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    I am making notes for each subject , however i feel like none of it is actually going in my head , for example geography , how do i make stuff go into my head , just read over them constantly or what ???
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    (Original post by qpzm123)
    I am making notes for each subject , however i feel like none of it is actually going in my head , for example geography , how do i make stuff go into my head , just read over them constantly or what ???
    Try more creative stuff; a mindmap, perhaps? Maybe write in different colours? When I did my A Levels I literally recorded myself reading certain key facts for each topic and listened to it at the start and end of each day (as psychologically, that's when you take in the most).
    Flash cards are also very useful - instead of a block of text, do a question/answer approach until you get them.
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    Making notes itself as an act very rarely makes the information go in. You have to do something with it. For example, you could rewrite it on cue cards, mind maps, make diagrams, create a song. Anything will do, so long as your entire technique isn't just making notes on paper and starting at them, trying to make them go in. This works for a very small number of people.

    For my geography (and English lit), we used to play the "case study game". Basically, it was where a person names a geography case study (e.g. Bangladesh Floods) and we went in turns to name a fact about the case study. If you couldn't think of one, you were out. The "winner" is the person who is the last person remaining. They then get to choose a new case study. It's good for it you're walking to the bus stop, or eating lunch together. It sounds quite boring but it really worked! With English, we did the same thing with the "quote" game. You'd choose a theme or character, and say quotes rather than facts.
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    (Original post by qpzm123)
    I am making notes for each subject , however i feel like none of it is actually going in my head , for example geography , how do i make stuff go into my head , just read over them constantly or what ???
    for sciences, idk if it works for geo, past papers and questions works for me, ofc looking at mark scheme after, its just cos

    - you learn things more when you are wrong first (past paper questions)
    - lets your revision be applied more to specific exam style
    - mark schemes are the best revision points

    you might say 'oh no but I havent revised enough to answer past papers yet or I want to save them up'

    well dont save em cos youll never got through all of em anyway. and you have to start somewhere with the past papers so just give it a shot now, its not like your current method works better....
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    Regarding past papers, like ForestShadow says, don't worry about doing them before revising. If anything, it's a great way to start. You'll know without revising what you're good at and what you need to focus on.
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    You need variety of study methods. Some people find it easier than others to remember.
    Once you have the notes, then flash cards are quite good, mind maps etc, then move onto past papers.
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    (Original post by qpzm123)
    I am making notes for each subject , however i feel like none of it is actually going in my head , for example geography , how do i make stuff go into my head , just read over them constantly or what ???
    I agree with skyrees, doing more active and creative forms of revision can be much more succesful, i enjoy using quizlet and watching youtube videos on topics, when i did my gcses I stuck mindmaps up everywhere in my room and printing off diagrams and labelling them with post its can be a great way of making learning more fun. It's not necessarily accurate for everyone, but you can do one of those learning style tests, it might tell you what methods could work better for you
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    Specifically for languages (from someone that did 4 at GCSE), it's very much about practise. Go over your verb tables and practise conjugating verbs and using them to write sentences every day. Have fun with it and make up some nonsense ones too (eg for Italian I use to write weird stuff like "sono una mela" = "I am an apple". But hey, I never forget the word apple anymore.)

    Specifically for sciences, Art, Music and especially Maths it's a case of constant practise. Notes on, say, trigonometry are good, but not if you're not used to actually utilising them. Anyone that's done past GCSE can tell you that practise it what gets you anywhere, so just set aside maybe half an hour each day to practise the areas you're not so confident on. Past papers as others have stated are a fantastic way to do this. For art subjects you just have to keep rehearsing your chosen mediums/pieces in run-up to the end.

    For humanities subjects (English, History etc) the key is to learn the structure of an essay (ie History would be intro, point 1, counterpoint, point 2, counterpoint, conclude etc) and don't write entire practise essays, but rather work on your critical skills and how you'd answer just one paragraph/counterpoint. For English specifically, I recommend flashcards with quotes on them.

    For ICT, it's generally just common sense I found but using any programs on your computer will help; I used Excel to practise the formulae in spreadsheets.

    Can't really help with any other subjects, as that's all I did.
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    (Original post by qpzm123)
    I am making notes for each subject , however i feel like none of it is actually going in my head , for example geography , how do i make stuff go into my head , just read over them constantly or what ???
    Hey qpzm123,

    First of all if your notes aren't sinking in, don't panic! It's just about finding the best way that you learn and for a lot of people this isn't just by making and re-reading notes.

    Do you like to doodle and make things colourful? If so you might be a visual learner and tend to remember how things looks - if this is the case try drawing mind maps, or little diagrams, or use different colours to write out keywords or categorise things.

    If you remember things better by hearing them or saying them out loud you're probably an aural learner - you could listen to podcasts or write keywords and facts and say them out loud over and over, maybe record yourself, or even though it sounds cheesy - make rhymes and little tunes out of things!

    If you learner better from actually doing things you're more of a physical/kinesthetic learner so doing things like past papers and then going through the answers to see what you got wrong or write might help you to remember better. Or even if reading notes doesn't help you remember, the act or writing them out over and over again might.

    I hope this helps and you find the best way to revise! But feel free to ask if you have any more questions!

    Good luck!
    Lydia
    The BCU team
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    (Original post by Birmingham City University)
    Hey qpzm123,

    First of all if your notes aren't sinking in, don't panic! It's just about finding the best way that you learn and for a lot of people this isn't just by making and re-reading notes.

    Do you like to doodle and make things colourful? If so you might be a visual learner and tend to remember how things looks - if this is the case try drawing mind maps, or little diagrams, or use different colours to write out keywords or categorise things.

    If you remember things better by hearing them or saying them out loud you're probably an aural learner - you could listen to podcasts or write keywords and facts and say them out loud over and over, maybe record yourself, or even though it sounds cheesy - make rhymes and little tunes out of things!

    If you learner better from actually doing things you're more of a physical/kinesthetic learner so doing things like past papers and then going through the answers to see what you got wrong or write might help you to remember better. Or even if reading notes doesn't help you remember, the act or writing them out over and over again might.

    I hope this helps and you find the best way to revise! But feel free to ask if you have any more questions!

    Good luck!
    Lydia
    The BCU team
    Wow thanks for the reply Lydia ! I'll take in what you said and revise hard. Thank you and have a wonderful day !
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    I feel the main way to remember things is to answer questions which directly use that knowledge, answer the questions from memory and not with notes and you should remember it after a while.
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    (Original post by qpzm123)
    Wow thanks for the reply Lydia ! I'll take in what you said and revise hard. Thank you and have a wonderful day !
    No problem, and you too!

    Let us know when you think you've figured out what type of learner you are and we'll see if we've got any more tips!

    Lydia
    BCU team
 
 
 
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