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    Which should I apply for?

    I don't know what I want to do later in life, but I'd like a career that will involve using my physics degree.
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    Which should I apply for?

    I don't know what I want to do later in life, but I'd like a career that will involve using my physics degree.
    It doesn't matter because at most universities it won't matter as you can convert between the two usually up to your second year at university.
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    A BSc sounds more normal.
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    Which should I apply for?

    I don't know what I want to do later in life, but I'd like a career that will involve using my physics degree.
    Sorry didn't read your question properly. the MPhy is a 4 year course as opposed to the three year course that a BSc is. If you want to specifically use Physics in your career - such as going into research, then I would recommend going for an MPhy
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    (Original post by steerpike1985)
    Sorry didn't read your question properly. the MPhy is a 4 year course as opposed to the three year course that a BSc is. If you want to specifically use Physics in your career - such as going into research, then I would recommend going for an MPhy
    Yeah, master's courses are more for research cos you do a research project in the 4th year. However, you can still do a PhD after doing a BSc. It's "MPhys" btw.
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    Yes you're right - it's MPhys, my mistake... how easy is it to swap then? And what about degrees that are only offered as a MPhys or as a BSc?
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    Yes you're right - it's MPhys, my mistake... how easy is it to swap then? And what about degrees that are only offered as a MPhys or as a BSc?
    It should be really easy to swap. Usually, you'll choose whether to stay on a BSc course or change to the MPhys (or vice versa) at the end of the 2nd year. You might need better marks to go on to the MPhys though. Not sure about courses only being offered as BSc or MPhys, most places do both (actually, my course is only a BSc but I am gonna ask if I can do the MSci). What universities are you looking at?
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    I haven't found anything that mentions the abilty to swap in the Oxford prospectus... and Manchester and Inperial both only offer the "Physics with a Year in Europe" as an MPhys
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    I haven't found anything that mentions the abilty to swap in the Oxford prospectus... and Manchester and Inperial both only offer the "Physics with a Year in Europe" as an MPhys
    Ah. Ask elpaw about Physics at Oxford. With Manchester and Imperial, the year in Europe courses are MPhys cos their 3rd year abroad counts towards the degree. I'm doing a year in Europe at Birmingham, but that year won't count so I'll get a BSc. I've checked Imperial's site and they do do the Physics course (without the year abroad) as an MSci (as well as the BSc): http://www.ic.ac.uk/p1892.htm. Manchester also offer both BSc and MPhys: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergra...egree/atoz.htm.
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    I know that, but I really want to do a year abroad... I'm only looking at other courses cos my parents insisted :/
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    I know that, but I really want to do a year abroad... I'm only looking at other courses cos my parents insisted :/
    So what's wrong with doing the master's? There don't seem to be many Physics courses with a year abroad though .
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    There don't seem to be many Physics courses with a year abroad though .
    No, you're right... there are only 10, plus a few that offer the chance to spend 1 or 2 terms abroad in the course of a normal degree
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    No, you're right... there are only 10, plus a few that offer the chance to spend 1 or 2 terms abroad in the course of a normal degree
    Oh ok. I wasn't too sure cos I didn't apply for Physics. Anyways, if you've got questions about uni Physics send me a PM .
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    There don't seem to be many Physics courses with a year abroad though .
    You're right, there're only 10 - excluding the ones which offer 1 or 2 terms abroad during the normal degree
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    How did you get a place, if you didn't apply for it then...?
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    However, you can still do a PhD after doing a BSc.
    Wrong, most of the top research institutions in the UK are now requiring undergraduate or postgraduate masters in order to a PhD in the physical sciences. My advice is go for the MPhys, its' a better degree, if the going gets tough you can drop down to the BSc.
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    when i was applying for uni got was told that there are pro's and cons to doing a MGeog (and i presume these are the same for the MPhys...)
    Basically its good to apply for the 4 year course (or change through your degree) because it means that you'll get your student loan for the full 4 years (you don;t get a loan for a second degree) BUT its hard to tell now whether 3 years down the line you'll still want to be continuing with your course and also some people would prefer to do a masters afterwards so you appear to have more qualifications (ie a BA and a MGeog in my case).....but as people have sad uni's are fairly flexible about allowing people to change their coruse once they get there so initially what you appy for doesn;t really matter all that much so if getting the grades to do the MPhys is less certain than just for the normal degree it might be worth not applying for it and so making it ore likely you'll getin the the first place
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Wrong, most of the top research institutions in the UK are now requiring undergraduate or postgraduate masters in order to a PhD in the physical sciences. My advice is go for the MPhys, its' a better degree, if the going gets tough you can drop down to the BSc.
    WTF? I was told you could. I'm a bit screwed then .

    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    How did you get a place, if you didn't apply for it then...?
    I asked to change to Physics.
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    At Durham, and I suspect the majority of other universities, the choice is purely cosmetic, and will only affect official course documents, the teaching on the MPhys and BSc is the same for the first three years, then of course the BSc ends and the MPhys carries on. I was told that at Durham you choose in your third year whether you want to continue or not.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Wrong, most of the top research institutions in the UK are now requiring undergraduate or postgraduate masters in order to a PhD in the physical sciences.
    nonsense, and since when did the top research institutions dictate a blanket rule?
 
 
 
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