How many gap year applicants successfully get into Medicine?

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sfarihaman
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People who do not apply to Medicine or got rejected apply the year after year 13. But how many of these gap year applicants actually get a place in Medicine? Are they more likely to get a place than year 12 applicants?
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theresheglows
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Can't give you numbers, but the likelihood of an offer is probably no more or less than year 13 applicants. They do have the advantage that, if given an offer, they already have their grades and so do not have the risk of missing their offer and their place on results day, they also have more time to get work experience and possibly improve any weaknesses in their application that prevented them getting an offer the first time.
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Ms.leena
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(Original post by theresheglows)
Can't give you numbers, but the likelihood of an offer is probably no more or less than year 13 applicants. They do have the advantage that, if given an offer, they already have their grades and so do not have the risk of missing their offer and their place on results day, they also have more time to get work experience and possibly improve any weaknesses in their application that prevented them getting an offer the first time.
Hi, i'm a current AS student with the plan of taking a gap year and applying for medicine with in that gap year without reapplying meaning i won't apply for any course this year. Would you recommend this or have me apply this year (in Year13) just in case? (Sorry this is a bit off topic from the title of this thread but you seem to know quite a bit regarding gap years) The reason i want to take this route is because I want that time to build myself in terms of independence and general life skills and i feel like jumping straight from a levels to a course that requires me to have so much drive, determination as well as taking a very long time, won't give me the time to build on myself- this would al so help me really figure out if medicine really is for me and hopefully prevent me from making a decision that i would regret. I don't want to apply this year/year13 because i feel like i'll spend the majority of the time stressing about interviews, which university i want to go to and whatnot and that would have me fall back on my A level grades. Within the gap year i'll be volunteering abroad in a healthcare field and working as a tutor for the rest of the time as well as getting a lot of work experience done. A lot of people are telling me not to because i'll forget a lot and there's a less likely chance if i don't apply the first time. Even if i get the A*A*A* i'd still constantly revise, but would not applying at all the first time be a big drawback? Thank you in advance.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Ms.leena)
Hi, i'm a current AS student with the plan of taking a gap year and applying for medicine with in that gap year without reapplying meaning i won't apply for any course this year. Would you recommend this or have me apply this year (in Year13) just in case? (Sorry this is a bit off topic from the title of this thread but you seem to know quite a bit regarding gap years) The reason i want to take this route is because I want that time to build myself in terms of independence and general life skills and i feel like jumping straight from a levels to a course that requires me to have so much drive, determination as well as taking a very long time, won't give me the time to build on myself- this would al so help me really figure out if medicine really is for me and hopefully prevent me from making a decision that i would regret. I don't want to apply this year/year13 because i feel like i'll spend the majority of the time stressing about interviews, which university i want to go to and whatnot and that would have me fall back on my A level grades. Within the gap year i'll be volunteering abroad in a healthcare field and working as a tutor for the rest of the time as well as getting a lot of work experience done. A lot of people are telling me not to because i'll forget a lot and there's a less likely chance if i don't apply the first time. Even if i get the A*A*A* i'd still constantly revise, but would not applying at all the first time be a big drawback? Thank you in advance.
I would probably apply this year, but it is not an obvious decision. This is mainly because it will give you experience of the application process - doing the UKCAT, writing a PS, attending interviews. You can apply for deferred entry without prejudice as far as I'm aware (for example), citing the reasons you do above which sound reasonable, in which case you have little to lose. It does require effort and some expense (UCAS fees, UKCAT fees, travel for interview) though so it depends on your circumstance.

The other consideration is that its all good that you wish to get experience in your gap year, but bear in mind that medical applications are due in mid October. If you want said experience to be on your application, it needs to be done by then. You will also need to attend interviews which can be any time from November and March, sometimes with pretty short notice. This can cause trouble with travel plans.

I would apply for deferred entry - if you succeed you have an offer and don't need to attend interviews in your gap year. If you fail you have only gained experience for use next year.
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The Medic Portal
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(Original post by svsvsv)
People who do not apply to Medicine or got rejected apply the year after year 13. But how many of these gap year applicants actually get a place in Medicine? Are they more likely to get a place than year 12 applicants?
Hi there!

Your likelihood of getting offers for Medicine depends entirely on your application, UKCAT score, BMAT score, interview performance etc - so no more or less likely to receive offers than other applicants!

If you're taking a year out, the best thing you can do to increase your chances of gaining an offer is to strengthen your application by gaining more work experience, working on your interview technique and preparing thoroughly for the BMAT/UKCAT.

We have some useful pages and blogs on boosting your application during your gap year:

- Reapplying to Medical School
- What To Do When You Don't Receive Your Offers
- How to Make the Most of a Gap Year

Hope this helps - good luck!
The Medic Portal
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sfarihaman
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(Original post by Ms.leena)
Hi, i'm a current AS student with the plan of taking a gap year and applying for medicine with in that gap year without reapplying meaning i won't apply for any course this year. Would you recommend this or have me apply this year (in Year13) just in case? (Sorry this is a bit off topic from the title of this thread but you seem to know quite a bit regarding gap years) The reason i want to take this route is because I want that time to build myself in terms of independence and general life skills and i feel like jumping straight from a levels to a course that requires me to have so much drive, determination as well as taking a very long time, won't give me the time to build on myself- this would al so help me really figure out if medicine really is for me and hopefully prevent me from making a decision that i would regret. I don't want to apply this year/year13 because i feel like i'll spend the majority of the time stressing about interviews, which university i want to go to and whatnot and that would have me fall back on my A level grades. Within the gap year i'll be volunteering abroad in a healthcare field and working as a tutor for the rest of the time as well as getting a lot of work experience done. A lot of people are telling me not to because i'll forget a lot and there's a less likely chance if i don't apply the first time. Even if i get the A*A*A* i'd still constantly revise, but would not applying at all the first time be a big drawback? Thank you in advance.
Hey I'm exactly the same as you. I am in year 13 now though and will be taking a gap year for the exact same reasons. I will be applying this year for medicine. Fingers crossed I get the grades.
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Ms.leena
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(Original post by nexttime)
I would probably apply this year, but it is not an obvious decision. This is mainly because it will give you experience of the application process - doing the UKCAT, writing a PS, attending interviews. You can apply for deferred entry without prejudice as far as I'm aware (for example), citing the reasons you do above which sound reasonable, in which case you have little to lose. It does require effort and some expense (UCAS fees, UKCAT fees, travel for interview) though so it depends on your circumstance.

The other consideration is that its all good that you wish to get experience in your gap year, but bear in mind that medical applications are due in mid October. If you want said experience to be on your application, it needs to be done by then. You will also need to attend interviews which can be any time from November and March, sometimes with pretty short notice. This can cause trouble with travel plans.

I would apply for deferred entry - if you succeed you have an offer and don't need to attend interviews in your gap year. If you fail you have only gained experience for use next year.
I didn't even know deferred entry was possible with medicine! I'll definitely look that up. I've noticed the time to get the travelling experience in is a problem but even year13 would give me more time to get things done i guess. You've been so helpful and your advice is duly noted, thanks a lot.
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Ms.leena
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(Original post by svsvsv)
Hey I'm exactly the same as you. I am in year 13 now though and will be taking a gap year for the exact same reasons. I will be applying this year for medicine. Fingers crossed I get the grades.
Good luck! I may message you in upcoming months to see how its going if thats alright. Are you happy with this route so far and are you going to take your UKCAT and BMAT this year? Also, do you think you have had more time than others in terms of revision as you haven't revised for interviews and whatnot this year? Sorry about the question overload, just glad theres someone else doing this and hopefully i can relate to.
Thanks in advance.
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sfarihaman
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(Original post by Ms.leena)
Good luck! I may message you in upcoming months to see how its going if thats alright. Are you happy with this route so far and are you going to take your UKCAT and BMAT this year? Also, do you think you have had more time than others in terms of revision as you haven't revised for interviews and whatnot this year? Sorry about the question overload, just glad theres someone else doing this and hopefully i can relate to.
Thanks in advance.

Yeah, no problem at all.
I am happy with the route taken yes, although I was highly advised against it, it was my choice and I know what is best for me. I was told to defer but I just wanted to spend my gap year doing this so I can spend more time into a good application.
I will be doing UKCAT, as I don't have the effort to do 2 aptitude tests (and also because the unis I will apply for require UKCAT). I'd rather do one and do better in that anyways.
I also have more time for revision and for myself too. I found that people in my year group that had interviews for medicine were quite stressed and busy.

Let us know if you have any more questions.
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artful_lounger
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I imagine of those who spend their gap years sipping alcohol out of a coconut on a beach, very few.

Similarly those who jet off on voluntourism gap "yahs" similarly likely have poor outlook.

If you spend your gap year doing something vaguely productive, be it volunteering at St Johns Ambulance or a local charity, or as one guy apparently did, become a special constable, that will likely improve your prospects.

That said even if you just spend it working in some dull retail job they can't realistically hold you saving money in preparation for (increasingly expensive) university studies against you, and you would have a reasonable case to appeal if they did.

Just don't spend the year paying large sums of money for ways to make yourself look better on an application, or feel better about yourself, without doing any actual work to get to that point.
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