is what I did), to see if you like the watercolour paints themselves; furthermore, although there is no black pigment in the pocket set, this can be easily achieved by mixing 'burnt umber' and 'ultramarine blue'.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Winsor-Newt...ercolour+brush

White Night Watercolour paints are apparently excellent too:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Night...rcolour+paints

Regarding acrylic paints, I recommend that you try the Daler Rowney Graduate Acrylic Paints 120ml, which are often on sale at Hobbycraft for £1.50 each; which last quite a while! I like to collect them over time, purchasing a few at a time so that I eventually have a spectrum of colours to use in my work. However, I have also used Daler Rowney System 3 Acrylic paints, as well as Winsor and Newton Acrylic paints; which are also excellent. Moreover, I have heard that 'Sennelier' is a good brand for acrylics, as is 'Pebeo', although I have never utilised these specific brands myself.

I hope this helps! :ahee:

:tea:
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demogorgon
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(Original post by PerplexingGeode)
I have heard that koh-i-noor white colouring pencils are very good, however - I have not tried this brand myself; did you receive a white colouring pencil in your koh-i-noor set, as you stated that you commenced drawing with this specific brand?

I agree, I have heard a vast amount regarding lead breakage of Prismacolor pencils, which is a shame; as they have a lot of potential. However, I suppose it is ultimately down to whether you prefer wax based or oil based pencils. :yep: Unfortunately, lead breakage is the identical reason I discontinued using Derwent Graphite Pencils after about 2012, as the leads fractured and broke easily; when attempting to sharpen the pencil, irrespective of the quality of the pencil sharpener or whether a different means was utilised, it would always cause the pencils to split the wood of the entire pencil itself, rendering them useless. Hence, I now use Faber Castell Graphite pencils, which are better and more durable, in my opinion.

I recommend you try the Daler Rowney Georgian Water Mixable Oil paints; they are an excellent alternative to oil paints if the latter is not viable or you dislike the smell of turpentine/white spirit that is used alongside traditional oil paints.

http://www.daler-rowney.com/georgian-wamo

Whilst these paints can be used with water, it does remove some of the vibrant pigment from the paint; thus it is recommended that linseed oil or water mixable oil paint thinner is used, which can bought from Hobbycraft, art and craft stores and online. Thus, this means that the intense pigment from the paints is retained whilst mixing other colours. I actually use these paints myself and am pleased with the paints.

Furthermore, I use Winsor and Newton Cotman Watercolor sets (half pan), which I find to be excellent, though the 45 half pan set can be purchased on Ebay, for a lower price than that of Amazon. However, I recommend you try the pocket set first (this is what I did), to see if you like the watercolour paints themselves; furthermore, although there is no black pigment in the pocket set, this can be easily achieved by mixing 'burnt umber' and 'ultramarine blue'.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Winsor-Newt...ercolour+brush

White Night Watercolour paints are apparently excellent too:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Night...rcolour+paints

Regarding acrylic paints, I recommend that you try the Daler Rowney Graduate Acrylic Paints 120ml, which are often on sale at Hobbycraft for £1.50 each; which last quite a while! I like to collect them over time, purchasing a few at a time so that I eventually have a spectrum of colours to use in my work. However, I have also used Daler Rowney System 3 Acrylic paints, as well as Winsor and Newton Acrylic paints; which are also excellent. Moreover, I have heard that 'Sennelier' is a good brand for acrylics, as is 'Pebeo', although I have never utilised these specific brands myself.

I hope this helps! :ahee:

:tea:
Wow, thank you so much for all the help, the both of you! I'm gonna read through all the comments thoroughly and let you know how it goes
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PerplexingGeode
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(Original post by demogorgon)
Wow, thank you so much for all the help, the both of you! I'm gonna read through all the comments thoroughly and let you know how it goes
No worries, I would love to know how it goes for you! Good luck! :yy:

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faloodeh
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(Original post by PerplexingGeode)
I have heard that koh-i-noor white colouring pencils are very good, however - I have not tried this brand myself; did you receive a white colouring pencil in your koh-i-noor set, as you stated that you commenced drawing with this specific brand?

I agree, I have heard a vast amount regarding lead breakage of Prismacolor pencils, which is a shame; as they have a lot of potential. However, I suppose it is ultimately down to whether you prefer wax based or oil based pencils. :yep: Unfortunately, lead breakage is the identical reason I discontinued using Derwent Graphite Pencils after about 2012, as the leads fractured and broke easily; when attempting to sharpen the pencil, irrespective of the quality of the pencil sharpener or whether a different means was utilised, it would always cause the pencils to split the wood of the entire pencil itself, rendering them useless. Hence, I now use Faber Castell Graphite pencils, which are better and more durable, in my opinion.

I recommend you try the Daler Rowney Georgian Water Mixable Oil paints; they are an excellent alternative to oil paints if the latter is not viable or you dislike the smell of turpentine/white spirit that is used alongside traditional oil paints.

http://www.daler-rowney.com/georgian-wamo

Whilst these paints can be used with water, it does remove some of the vibrant pigment from the paint; thus it is recommended that linseed oil or water mixable oil paint thinner is used, which can bought from Hobbycraft, art and craft stores and online. Thus, this means that the intense pigment from the paints is retained whilst mixing other colours. I actually use these paints myself and am pleased with the paints.

Furthermore, I use Winsor and Newton Cotman Watercolor sets (half pan), which I find to be excellent, though the 45 half pan set can be purchased on Ebay, for a lower price than that of Amazon. However, I recommend you try the pocket set first (this is what I did), to see if you like the watercolour paints themselves; furthermore, although there is no black pigment in the pocket set, this can be easily achieved by mixing 'burnt umber' and 'ultramarine blue'.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Winsor-Newt...ercolour+brush

White Night Watercolour paints are apparently excellent too:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Night...rcolour+paints

Regarding acrylic paints, I recommend that you try the Daler Rowney Graduate Acrylic Paints 120ml, which are often on sale at Hobbycraft for £1.50 each; which last quite a while! I like to collect them over time, purchasing a few at a time so that I eventually have a spectrum of colours to use in my work. However, I have also used Daler Rowney System 3 Acrylic paints, as well as Winsor and Newton Acrylic paints; which are also excellent. Moreover, I have heard that 'Sennelier' is a good brand for acrylics, as is 'Pebeo', although I have never utilised these specific brands myself.

I hope this helps! :ahee:

:tea:
I did get a white and used many of them but I dont actually remember if they were worth it lmao. I might invest in one again though, the fabercastell polychromos one is decent at best.

I'll take a look at that brand! I have yet to actually try oil painting though haha :laugh:

And yes!! Ive heard so much about Winsor and Newton I was going to buy a watercolour set since I have decent experience in watercolour! No black is fine, we're supposed to mix colours all the time!

Thank you for the rec! Once I finish these acrylics I'll look at all the brands you mentioned, this is heaven lmao! :lol:
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TruckerWolf
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The best catalyst for creativity is boredom. It is basic human phycology. We all want to feel understood by others and expressing ourselves creatively allows us to do that. Allot of people vent this need to be creative with different things. Musicians make music. Poets write poems. People nit, sow, paint, design, construct, sculpt,-anything to alleviate this basic human need. Once someone has identified a vent that 'does it for them' - that's when magic happens. And if you are an artist like myself, then art is your outlet-a way you can express you creativeness.Now, lets to get to the two main reasons why some people stop or find it hard to continue within a certain vent. Firstly, the biggest killer to creativity is distractions. Limit yourself on gaming, television, social networks ext and you may awaken that need to be creative again. If your day is already full with doing other things you would then need to start MAKING TIME to be creative - and if that is the case it will quickly become labourious and unappealing. Secondly, people change and so do their vents. This does not mean you are no longer an artist. It just means you need to try something different. Think of different techniques, equipment or even styles.This should work
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