Should I choose Oxford or LSE? (Genuinely stuck)

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FutureLSEer
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Cannot decide.
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Klix88
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(Original post by FutureLSEer)
By some miracle I've gotten offers for economic history based masters from both Oxford and LSE.

The thing is, I've gotten a scholarship from LSE meaning that in total the degree would cost me about £4,000. I got a much smaller scholarship from Oxford so the course would cost £16,000. So 4x as much.

My question is, is it worth going for Oxford despite the massive difference in fees?






(nm my username, I made it before i got the oxford offer)
If going to Oxford is likely to cause you such a level of financial difficulty that it might be distracting, you may find that you'd get a better outcome from LSE anyway.

In terms of reputation, LSE is well up there with Oxford when it comes to economics-based courses. In some respects, LSE is probably superior.

Ideally you should choose the course which is the best fit for your interests, but if financial issues are driving your decision, then it may have been made for you anyway.
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jkls92
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Oxford, but with that smart nickname maybe better LSE.
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Osiris Wintereisse
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Hi, I did an Economics degree at Cambridge, and did a masters at LSE where I have pretty good insight into how the undergraduate course is structured at LSE as well. The caveat here is that I am going to equate the Oxford/Cambridge teaching system as they both employ the tutorial system.

The answer to your question seriously depends on the learning experience that you are seeking. I found the LSE teaching pretty abysmal and if intellectual stimulation and learning are high priorities on your list, I would recommend Oxbridge. The tutorial system is markedly better. There is also a complete lack of campus at the LSE, which for me was an issue, after being surrounded by beautiful buildings during my undergraduate years. Also factor in that living expenses in central London will be much higher, which would erode away some of the fee differential that you are talking about.

LSE's reputation in Economics is mostly due to the postgraduate research projects that they do, so don't expect this to spillover to undergraduate years - it's also worth bearing in mind that LSE frequently gets the lowest student satisfaction scores out of all the 'elite universities'.

However, if your priorities are in getting employed by the top banking firms etc. the LSE might be a better bet. A lot of the students at LSE are more career oriented and the top banks do heavily recruit from LSE. However, employers often tend not to care about what your course was and only look at the institutional reputation, in which case Oxbridge would most often if not always trump the LSE.
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FutureLSEer
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(Original post by Osiris Wintereisse)
Hi, I did an Economics degree at Cambridge, and did a masters at LSE where I have pretty good insight into how the undergraduate course is structured at LSE as well. The caveat here is that I am going to equate the Oxford/Cambridge teaching system as they both employ the tutorial system.

The answer to your question seriously depends on the learning experience that you are seeking. I found the LSE teaching pretty abysmal and if intellectual stimulation and learning are high priorities on your list, I would recommend Oxbridge. The tutorial system is markedly better. There is also a complete lack of campus at the LSE, which for me was an issue, after being surrounded by beautiful buildings during my undergraduate years. Also factor in that living expenses in central London will be much higher, which would erode away some of the fee differential that you are talking about.

LSE's reputation in Economics is mostly due to the postgraduate research projects that they do, so don't expect this to spillover to undergraduate years - it's also worth bearing in mind that LSE frequently gets the lowest student satisfaction scores out of all the 'elite universities'.

However, if your priorities are in getting employed by the top banking firms etc. the LSE might be a better bet. A lot of the students at LSE are more career oriented and the top banks do heavily recruit from LSE. However, employers often tend not to care about what your course was and only look at the institutional reputation, in which case Oxbridge would most often if not always trump the LSE.
Just to clarify, I'm going to be doing a Master's, not undergrad
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Osiris Wintereisse
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(Original post by FutureLSEer)
Just to clarify, I'm going to be doing a Master's, not undergrad
Hey sorry I misread your initial post. However, I think the reasons would still be applicable. The LSE masters strength is more in the quantitative side of things anyway. It will ultimately boil down to where your priorities lie.
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